Ben Jeby

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Ben Jeby (born Morris Jebaltowsky, in 1907), was an American world champion middleweight champion boxer from the Lower East Side of New York City.[1][2][3]

Jeby was Jewish, and one of a number of Jewish title-holders of the time.[4][5][6][7] On March 20, 1930, weighing 157.5 pounds, he defeated Len Harvey on points over 12 rounds in a unanimous decision at Madison Square Garden in New York City.[8][9]

From 1932-33, Jeby was the New York Boxing Commission version Middleweight Champion of the World.[3][10][11] Jeby defeated Canadian Frankie Battaglia, viewed as one of the world's best middleweights, by TKO at Madison Square Garden in a title fight on January 13, 1933.[12][13] Jeby fought Vince Dundee to a draw over 15 rounds, keeping his title, at Madison Square Garden on March 17, 1933.[14] On August 9, 1933, he was knocked out by Lou Brouillard in the seventh round of a scheduled 15-round title fight at the Polo Grounds.[15][16]

In 73 bouts, he was 54-14 with 22 knockouts.[17]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Day by day in Jewish sports history. KTAV Publishing House, Inc. 2008. Retrieved January 21, 2011. 
  2. ^ When boxing was a Jewish sport. Praeger. 1997. Retrieved January 21, 2011. 
  3. ^ a b The Jewish boxers hall of fame. SP Books. 1988. Retrieved January 21, 2011. 
  4. ^ Jews and American Popular Culture: Sports, leisure, and lifestyle. Praeger Publishers. 2007. Retrieved January 21, 2011. 
  5. ^ Tunney: Boxing's Brainiest Champ and His Upset of the Great Jack Dempsey. Random House. 2007. Retrieved January 21, 2011. 
  6. ^ Sports and the American Jew. Syracuse University Press. 1998. Retrieved January 21, 2011. 
  7. ^ The new American sport history: recent approaches and perspectives. 1997. Retrieved January 21, 2011. 
  8. ^ "Jeby Beats Len Harvey at New York", The Meriden Daily Journal, March 21, 1931
  9. ^ "Len Harvey Ready to Return Home", The Milwaukee Journal, March 21, 1931
  10. ^ Newsweek. Retrieved January 21, 2011. 
  11. ^ Nat Fleischer's All-time ring record. O'Brien suburban press. 1943. Retrieved January 21, 2011. 
  12. ^ Dictionary of Manitoba biography. Univ. of Manitoba Press. 1999. Retrieved January 21, 2011. 
  13. ^ "Jeby Kayoes Canuck Boxer", Youngstown Vindicator, January 14, 1933
  14. ^ Baltimore's Boxing Legacy, 1893-2003. Arcadia Publishing. 2003. Retrieved January 21, 2011. 
  15. ^ "Larruping Lou Belts Out Jeby; Left to Chin Puts Jewish Boy Away for Evening", The Vancouver Sun, August 10, 1933
  16. ^ An Illustrated History of Boxing. Citadel Press. 2002. Retrieved January 21, 2011. 
  17. ^ The Big Book of Jewish Sports Heroes: An Illustrated Compendium of Sports History and The 150 Greatest Jewish Sports Stars. SP Books. 2007. Retrieved January 21, 2011. 

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