Benin–Russia relations

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Benin–Russia relations
Map indicating locations of Benin and Russia

Benin

Russia

Benin–Russia relations (Russian: Российско-бенинские отношения) is the relationship between the two countries, Benin and Russia.

Soviet-era relations[edit]

The Soviet Union recognised the Republic of Dahomey as an independent and sovereign state on 18 August 1960, and diplomatic relations between the two states were established on 4 June 1962.[1] From 24 July 1962, diplomatic relations between the two countries were conducted via the Soviet Embassy in Togo, until 1 February 1966, when the first Soviet Ambassador to Benin, Alexander Nikitich Abramov, was appointed.[2][3]

Relations between the two countries were initially minimal, however, Soviet interactions with the country intensified after Mathieu Kérékou came to power in a coup in October 1972, and whom proclaimed in 1974 that Dahomey would follow a Marxist-Leninist course. This saw the Soviet Union becoming Kérékou's major political ally in the international stage.[3][4]

The Soviet Navy made periodic port calls to Cotonou, where between 1953 and 1980 a total of 462 ship days were spent in the capital.[5]

In November 1986, Kérékou went on a state visit to the Soviet Union, and met with Mikhail Gorbachev. During the visit a declaration of friendship and co-operation was signed.[6]

Russian Federation relations[edit]

On 9 January 1992 Benin recognised the Russian Federation as the successor state to the Soviet Union, after the latter's dissolution.[3] Russia has an embassy in Cotonou, and Benin has an embassy in Moscow.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ginsburgs, George; Slusser, Robert M. (1981). A calendar of Soviet treaties, 1958-1973. BRILL. p. 795. ISBN 90-286-0609-2. Retrieved 2009-07-18. 
  2. ^ Послы Союза Советских Социалистических Республик В Странах Африканского Региона (in Russian). Worldwide Historical Project. Retrieved 2009-07-26. 
  3. ^ a b c Российско-бенинские отношения (in Russian). Embassy of Russia in Benin. Retrieved 2009-07-18. 
  4. ^ "Benin Hazardous Waste". American University. 1 December 2000. Retrieved 2009-07-18. 
  5. ^ Harkavy, Robert E. (1989). Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, ed. Bases Abroad. Oxford University Press. pp. 53, 61. ISBN 0-19-829131-0. Retrieved 2009-07-18. 
  6. ^ Бенин (Страны мира 1987 год) (in Russian). Strani.ru. Retrieved 2009-07-18. 

External links[edit]