Benito Carbone

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Benito Carbone
Personal information
Date of birth (1971-08-14) 14 August 1971 (age 42)
Place of birth Bagnara Calabra, Italy
Height 5 ft 6 in (1.68 m)
Playing position Second striker / Winger
Club information
Current team
Leeds United (Special Consultant)
Youth career
1987–88 Torino
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1988–1990 Torino 7 (0)
1990–1991 Reggina 31 (5)
1991–1992 Casertana 32 (4)
1992–1993 Ascoli 28 (6)
1993–1994 Torino 28 (3)
1994–1995 Napoli 29 (4)
1995–1996 Inter 32 (2)
1996–1999 Sheffield Wednesday 96 (25)
1999–2000 Aston Villa 24 (4)
2000–2002 Bradford City 42 (10)
2001–2002 Derby County (loan) 13 (1)
2002 Middlesbrough (loan) 13 (1)
2002–2003 Como 22 (2)
2003–2004 Parma 19 (4)
2004–2005 Catanzaro 27 (7)
2005–2006 Vicenza 28 (5)
2006 Sydney FC (loan) 3 (2)
2007–2010 Pavia 80 (27)
Total 515 (95)
National team
Italy U21 8 (3)
Teams managed
2010-2011 Pavia (Youth Coach)
2011 Pavia
2011 Varese
2012-2013 St.Christophe
2014- Leeds United (Special Consultant)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.
† Appearances (Goals).

Benito "Benny" Carbone (born 14 August 1971 in Bagnara) is an Italian football Manager and retired Player.[1] He currently works at Leeds United as 'Special Consultant to the Board of Directors'.[2] He played as a forward, winger or midfielder. During his career he played professional football for 17 different clubs including Napoli, Inter and Sheffield Wednesday.

He also represented Italy U21's 8 times during his playing career.

Playing career[edit]

Early Playing Career[edit]

Carbone began his career in 1989 with Torino in his native Italy, he had spells at Reggina, Casertana and Ascoli, before a second spell at Torino. In 1994, Carbone signed for giants Napoli, at Napoli he was given the number 10 shirt, famously worn by Diego Maradona and Gianfranco Zola, after impressing at Napoli where he counted Fabio Cannavaro as a teamate, he helped the club qualify for the UEFA Cup.

Inter Milan[edit]

Carbone form at Napoli earned him a move to Inter Milan, Inter Milan also signed Roberto Carlos, Paul Ince and Javier Zanetti alongside Carbone. Carbone was handed the number 10 shirt at Inter Milan, where he competed for places up front with Maurizio Ganz and Marco Branca during the 1995/96 season. After the appointment of Roy Hodgson and arrival of Striker Iván Zamorano from Real Madrid, Hodgson planned to play Carbone wide on the right instead of his preferred position as second striker. Carbone who was given the ultimatum by Hodgson to play in the wide right position, decided to leave the club. Inter Milan instead signed French International Youri Djorkaeff to replace Carbone.

Sheffield Wednesday[edit]

He signed for Sheffield Wednesday for £3 million in 1996. At Wednesday Carbone played alongside his compatriot Paolo Di Canio; Carbone has spoken fondly of playing alongside the Italian striker. Carbone became the club's highest goalscorer for the 1998–99 season, scoring nine goals, and was voted the fans' favourite player and player of the season.[3] In spite of his good form, Carbone suffered from a split in the dressing room between him and Di Canio on one side and the club's English players on the other. In an interview with the Daily Mail in January 2013, Carbone recalled that the English players often invited him to go drinking with them, but as he was teetotal he would always decline their offers; he claimed that it may have exacerbated the rift in the dressing room.[4] After a contract dispute with Wednesday at the start of the 1999–2000 season over a new contract he was linked with a move away from the club. During his time at the club, Carbone was known for his spectacular goals, with memorable efforts including an overhead kick vs Newcastle United and a chip against Nottingham Forest in 1998.

Aston Villa[edit]

He joined Aston Villa for an undisclosed fee and played for a season at Villa Park, His most memorable moment came when he scored a hat-trick against Leeds United in a 3-2 win in the FA Cup, including a spectacular long range strike from 35 yards; the day before the match, Villa manager John Gregory had refused to let the homesick Italian return to his homeland, insisting he would feel better after scoring against Leeds.[5] This, added to his strikes against Darlington[6] and Everton,[7] meant he contributed five goals in Villa's cup run that season. Carbone started in the FA Cup final alongside strike partner Dion Dublin in a 1-0 loss to Chelsea in the 2000 final, with Chelsea winning the match 1-0 after a goal by Roberto Di Matteo, Carbone nearly scored when his goal bound shot was cleared off the line by Frank Leboeuf.[8] The loss meant Carbone, earned an FA Cup runners-up medal by playing in the final.

At the start of the 2000–01 season, several clubs including Fiorentina, Napoli, Perugia Everton, Coventry City and Bradford City showed an interest in Carbone's services. Carbone was especially strongly linked with a move to Fiorentina to return to Serie A as a replacement for playmaker Rui Costa who was linked with leaving the club.[9]

Bradford City[edit]

Bradford City, who had just escaped relegation from the Premiership the previous season and were aiming to establish themselves in the top flight, made the best offer to Carbone and he joined the Yorkshire club on a free transfer. The club also signed Stan Collymore to play alongside him. Despite some disillusionment over Carbone's wages, he scored some memorable goals and endeared himself to the Valley Parade faithful.[10] Bradford City were relegated and, although he played the start of the following season with them as well as pledging his future to them,[11] he later moved on loan to first Derby County, where he scored once against former club Aston Villa,[12] and then Middlesbrough, where he again scored once in the league against Aston Villa.[13] In 2002, after Bradford chairman Geoffrey Richmond informed him that the club would fold if they continued to pay his £40,000-a-week wages. Carbone, revealed in later years that he didn't want to be known as the man who made Bradford City fold and he gave up £3.2 million.[14]

Later career[edit]

Carbone left Bradford and returned to Italy with Como and played for Parma from 2003 to 2005, at Parma, Carbone revitalised his career under the leadership of Cesare Prandelli. Parma were in financial trouble and had to sell star players during the season such as Adrian Mutu, Adriano and Hidetoshi Nakata. During the 2003/4 season Carbone and Alberto Gilardino became the main two strikers at the club.

Carbone revealed that it was with Cesare Prandelli that he was taught about 'positional play' and hailed Prandelli as the greatest influence of his decision to one day become a manager.[15]

After a one-year stint with Vicenza, Carbone signed for a four-game guest contract with the Australian team Sydney FC as a potential replacement for Dwight Yorke, who was the club's previous marquee player. He capped his debut, against Adelaide United, with two assists and a goal. After his debut many believed he would be better than Yorke,[16] but during his third guest game he pulled a hamstring muscle that sidelined him for at least seven weeks. Carbone failed to reach an agreement with Sydney for a long-term contract, ending his short-lived career with Sydney.[17] In 2014, Carbone revealed his disappointment in the injury which ended his spell at the club and he revealed that he would one day like to return to the club as a Manager.[18]

Upon returning to Italy, Carbone joined northern side Pavia in August 2007 where he was appointed the Captain. In his first season back in the lower leagues, Carbone scored five goals in 29 appearances as Pavia finished fourth from bottom. In total he scored 31 goals in all competitions for the club and his goals helped Pavia avoid relegation.[19]

Carbone was often accused of being a mercenary due to his frequently transferring between clubs. He was, however, very popular with the fans of his clubs, particularly at Sheffield Wednesday and Bradford City. He also waived much of the money owed to him—approximately £3.32 million—after he had moved to Como, which helped City survive going into administration in 2002.

Coaching career[edit]

Pavia[edit]

After his retirement, Carbone accepted to stay at Pavia as youth coach, guiding the Berretti under-19 team.[20] On March 2011 he was then promoted as head coach to replace Gianluca Andrissi.[21] He guided Pavia to a safe place in the 2010–11 Lega Pro Prima Divisione standings, leading the club out of the relegation zone in his two months in charge of the first team.[22] At Pavia, Carbone was given the nickname 'Harry Potter' with Pavia fans believing Carbone had worked 'magic' both as a player and Manager to help them avoid relegation.[23]

Varese[edit]

After impressing as Pavia manager, On 16 June 2011 he was surprisingly announced as new head coach of Serie B club Varese, replacing local hero Giuseppe Sannino who left to become new boss of Serie A club Siena after guiding the club from Lega Pro Seconda Divisione to a spot in the promotion playoffs during his last season in charge.[1][22] Joining Carbone as part of Carbone's management team at Varese was ex Inter Milan player Mauro Milanese who joined the club as Sporting Director.[24]

On 1 October 2011 he was sacked[25] and replaced by Rolando Maran.[26]

Saint-Christophe Vallée d’Aoste[edit]

After being sacked by Varese, on 29 October 2012 he was installed as the new coach of Saint-Christophe Vallée d’Aoste in Lega Pro Seconda Divisione in place of the sacked Giovanni Zichella. Saint-Christophe Vallée d’Aoste were bottom of the table before Carbone took charge and he led them up the table. Carbone eventually resigned as Saint-Christophe Vallée d’Aoste Head Coach due to 'restrictions placed upon him'.

Pursuing a Career in England[edit]

After leaving Saint-Christophe Vallée d’Aoste Carbone, who was a highly rated young manager, revealed he had turned down 3-4 job offers to manage in Italy, due to him wanting to pursue a Management career in England.[27] Carbone had also revealed that current Italy national football team manager Cesare Prandelli had endorsed Carbone to become a top manager.

After being linked with the managerial vacancy at Sheffield Wednesday in December 2013, Carbone proclaimed that he wanted to manage the club, On 10 January 2014, Carbone appeared on Sky Sports programme 'The Fantasy Football Club' presented by his Ex-Aston Villa teamate Paul Merson and revealed that he was still interested in the role.[28] However the club appointed caretaker manager Stuart Gray as full-time manager on 25 January after a string of impressive results.[29]

Leeds United Role[edit]

In April 2014 Massimo Cellino announced he was giving Carbone the opportunity to 'help rebuild the academy' at Leeds United, and Carbone joined the youth team set up at Thorp Arch.[30]

On 14 May 2014, Carbone announced on his official Twitter page that his job title is 'Special Consultant to the Board of Directors for sport matters including Facilities & Academy'.[31] The club confirmed Benito Carbone's position at the club in a statement on the clubs official website on 15 May, they confirmed that Carbone 'will be involved with all football matters, including both the first team and the Academy'.[2][32][33]

Trivia[edit]

When Carbone was at Napoli, due to his admiration for the number 10 shirt and also of his idols Diego Maradona and Roberto Baggio, Carbone had specially made shin pads for the rest of his career which featured a picture of Maradona on the left shin pad, and a picture of Baggio on the right shin pad.[34]

On July 8, 2014, Carbone played in a charity team for his former club Inter Milan vs a Real Madrid Legends team for the 2014 Corazón Classic Match for charity, Inter Milan Forever featured the likes of Javier Zanetti, Luis Figo, Ivan Cordoba, Francesco Toldo, Dino Baggio and Olivier Dacourt. Real Madrid featured the likes of Zinedine Zidane, Fernando Hierro, Emilio Butragueño and Ivan Zamorano.[35][36][37]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Benny Carbone nuovo tecnico del Varese" (in Italian). ANSA.it. 16 June 2011. Retrieved 16 June 2011. 
  2. ^ a b "STATEMENT: BENITO CARBONE. Carbone to join staff at Elland Road…". Leeds United Official Website. 15 May 2014. Retrieved 15 May 2014. 
  3. ^ "Sheff Wed: Beni bust-up". BBC News. 3 August 1999. Retrieved 26 April 2010. 
  4. ^ Edwards, John (7 January 2013). "EXCLUSIVE: Benito Carbone reveals the incredible financial sacrifice he made just to keep Bradford alive: 'It cost me £3m but I could not kill my club'". Daily Mail (London). 
  5. ^ "Carbone magic kills off Leeds". BBC News. 30 January 2000. Retrieved 26 April 2010. 
  6. ^ "Carbone lights up Villa Park". BBC News. 11 December 1999. Retrieved 8 August 2012. 
  7. ^ "Villa destroy Goodison's dream". BBC News. 20 February 2000. Retrieved 8 August 2012. 
  8. ^ "Chelsea claim FA Cup glory". BBC News. 20 May 2000. Retrieved 26 April 2014. 
  9. ^ "FIORENTINA EYE ITALIAN STAR". Sky Sports. 20 May 2000. Retrieved 20 May 2000. 
  10. ^ "Bradford City v Swansea City: Carbone calls for Bantams passion". BBC Sport. 18 February 2013. Retrieved 18 February 2013. 
  11. ^ "Carbone happy at Bradford". BBC News. 14 July 2001. Retrieved 26 April 2010. 
  12. ^ "Derby see off Villa". BBC. 22 December 2001. Retrieved 24 October 2009. 
  13. ^ "Old boys haunt Villa". BBC. 6 April 2002. Retrieved 24 October 2009. 
  14. ^ "Benito Carbone insists he couldn’t be the player who made Bradford City fold". METRO. 8 January 2013. Retrieved 8 January 2013. 
  15. ^ "Benito Carbone reveals the incredible financial sacrifice he made just to keep Bradford alive: 'It cost me £3m but I could not kill my club". Daily Mail. 7 January 2013. Retrieved 7 January 2013. 
  16. ^ Is Benito the Dwight Choice SMH.com.au
  17. ^ Sydney FC-Carbone Fail To Reach Deal SMH.com.au
  18. ^ "CARBONE DREAMS OF COACHING SYDNEY". The World Game. 10 March 2014. Retrieved 10 March 2014. 
  19. ^ http://www.tuttocalciatori.net/Carbone_Benito
  20. ^ "Carbone ha detto stop" (in Italian). Libero Sport. 11 June 2010. Retrieved 16 July 2011. 
  21. ^ "UFFICIALE: Benny Carbone nuovo allenatore del Pavia" (in Italian). TuttoMercatoWeb. 15 March 2011. Retrieved 16 July 2011. 
  22. ^ a b "CARBONE: PAVIA TI AMO, MA VADO AL VARESE" (in Italian). Il Mondo di Pavia. 16 June 2011. Retrieved 16 July 2011. 
  23. ^ "Pavia-Benny Carbone: fine di una grande storia d'amore" (in Italian). Tutto Legapro. 15 August 2011. Retrieved 15 August 2011. 
  24. ^ http://www.thefootballexpress.co.uk/2011/09/benito-carbone-new-cycle-and-new-struggles-at-varese/
  25. ^ http://www.laprovinciadivarese.it/stories/Cronaca/508758/
  26. ^ http://www.laprovinciadivarese.it/stories/Cronaca/508759/
  27. ^ "Sheffield Wednesday: One day I want to manage the Owls, says Beni". The Star. 8 October 2013. Retrieved 8 October 2013. 
  28. ^ "The Fantasy Football Club - Carbone". Sky Sports. 10 January 2014. Retrieved 10 January 2014. 
  29. ^ "Wednesday legend Carbone wants the Hillsborough hotseat". Daily Mail. 3 December 2013. Retrieved 3 December 2013. 
  30. ^ Yorkshire Post, 28 April 2014
  31. ^ Benito Carbone Official Twitter @CarboBenny10, 14 May 2014
  32. ^ "Leeds United appoint Benito Carbone as consultant". BBC Sport. 15 May 2014. Retrieved 15 May 2014. 
  33. ^ "Benito Carbone takes up consultancy role at Leeds". Sky Sports. 15 May 2014. Retrieved 15 May 2014. 
  34. ^ "BY FANTASISTA10 FANTASISTA CULTURE FEBRUARY 25, 2014 REVEALED: JUST WHO WORE MARADONA & BAGGIO SHIN-PAD TRIBUTES?". Yorkshire Evening Post. 26 April 2014. Retrieved 26 April 2014. 
  35. ^ "CORAZON CLASSIC MATCH 2014: REAL MADRID LEYENDAS V INTER FOREVER". Inter Milan Official Site. 24 April 2014. Retrieved 26 April 2014. 
  36. ^ "The best moments from the Corazón Classic match". Real Madrid Official Website. 6 June 2014. Retrieved 6 June 2014. 
  37. ^ "2-2: Charity event at the Bernabéu". Real Madrid Official Website. 8 June 2014. Retrieved 8 June 2014. 

External links[edit]