Benning M. Bean

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Benning Moulton Bean
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New Hampshire's At-Large district
In office
March 4, 1833 – March 3, 1837
Preceded by John Brodhead
Succeeded by Charles G. Atherton
Member of the New Hampshire Senate
In office
1831–1832
Member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives
In office
1827–1827
Member of the New Hampshire Senate
In office
1824–1826
Member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives
In office
1815–1823
Personal details
Born (1782-01-09)January 9, 1782
New Hampshire, New Hampshire, U.S.
Died February 6, 1866(1866-02-06) (aged 84)
Moultonborough, New Hampshire, U.S.
Resting place Bean Cemetery
Moultonborough, New Hampshire
Citizenship US
Political party Jacksonian
Spouse(s) Eliza Ramsey Bean
Lydia Adams Bean
Children John Q. A. Bean
Benjamin F. Bean
A. A. Bean
George L. Bean
William E. Bean
Hannah J. Bean
Profession Farmer
Politician

Benning Moulton Bean (January 9, 1782 – February 6, 1866) was an American farmer and politician. He served as a United States Representative from New Hampshire, as a member of the New Hampshire Senate, and as a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives.

Early life and career[edit]

Born in Moultonborough, New Hampshire, Bean was the son of Moody Bean.[1] He attended public schools, received private tutoring and became involved in teaching and agricultural pursuits.

Political career[edit]

He served as Selectman for Moultonborough from 1811–1829 and from 1832–1838.[2] He was Justice of the Peace in 1816,[3] and trustee of Sandwich Academy in 1824.[4] A member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives from 1815–1823, Bean also served in the New Hampshire Senate from 1824–1826.[5] He served as a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives again in 1827. In 1829, he was member of the Governor's council.[6]

Bean served in the New Hampshire Senate again in 1831 and 1832, and was president of the State Senate in 1832.[7] He was elected as a Jacksonian candidate to the Twenty-third and Twenty-fourth Congresses, serving in Congress March 4, 1833 – March 3, 1837. During his time in Congress, Bean was an advocate for temperance and helped form the Congressional Temperance Society with George N. Briggs in 1833. He served as president of the society.[8] He declined to be a candidate for renomination in 1836, and resumed teaching and agricultural pursuits in Moultonborough,

Death[edit]

Bean died in Moultonborough, Carroll County, New Hampshire on February 6, 1866 (age 84 years, 28 days). He is interred at Bean Cemetery in Moultonborough.[9]

Personal life[edit]

On May 31, 1812, Bean married Eliza Ramsey. They had one daughter who died in childhood. After Eliza's death, he married Lydia Adams on October 30, 1817. They had six sons and four daughters together, including John Q. A. Bean, Benjamin F. Bean, A. A. Bean, George L. Bean, William E. Bean and Hannah J. Bean.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Metcalf, Henry Harrison and McClintock, John Norris (1882). The Granite Monthly: A New Hampshire Magazine Devoted to History, Biography, Literature, and State Progress, Volume 5. H.H. Metcalf. p. 167. 
  2. ^ "Bean Cemetery". Moultonborough Historical Society. Retrieved January 21, 2014. 
  3. ^ "The New-Hampshire annual register". The New-Hampshire annual register, and United States calendar. Retrieved January 21, 2014. 
  4. ^ Parker, Benjamin Franklin (1901). History of Wolfeborough (New Hampshire). Press of Caustic & Claflin. p. 406. 
  5. ^ United States. Government Printing Office (1918). Congressional serial set. United States. Government Printing Office. p. 466. 
  6. ^ Merrill, Georgia Drew (1889). History of Carroll County, New Hampshire. W.A. Fergusson & Company. 
  7. ^ "Benning Moulton Bean". History of Carroll County, New Hampshire. Retrieved 19 January 2014. 
  8. ^ Merrill, Georgia Drew (1889). History of Carroll County, New Hampshire. W.A. Fergusson & Company. p. 404. 
  9. ^ Spencer, Thomas E. (1998). Where They're Buried: A Directory Containing More Than Twenty Thousand Names of Notable Persons Buried in American Cemeteries, with Listings of Many Prominent People who Were Cremated. Genealogical Publishing Com. p. 221. 
  10. ^ Metcalf, Henry Harrison and McClintock, John Norris (1882). The Granite Monthly: A New Hampshire Magazine Devoted to History, Biography, Literature, and State Progress, Volume 5. H.H. Metcalf. p. 167. 

External links[edit]


 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
John Brodhead
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New Hampshire's at-large congressional district

1833 – 1837
Succeeded by
Charles G. Atherton