Benno Möhlmann

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Benno Möhlmann
Benno Möhlmann 2012 2.jpg
Möhlmann in 2012.
Personal information
Full name Benno Hans Möhlmann
Date of birth (1954-08-01) 1 August 1954 (age 60)
Place of birth Lohne, West Germany
Height 1.78 m (5 ft 10 in)
Playing position Midfielder
Club information
Current team
FSV Frankfurt (Manager)
Youth career
0000–1972 Blau-Weiß Lohne
1972–1974 Preußen Münster
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1974–1978 Preußen Münster 150 (27)
1978–1987 Werder Bremen 230 (33)
1987–1989 Hamburger SV 25 (2)
Total 405 (62)
National team
1982 West Germany U-21 1 (0)
1982 West Germany Olympic 1 (0)
Teams managed
1989–1990 Hamburger SV (assistant)
1992–1995 Hamburger SV
1995–1997 Eintracht Braunschweig
1997–2000 Greuther Fürth
2000–2004 Arminia Bielefeld
2004–2007 Greuther Fürth
2007–2008 Eintracht Braunschweig
2008–2009 Greuther Fürth
2010–2011 Ingolstadt 04
2011– FSV Frankfurt
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.
† Appearances (Goals).

Benno Hans Möhlmann (born 1 August 1954) is a retired German footballer who currently manages FSV Frankfurt.

Career[edit]

Möhlmann began his professional career in 1974 as a midfielder with SC Preußen Münster in 2. Bundesliga-Nord. In 1978 he moved to SV Werder Bremen in the Bundesliga. He remained with Bremen until 1987 when he moved to Hamburger SV, finishing his playing career in 1989. In total, Möhlmann played in 255 Bundesliga matches, scoring 35 goals.

Managerial career[edit]

Möhlmann's managing career started at Hamburger SV in 1992. From 1995 until 1997 Möhlmann was manager of Eintracht Braunschweig, then Möhlmann moved to Greuther Fürth, staying at that club until 2000. From 2000 until 2004, Möhlmann was manager of Arminia Bielefeld, winning promotion to 1. Bundesliga in 2002, but the team was immediately relegated the year after. Möhlmann was left in February 2004 and returned to Greuther Fürth.[1] Möhlmann became manager of Eintracht Braunschweig in July 2007.[2] After a string of unsatisfying performances by the team, Möhlmann stepped down as manager in May 2008.[2] In July 2008, Möhlmann became for the third time the manager of Greuther Fürth, but he cancelled his contract on 20 December 2009.[3] On 7 November 2010, Möhlmann was appointed manager of FC Ingolstadt 04.[4] After almost exactly one year with Ingolstadt, Möhlmann was sacked as manager on 9 November 2011, after losing four of the five previous matches.[5] Möhlmann became manager of FSV Frankfurt on 21 December 2011.[6]

Managerial statistics[edit]

As of 24 August 2014
Team From To Record
G W D L Win % Ref.
Hamburger SV 23 September 1992[7] 5 October 1995[7] 109 34 34 41 31.19 [7]
Eintracht Braunschweig 1 July 1995[8] 30 June 1997[8] 59 39 9 11 66.10
Greuther Fürth 15 October 1997[2] 21 October 2000[2] 108 40 39 29 37.04
Arminia Bielefeld 23 October 2000[2] 17 February 2004[1] 119 43 33 43 36.13
Greuther Fürth 17 February 2004[1] 30 June 2007[2] 122 57 25 40 46.72
Eintracht Braunschweig 1 July 2007[8] 12 May 2008[8] 34 11 13 10 32.35 [8]
Greuther Fürth 27 May 2008[9] 20 December 2009[3] 55 25 9 21 45.45
Ingolstadt 04 7 November 2010[4] 9 November 2011[5] 39 13 12 14 33.33
FSV Frankfurt 21 December 2011[6] Present 91 35 21 35 38.46
Total 736 297 195 244 40.35

Honours[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Möhlmann wechselt nach Fürth". kicker (in German). 17 February 2004. Retrieved 5 March 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f "Benno Möhlmann" (in German). kicker. Retrieved 5 March 2013. 
  3. ^ a b "Möhlmann nicht mehr Trainer in Ronhof". kicker (in German). 20 December 2009. Retrieved 5 March 2013. 
  4. ^ a b "Möhlmann übernimmt in Ingolstadt". DFL (in German). 7 November 2010. Retrieved 7 November 2010. 
  5. ^ a b "FCI beurlaubt Möhlmann". DFL (in German). 9 November 2011. Retrieved 9 November 2011. 
  6. ^ a b ""Wunschkandidat" Möhlmann ist da". kicker (in German). 21 December 2011. Retrieved 5 March 2013. 
  7. ^ a b c "Hamburger SV" (in German). kicker. Retrieved 20 January 2014. 
  8. ^ a b c d e "Eintracht Braunschweig" (in German). kicker. Retrieved 20 January 2014. 
  9. ^ "Hack: Möhlmann "einzige Option"". kicker (in German). 27 May 2008. Retrieved 5 March 2013. 

External links[edit]