Bentall procedure

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

A Bentall procedure is a cardiac surgery operation involving composite graft replacement of the aortic valve, aortic root and ascending aorta, with re-implantation of the coronary arteries into the graft. This operation is used to treat combined aortic valve and ascending aorta disease, including lesions associated with Marfan syndrome. The Bentall procedure was first described in 1968 by Hugh Bentall and Antony De Bono.[1]

Alternatives[edit]

The Bentall operation entails replacement of the aortic valve, aortic root and ascending aorta, but other operations may be used when all three components are not involved.

  • Normal aortic root: The re-implantation of the coronary arteries is prone to complications, and aortic root replacement should be avoided when possible. The aortic valve and ascending aorta can be replaced in separate steps, without root replacement.
  • Normal aortic valve with annular dilation and ascending aneurysm (frequently found in Marfan syndrome): Artificial heart valves may wear out or require anticoagulation, and a valve-sparing aortic root replacement allows replacement of the aortic root +/- ascending aorta, while allowing a person to keep their own aortic valve and avoid the problems of aortic valve replacement.

Indications[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bentall H., De Bono A. (1968). "A technique for complete replacement of the ascending aorta". Thorax 23 (4): 338–9. doi:10.1136/thx.23.4.338. PMC 471799. PMID 5664694. 

External links[edit]