Bergen International Film Festival

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Bergen International Film Festival
BIFF 4f norsk logo.png
Location Bergen, Norway
Founded 2000
Language Norwegian & English
http://www.biff.no/

The Bergen International Film Festival (BIFF) is a film festival held annually in October in Bergen, Norway since 2000, and is the largest film festival in the nation in number of films. The 11th edition of the festival in 2010 featured 150 films in the program, a new record. The festival leader is Tor Fosse, and BIFF is owned by Bergen Cinema.

The festivals main venue is Bergen Cinema's Magnus Barefoot Cinema Centre, with additional screenings taking place at the local art film theatre at Georgernes Verft and at the student cinema at Kvarteret.

History[edit]

The Magnus Barefoot Cinema Centre i Bergen, the main venue of BIFF.

In 2000, Bergen was a European Capital of Culture. Due to the occasion, Bergen Cinema arranged Bergen International Film Festival, with the most important films from the festival circuit of the year and many sneak previews of movies already picked up for Norwegian distribution. BIFF was one of the most successful events to take place during the celebration of the Cultural City with almost 20,000 visitors, and was arranged again the year after.

Over the years the festival has grown to be one of the biggest in Norway, with over 45,000 attending guests in 2010.

Programmes[edit]

Bergen International Film Festival is organised in various sections:

  • Checkpoints, the main program at BIFF, hosted with the Rafto Foundation for Human Rights, consisting of documentaries focusing on human rights. Since 2010, a jury has selected a winner.
  • International Documentary Program, with a special selection competing for the best international documentary award.
  • Norwegian Documentary Program, with a special selection competing for awards for best Norwegian documentary and best Norwegian short documentary.
  • Norwegian Short Film Competition, a special program of short films, where filmmakers have to apply before being accepted.

BIFF and education[edit]

Bergen International Film Festival has an extensive program for high school and junior high school students in Bergen. BIFFs offers schools in the area to participate in two different programs:

BIFF for Schools[edit]

The festival offers free showing of documentaries that covers important subjects in history, democracy and human rights. BIFF also tries to bring filmmakers and even the characters the films portray to the screenings, making it possible for the students to converse with the talent afterwards. In 2010, former mayors of Bogotá, Antanas Mockus and Enrique Peñalosa held strong appeals to students of the power of local democracy after the showings of Bogota Change.

The School Film Festival[edit]

BIFF also offers a crash course film school for junior high schools, with professional filmmakers holding seminars. The festival then make camera and editing stations available for the students, and award one school each year for best student film.

Awards at Bergen International Film Festival[edit]

Checkpoints[edit]

Awarded since 2010 and is main prize at BIFF, given to a documentary that focuses on human rights.

Best International Documentary[edit]

Awarded since 2004, after BIFF started to shift its focus more over to documentaries. The prize is 50,000 NOK, since 2013 awarded by NRK.

Best Norwegian Documentary[edit]

Awarded since 2011. The prize is 40,000 NOK, since 2013 awarded by NRK.

  • 2011: Folk ved fjorden, directed by Øyvind Sandberg
  • 2012: De andre, directed by Margareth Olin
  • 2013: Banaz: A Love Story, directed by Deeyah Khan

Best Norwegian Short Documentary[edit]

Awarded since 2011. The prize is 10,000 NOK, since 2013 awarded by NRK.

  • 2011: Selger 327, directed by Kari Anne Moe
  • 2012: Havet sølv, directed by Are Pilskog
  • 2013: Du velger selv, directed by Kajsa Næss

The Audience Award[edit]

Youth Jury's Documentary Award[edit]

A prize awarded since 2004 by a jury consisting of high school students that choose from the films that is a part of the BIFF for Schools program.

Best Norwegian Short Film[edit]

Awarded since 2004.

  • 2003: Fear Less, directed by Therese Jacobsen
  • 2004: The Bible, directed by Bjørn Amundlien
  • 2005: Drømme kan du gjøre senere, directed by Thomas A. Østbye
  • 2006: Drømmehuset, directed by Øystein Mamen
  • 2007: Bo jo cie kochom (Fordi jeg elsker deg), directed by Gine Therese Grønner
  • 2008: Ekornet, directed by Stian Einar Forgaard
  • 2009: Skylappjenta, directed by Iram Haq
  • 2010: Jenny, directed by Ingvild Søderlind
  • 2011: Asyl, directed by Jørn Utkilen
  • 2012: Å vokte fjellet, directed by Izer Aliu
  • 2013: Money Back Please, directed by Even Hafnor

Young Talent Award[edit]

Awarded since 2005, with a prize of 20,000 NOK.

  • 2005: Aleksander Nordaas
  • 2006: Morvary Samaré and Astrid Schau-Larsen
  • 2007: Tor Kristian Liseth
  • 2008: Olav Øyehaug
  • 2009: Espen Faugstad and Eivind Nilsen
  • 2010: Kedy Hassani
  • 2011: Frida Eggum Michaelsen
  • 2012: Are Pilskog
  • 2013: Mads Andersen

Cinema Extraordinare (discontinued)[edit]

The former main award at Bergen International Film Festival, awarded to the best feature film 2000-2011. The prize has had its present name since 2007. 2000-2005 it was called The Jury's Award, and 2006-2007 it was named The Norwegian Film Institute's Import Award, with the prize being Norwegian distribution.

Best Scandinavian Music Video (discontinued)[edit]

Awarded 2010-2013.

  • 2010: Torgny - "The Only Game", directed by Emil Trier  Norway
  • 2011:
  • 2012: Todd Terje - "Inspector Norse", directed by Kristoffer Borgli  Norway
  • 2013: The Knife - a Tooth for an Eye,  Sweden

The Critic's Award (discontinued)[edit]

Only awarded once, by the film journalists attending the festival in 2003.

The Festival by year[edit]

Coordinates: 60°23′29.4″N 5°19′6.9″E / 60.391500°N 5.318583°E / 60.391500; 5.318583

External links[edit]