Bergenfield, New Jersey

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Bergenfield, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Bergenfield
Cooper's Pond
Cooper's Pond
Map highlighting Bergenfield's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey
Map highlighting Bergenfield's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Bergenfield, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Bergenfield, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°55′20″N 73°59′53″W / 40.922334°N 73.998001°W / 40.922334; -73.998001Coordinates: 40°55′20″N 73°59′53″W / 40.922334°N 73.998001°W / 40.922334; -73.998001[1][2]
Country  United States of America
State  New Jersey
County Bergen
Incorporated June 25, 1894
Government[6]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Norman Schmelz (term ends December 31, 2015)[3][4]
 • Clerk Colleen Naumov[5]
Area[2]
 • Total 2.885 sq mi (7.473 km2)
 • Land 2.876 sq mi (7.448 km2)
 • Water 0.009 sq mi (0.024 km2)  0.33%
Area rank 344th of 566 in state
30th of 70 in county[2]
Elevation[7] 66 ft (20 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 26,764
 • Estimate (2013[11]) 27,191
 • Rank 89th of 566 in state
7th of 70 in county[12]
 • Density 9,306.5/sq mi (3,593.3/km2)
 • Density rank 39th of 566 in state
11th of 70 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07621[13][14]
Area code(s) 201[15]
FIPS code 3400305170[16][2][17]
GNIS feature ID 0885157[18][2]
Website www.bergenfieldboro.com
Bergenfield's main road, Washington Avenue

Bergenfield is a borough in Bergen County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 26,764,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 517 (+2.0%) from the 26,247 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 1,789 (+7.3%) from the 24,458 counted in the 1990 Census.[19]

Bergenfield was formed on the basis of a referendum held on June 25, 1894, from portions of Englewood Township and Palisades Township.[20][21][22] The borough was formed during the "Boroughitis" phenomenon then sweeping through Bergen County, in which 26 boroughs were formed in the county in 1894 alone.[23]

New Jersey Monthly magazine ranked Bergenfield as its 211st best place to live in its 2010 rankings of the "Best Places To Live" in New Jersey.[24] The magazine ranked Bergenfield as its 231st best place to live in its 2008 rankings of the "Best Places To Live".[25]

Geography[edit]

Bergenfield is located at 40°55′20″N 73°59′53″W / 40.922334°N 73.998001°W / 40.922334; -73.998001 (40.922334,-73.998001). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 2.885 square miles (7.473 km2), of which, 2.876 square miles (7.448 km2) of it was land and 0.009 square miles (0.024 km2) of it (0.33%) was water.[1][2]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 729
1910 1,991 173.1%
1920 3,667 84.2%
1930 8,816 140.4%
1940 10,275 16.5%
1950 17,647 71.7%
1960 27,203 54.2%
1970 29,000 6.6%
1980 25,568 −11.8%
1990 24,458 −4.3%
2000 26,247 7.3%
2010 26,764 2.0%
Est. 2013 27,191 [11] 1.6%
Population sources:
1900-1920[26] 1900-1910[27]
1910-1930[28] 1900-2010[29][30][31]
2000[32][33] 2010[8][9][10]

Bergenfield has been called the "Little Manila" of Bergen County.[34][35] Of the 14,224 Filipino population in the county as a whole enumerated in the 2000 Census, 3,133 (22% of the county total) lived in Bergenfield.[36][37] By the 2010 Census, 4,569 Bergenfield residents (17.1% of the population) listed themselves as being of Filipino ancestry.[8]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 26,764 people, 8,852 households, and 6,816 families residing in the borough. The population density was 9,306.5 per square mile (3,593.3 /km2). There were 9,200 housing units at an average density of 3,199.1 per square mile (1,235.2 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 52.42% (14,029) White, 7.70% (2,060) Black or African American, 0.31% (84) Native American, 25.60% (6,851) Asian, 0.05% (13) Pacific Islander, 10.12% (2,709) from other races, and 3.80% (1,018) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 26.52% (7,097) of the population.[8]

There were 8,852 households, of which 35.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.7% were married couples living together, 13.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.0% were non-families. 19.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.02 and the average family size was 3.46.[8]

In the borough, 23.9% of the population were under the age of 18, 8.6% from 18 to 24, 26.1% from 25 to 44, 28.4% from 45 to 64, and 13.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39.0 years. For every 100 females there were 91.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.8 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $82,546 (with a margin of error of +/- $6,568) and the median family income was $99,963 (+/- $5,602). Males had a median income of $52,891 (+/- $2,058) versus $50,443 (+/- $2,598) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $35,034 (+/- $2,133). About 3.9% of families and 5.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.2% of those under age 18 and 7.1% of those age 65 or over.[38]

Same-sex couples headed 62 households in 2010, an increase from the 51 counted in 2000.[39]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 26,247 people, 8,981 households, and 6,753 families residing in the borough. The population density was 9,065.4 people per square mile (3,494.5/km2). There were 9,147 housing units at an average density of 3,159.3 per square mile (1,217.8/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 62.90% White, 6.90% African American, 0.24% Native American, 20.41% Asian (5,357 Asian), 0.02% Pacific Islander, 6.47% from other races, and 3.06% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 17.05% of the population.[32][33]

There were 8,981 households out of which 36.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.8% were married couples living together, 11.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.8% were non-families. 20.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.92 and the average family size was 3.41.[32][33]

In the borough the population was spread out with 24.8% under the age of 18, 7.3% from 18 to 24, 31.0% from 25 to 44, 23.2% from 45 to 64, and 13.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 91.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.2 males.[32][33]

The median income for a household in the borough was $62,172, and the median income for a family was $71,187. Males had a median income of $42,074 versus $35,137 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $24,706. About 2.6% of families and 3.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.6% of those under age 18 and 3.8% of those age 65 or over.[32][33]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Bergenfield is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[6]

As of 2014, the mayor of Bergenfield is Republican Norman Schmelz, who was sworn in on as the new mayor in November 2013 and will serve until his term ends, on December 31, 2015.[40] Schmelz was elected to fill the seat of Timothy Driscoll, who had died in office in March 2013, defeating Carlos Aguasvivas who had filled the seat on an interim basis since being appointed by the council in April.[41][42]

Members of the Borough Council are Council President Ora C. Kornbluth (D, 2016), Thomas A. Lodato (D, 2015), Hernando Rivera (D, 2015), Kathy Sahlberg (R, 2014; elected in November 2013 to fill the unexpired term of Carlos Aguasvivas), Charles K. Steinel (D, 2016) and P. Christopher "Chris" Tully (D, 2014).[3][42][43][44][45][46]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Bergenfield is located in the 5th Congressional District[47] and is part of New Jersey's 38th state legislative district.[9][48][49] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Bergenfield had been in the 37th state legislative district.[50]

New Jersey's Fifth Congressional District is represented by Scott Garrett (R, Wantage Township).[51] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[52][53] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[54][55]

The 38th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Robert M. Gordon (D, Fair Lawn) and in the General Assembly by Tim Eustace (D, Maywood) and Joseph Lagana (D, Paramus).[56][57] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[58] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[59]

Bergen County is governed by a directly elected County Executive, with legislative functions performed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders.[60] The County Executive is Kathleen Donovan (R, Rutherford; term ends December 31, 2014).[61] The seven freeholders are elected at-large in partisan elections on a staggered basis, with two or three seats coming up for election each year, with a Chairman, Vice Chairman and Chairman Pro Tempore selected from among its members at a reorganization meeting held each January.[62] As of 2014, Bergen County's Freeholders are Freeholder Chairman David L. Ganz (D, 2014; Fair Lawn),[63] Vice Chairwoman Joan Voss (D, 2014; Fort Lee),[64] Chairman Pro Tempore John A. Felice (R, 2016; River Edge),[65] Maura R. DeNicola (R, 2016; Franklin Lakes),[66] Steve Tanelli (D, 2015; North Arlington)[67] James J. Tedesco, III (D, 2015; Paramus)[68] and Tracy Silna Zur (D, 2015; Franklin Lakes).[69][70] Countywide constitutional officials are County Clerk John S. Hogan (D, Northvale),[71] Sheriff Michael Saudino (R),[72] Surrogate Michael R. Dressler (D, Cresskill)[73][74][60]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 14,083 registered voters in Bergenfield, of which 5,139 (36.5% vs. 31.7% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 2,151 (15.3% vs. 21.1%) were registered as Republicans and 6,782 (48.2% vs. 47.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 11 voters registered to other parties.[75] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 52.6% (vs. 57.1% in Bergen County) were registered to vote, including 69.2% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 73.7% countywide).[75][76]

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 6,665 votes here (62.7% vs. 54.8% countywide), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 3,773 votes (35.5% vs. 43.5%) and other candidates with 91 votes (0.9% vs. 0.9%), among the 10,624 ballots cast by the borough's 15,285 registered voters, for a turnout of 69.5% (vs. 70.4% in Bergen County).[77][78] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 6,410 votes here (57.6% vs. 53.9% countywide), ahead of Republican John McCain with 4,561 votes (40.9% vs. 44.5%) and other candidates with 70 votes (0.6% vs. 0.8%), among the 11,138 ballots cast by the borough's 14,721 registered voters, for a turnout of 75.7% (vs. 76.8% in Bergen County).[79][80] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 5,768 votes here (54.8% vs. 51.7% countywide), ahead of Republican George W. Bush with 4,657 votes (44.3% vs. 47.2%) and other candidates with 57 votes (0.5% vs. 0.7%), among the 10,523 ballots cast by the borough's 13,954 registered voters, for a turnout of 75.4% (vs. 76.9% in the whole county).[81]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 3,463 ballots cast (53.9% vs. 48.0% countywide), ahead of Republican Chris Christie with 2,599 votes (40.5% vs. 45.8%), Independent Chris Daggett with 276 votes (4.3% vs. 4.7%) and other candidates with 29 votes (0.5% vs. 0.5%), among the 6,420 ballots cast by the borough's 14,488 registered voters, yielding a 44.3% turnout (vs. 50.0% in the county).[82]

Emergency services[edit]

Police[edit]

The Bergenfield Police Department provides police services to the Borough of Bergenfield. As of 2010, there are a total of 46 sworn officers in the department, 8 civilian telecommunicators, and three civilian Records Bureau employees.[83]

The force is responsible for all aspects of policing in the borough, including responding to fire and medical emergency calls. Each patrol car is equipped with a first aid kit, oxygen tank, and an Automated external defibrillator.

Fire[edit]

Started in 1905, the Bergenfield Fire Department (BFD) has three independent fire companies and a career staff.[84]

Ambulance[edit]

The Bergenfield Volunteer Ambulance Corps, Inc. (BVAC) was formed in 1941 as the "Bergenfield Volunteer Firemen's Ambulance Corps." Renamed the "Bergenfield Volunteer Ambulance Corps, Inc." and established as an organization independent of the Bergenfield Fire Department in 1981, BVAC is located at 1 Froelich Street in Bergenfield. The BVAC is a volunteer independent public emergency medical service. As such, they do not bill for services. BVAC is funded by donations from the public as well as limited funding from the borough.

The corps provides basic life support, and is staffed by certified Emergency Medical Technicians. BVAC has three ambulances and one fire-rehabilitation unit. Dispatching is provided by the Bergenfield Police Department's 9-1-1 center.

The primary jurisdiction of the BVAC is the Borough of Bergenfield, but the corps also responds to requests for mutual-aid from the neighboring First Aid Squads of Dumont, New Milford, and Teaneck.

The BVAC is a member of the New Jersey State First Aid Council.[85]

Education[edit]

Students in Kindergarten through twelfth grade are educated by the Bergenfield Public Schools. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[86]) are five elementary schools serving Kindergarten - 5th grade — Franklin Elementary School[87] with 396 students, Hoover Elementary School[88] with 191 students, Jefferson Elementary School[89] with 226 students, Lincoln Elementary School[90] with 324 students, and Washington Elementary School[91] with 246 students — Roy W. Brown Middle School[92] with 808 students in grades 6 - 8, and Bergenfield High School[93] with 1,190 students in grades 9-12.[94]

Public school students from the borough, and all of Bergen County, are eligible to attend the secondary education programs offered by the Bergen County Technical Schools, which include the Bergen County Academies in Hackensack, and the Bergen Tech campus in Teterboro or Paramus. The district offers programs on a shared-time or full-time basis, with admission based on a selective application process and tuition covered by the student's home school district.[95][96]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

The borough had a total of 60.50 miles (97.37 km) of roadways, of which 54.75 miles (88.11 km) are maintained by the municipality and 5.75 miles (9.25 km) by Bergen County.[97]

Main roads include Washington Avenue, Main Street and New Bridge Road.

Public transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit bus service is available to and from the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan on the 166, 167 routes and the George Washington Bridge Bus Station on the 186 route; and to other New Jersey communities served on the 753, 756 and 772 routes.[98] Until 1959, the New York Central Railroad operated passenger service through town on the West Shore Railroad. Service operated north along the Hudson River to Albany, New York and points west; and south to Weehawken Terminal.

Community[edit]

Bergenfield is one of a growing number of districts to form a SID (Special Improvement District). Bergenfield’s Special Improvement District stretches a mile along Washington Avenue from Teaneck to Dumont has been promoting the local businesses for several years. Its mission is to inform people about Bergenfield's shopping district and its over 50 international restaurants and food stores within one mile.[99]

On May 4, 2006, the ABC show Extreme Makeover: Home Edition came to Bergenfield to build a home for the Llanes family on New Bridge Road. The episode aired as the pre-season two-hour special originally broadcast on September 17, 2006.[100] The Llanes sold their home in 2012 and went to live with relatives because their taxes increased beyond their ability to pay, having risen from under $6,500 in 2007 to more than $15,000 five years later due to the increased assessed value of the home following the renovation.[101]

On July 22, 2007, the Team Bergenfield Roller Hockey Club, won the NARCh National Roller Hockey Championship defeating the Nor-Cal Patriots 6-5 in Estero, Florida. Team Bergenfield went 6-0-1 in the tournament en route to winning the Men's Silver Championship. The team formed in Bergenfield in 1994 and is currently one of the longest running roller hockey clubs in the United States.[102]

Several scenes for the Harlem Globetrotter 1954 film Go, Man, Go! were filmed at Franklin School, and along nearby Prospect Avenue. The actors Dane Clark (Abe Saperstein) and Patricia Breslin (Sylvia Saperstein) were involved. Many of the school's 5th grade boys were used as extras.[103]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Bergenfield include:

Corporate residents[edit]

  • Peter "Produce Pete" Napolitano (born c. 1941), grocer best known for his long-running television news produce segments and as a spokesman for the Pathmark supermarket chain who owns Napolitano's Produce in the borough.[123]
  • Prestige Records, a major producer of jazz recordings that was established in 1949, had its offices located here from the mid-1960s until its sale in 1972.[124]

In popular culture[edit]

The infamous group suicide of the "Bergenfield Four" took place in March 1987 and received worldwide attention.[125][126] The victims were four local high schoolers, ages sixteen to nineteen, and their mutual deaths by carbon monoxide were followed by a rash of copycat attempts.[127][128] The suicides are examined in sociological perspective in Donna Gaines' Teenage Wasteland (1998).[129][130] References in the arts include the Tom Russell song "Bergenfield" (1989).[131]

Snail Mail No More (2000) and P.S. Longer Letter Later (1998) take place in South Bergenfield, New Jersey. Ann M. Martin, the author of The Babysitters Club, found out about Bergenfield after a TV show and a movie for The Babysitters Club were filmed in Bergenfield, New Jersey instead of Stamford, Connecticut or Stony Brook, New York, and also met Amber Brown author Paula Danziger after 1990–1995. The two-book series takes place in 1998 and 1999, though P.S. was written in 1997 and Snail was published in 2000.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  3. ^ a b Bergenfield Officials, Borough of Bergenfield. Accessed July 14, 2014.
  4. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed November 19, 2013. As of date accessed, Timothy Driscoll is listed as mayor.
  5. ^ Borough Clerk's Office, Borough of Bergenfield. Accessed June 28, 2012.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 157.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Bergenfield, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 4, 2013.
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  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 15. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Bergenfield borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed May 16, 2012.
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  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Bergenfield, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed September 25, 2011.
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  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Bergenfield, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed September 1, 2013.
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  20. ^ History of Bergenfield, accessed January 4, 2007, states "Incorporated June 25, 1894"
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  35. ^ Pizarro, Max. "Rivas and Soriano champion Corzine and Christie respectively in Bergenfield", PolitickerNJ, July 12, 2009. Accessed August 26, 2013. "'I think people see him as an everyday man who is upset about the situation we are facing in New Jersey,' the reverend said today as he made the rounds with Christie from one vendor's booth to the next in a town dubbed Bergen's little Manila, home to 15,000 Filipino-Americans."
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  42. ^ a b Devencentis, Philip. "Republican elected mayor in Bergenfield", Twin-Boro News, November 6, 2013. Accessed November 19, 2013. "Republican Norman Schmelz defeated incumbent Democrat Carlos Aguasvivas by 347 votes - 2,832 to 2,485. In April, Aguasvivas was selected mayor by the Borough Council to succeed the late Mayor Timothy Driscoll.... Meanwhile, in a race for two three-year terms on the council, incumbent Democrats Ora Kornbluth and Charles Steinel turned back a challenge by Republicans John Long and Patricia Walsh-Nardini.... Finally, in a race to decide who will fill the one-year, unexpired council seat, which was vacated by Aguasvivas when he became mayor, Republican challenger Kathleen Sahlberg defeated incumbent Democrat Rafael Marte by 87 votes - 2,595 to 2,508."
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Sources[edit]

  • Westervelt, Frances A. (Frances Augusta), 1858-1942, History of Bergen County, New Jersey, 1630-1923, Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1923
  • Municipal Incorporations of the State of New Jersey (according to Counties) prepared by the Division of Local Government, Department of the Treasury (New Jersey); December 1, 1958.

External links[edit]