Berlin Secession

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Jury for the Berlin Secession 1908 exhibition. From the left: sculptors Fritz Klimsch and August Gaul, painters Walter Leistikow and Hans Baluschek, art dealer Paul Cassirer, painters Max Slevogt (sitting) and George Mosson(de) (standing), sculptor Max Kruse(de), painters Max Liebermann (sitting), Emil Rudolf Weiß(de) and Lovis Corinth.
Meeting of the Berlin Secession. From the left: Wilhelm Kohlhoff, Erich Büttner, Friedrich Scholz, Ernst Fritsch, Leo von König, Lovis Corinth, Ernst Oppler, Emil Orlik, Bruno Krauskopf, Charlotte Behrend-Corinth, Erich Waske, Franz Heckendorf

The Berlin Secession (German: Berliner Secession) was an art association founded by Berlin artists in 1898 as an alternative to the conservative state-run Association of Berlin Artists. That year the official salon jury rejected a landscape by Walter Leistikow, who was a key figure amongst a group of young artists interested in modern developments in art. Sixty-five young artists formed the initial membership of the Secession.

Max Liebermann was the Berlin Secession's first president, and he proposed to the Secession that Paul Cassirer and his cousin Bruno act as business managers.

In 1901 Bruno Cassirer resigned from the Secession, so that he could dedicate himself entirely to the Cassirer publishing firm. Paul took over the running of the Cassirer gallery, and supported various Secessionist artists including the sculptor Ernst Barlach and August Gaul, as well as promoting French Impressionism and Post-Impressionism.

The biggest conflict in the Berlin Secession was about the question if it should follow the new wave of Expressionism or not.

Famous members[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Siegfried & Dorothea Salzmann: Oskar Moll – Leben und Werk, München 1975, S. 63;
    Oskar Moll – Gemälde und Aquarelle, Ausst.-Kat, Landesmuseum Mainz, Mainz 1997, Michael Kirchner, Chronologie zu Leben und Werk, S. 9
  • Paret, Peter: The Berlin Secession. Modernism and its enemies in Imperial Germany, Harvard University Press 1980

External links[edit]