Berlin Township, New Jersey

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See also: Borough of Berlin, New Jersey
Berlin Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Berlin
Berlin Township highlighted in Camden County. Inset: Location of Camden County in the State of New Jersey.
Berlin Township highlighted in Camden County. Inset: Location of Camden County in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Berlin Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Berlin Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°48′26″N 74°55′27″W / 39.807116°N 74.924178°W / 39.807116; -74.924178Coordinates: 39°48′26″N 74°55′27″W / 39.807116°N 74.924178°W / 39.807116; -74.924178[1][2]
Country  United States of America
State  New Jersey
County Camden
Incorporated April 11, 1910
Named for Berlin, Germany
Government[5]
 • Type Faulkner Act (Small Municipality)
 • Mayor Phyllis Magazzu (term ends December 31, 2013)[3]
 • Clerk Cathy Underwood[4]
Area[2]
 • Total 3.238 sq mi (8.386 km2)
 • Land 3.232 sq mi (8.371 km2)
 • Water 0.006 sq mi (0.015 km2)  0.18%
Area rank 325th of 566 in state
11th of 37 in county[2]
Elevation[6] 167 ft (51 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 5,357
 • Estimate (2013[10]) 5,362
 • Rank 366th of 566 in state
21st of 37 in county[11]
 • Density 1,657.5/sq mi (640.0/km2)
 • Density rank 317th of 566 in state
31st of 37 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08091[12][13]
Area code(s) 856[14]
FIPS code 3400705470[15][2][16]
GNIS feature ID 0882152[17][2]
Website www.berlintwp.com

Berlin Township is a township in Camden County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 5,357,[7][8][9] reflecting an increase of 67 (+1.3%) from the 5,290 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 176 (-3.2%) from the 5,466 counted in the 1990 Census.[18]

Berlin was incorporated as a township on April 11, 1910, from portions of Waterford Township. Portions of the township were taken on March 29, 1927, to form Berlin Borough, based on the results of a referendum held on April 26, 1927.[19] The township was named for the city of Berlin, Germany.[20]

Geography[edit]

Berlin Township is located at 39°48′26″N 74°55′27″W / 39.807116°N 74.924178°W / 39.807116; -74.924178 (39.807116,-74.924178). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 3.238 square miles (8.386 km2), of which, 3.232 square miles (8.371 km2) of it was land and 0.006 square miles (0.015 km2) of it (0.18%) was water.[2][1]

The township borders Berlin Borough, Lindenwold, Voorhees Township, and Waterford Township. Berlin Township also borders Evesham Township in Burlington County.

Crow Foot, Reed Crossing and West Berlin are unincorporated communities located within the township.[21]

The township is one of 56 South Jersey municipalities that are included within the New Jersey Pinelands National Reserve, a protected natural area of unique ecology covering 1,100,000 acres (450,000 ha), that has been classified as a United States Biosphere Reserve and established by Congress in 1978 as the nation's first National Reserve.[22] Part of the borough is included in the state-designated Pinelands Area, which includes portions of Camden County, along with areas in Atlantic, Burlington, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester and Ocean counties.[23]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1910 1,611
1920 2,093 29.9%
1930 1,537 * −26.6%
1940 1,771 15.2%
1950 2,013 13.7%
1960 3,363 67.1%
1970 5,692 69.3%
1980 5,348 −6.0%
1990 5,466 2.2%
2000 5,290 −3.2%
2010 5,357 1.3%
Est. 2013 5,362 [10] 0.1%
Population sources: 1910-2000[24]
1910-1920[25] 1910[26] 1910-1930[27]
1930-1990[28] 2000[29][30] 2010[7][8][9]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[19]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 5,357 people, 1,975 households, and 1,363 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,657.5 per square mile (640.0 /km2). There were 2,069 housing units at an average density of 640.2 per square mile (247.2 /km2). The racial makeup of the township was 77.19% (4,135) White, 11.57% (620) Black or African American, 0.19% (10) Native American, 5.13% (275) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 3.79% (203) from other races, and 2.13% (114) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 8.29% (444) of the population.[7]

There were 1,975 households, of which 28.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.3% were married couples living together, 12.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.0% were non-families. 25.1% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.71 and the average family size was 3.25.[7]

In the township, 22.3% of the population were under the age of 18, 9.5% from 18 to 24, 26.4% from 25 to 44, 27.7% from 45 to 64, and 14.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39.3 years. For every 100 females there were 99.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.4 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $61,029 (with a margin of error of +/- $8,347) and the median family income was $70,777 (+/- $6,678). Males had a median income of $50,286 (+/- $4,262) versus $41,250 (+/- $8,550) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $26,184 (+/- $2,541). About 4.6% of families and 5.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.0% of those under age 18 and 1.3% of those age 65 or over.[31]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 5,290 people, 1,893 households, and 1,368 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,628.9 people per square mile (628.5/km²). There were 2,009 housing units at an average density of 618.6 per square mile (238.7/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 82.46% White, 11.87% African American, 0.17% Native American, 2.70% Asian, 0.08% Pacific Islander, 1.21% from other races, and 1.51% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.80% of the population.[29][30]

There were 1,893 households out of which 34.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.1% were married couples living together, 12.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.7% were non-families. 22.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.78 and the average family size was 3.28.[29][30]

In the township the population was spread out with 25.8% under the age of 18, 8.5% from 18 to 24, 30.3% from 25 to 44, 22.9% from 45 to 64, and 12.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 99.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.3 males.[29][30]

The median income for a household in the township was $54,448, and the median income for a family was $61,042. Males had a median income of $37,240 versus $28,703 for females. The per capita income for the township was $22,178. About 4.8% of families and 5.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.6% of those under age 18 and 6.7% of those age 65 or over.[29][30]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

In 1973, Berlin Township changed its form of government from the Township form to a Faulkner Act Small Municipality form, and now operates under plan 3 of the Small Municipality form, as implemented on January 1, 1988, by direct petition.[32] Its current structure includes four Council members and a Mayor, all elected at large for three-year terms. The candidates run in partisan elections at regular primary and general election time. Independent candidates, having declared their intentions at primary time, run only in the general election.[5]

This type of government is a “strong mayor” form in which the Mayor, as chief executive, is responsible for all administrative functions. The Mayor presides at Council meetings, voting and participating as a member of Council. The Mayor appoints, with Council’s approval, the following: Tax Assessor, Tax Collector, Clerk, Treasurer, Zoning Officer, Construction Official, Court Administrator, Attorney and Engineer. The Mayor is responsible for the budget; enforcing the charter (State law) and all ordinances (local laws), and the preparation of an annual report for the Council and residents.

The Council has legislative and policy-making power. It elects a Council President annually to preside in the Mayor’s absence. The Mayor appoints Council members to serve as liaisons to the Recreation Committee, Finance Committee, Athletic Association, Public Works, Special Events, School Board, Public Safety and Senior Citizens. The Mayor and one council member are members of the Planning and Zoning Board.

As of 2013, the Mayor of Berlin Township is Democrat Phyllis A. Magazzu, whose term of office ends December 31, 2013. Members of the Township Council are Council President Christopher T. Morris (D, 2013), Marion Bodanza (D, 2013), Frank Epifanio (D, 2015) and Jerome McIntosh (D, 2015).[33][34][35][36][37][38]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Berlin Township is located in the 1st Congressional District[39] and is part of New Jersey's 6th state legislative district.[8][40][41]

New Jersey's First Congressional District is represented by Rob Andrews (D, Haddon Heights).[42] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[43][44] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[45][46]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 6th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by James Beach (D, Voorhees Township) and in the General Assembly by Louis Greenwald (D, Voorhees Township) and Pamela Rosen Lampitt (D, Cherry Hill).[47] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[48] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[49]

Camden County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders, its seven members elected at-large to three-year terms office on a staggered basis, with two or three seats coming up for election each year.[50] As of 2013, Camden County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Louis Cappelli, Jr. (Collingswood, term ends December 31, 2014)[51], Freeholder Deputy Director Edward McDonnell (Pennsauken Township, 2013)[52], Michelle Gentek (Gloucester Township, 2015)[53], Ian K. Leonard (Camden, 2015)[54], Scot N. McCray (Camden, 2014)[55], Jeffrey L. Nash (Cherry Hill, 2015)[56] and Carmen Rodriguez (Merchantville, 2013).[57][58][59] Constitutional officers elected countywide are County Clerk Joseph Ripa,[60] Sheriff Charles H. Billingham[61] and Surrogate Patricia Egan Jones.[62]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 3,449 registered voters in Berlin Township, of which 1,552 (45.0% vs. 31.7% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 370 (10.7% vs. 21.1%) were registered as Republicans and 1,524 (44.2% vs. 47.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 3 voters registered to other parties.[63] Among the township's 2010 Census population, 64.4% (vs. 57.1% in Camden County) were registered to vote, including 82.9% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 73.7% countywide).[63][64]

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 1,502 votes here (63.9% vs. 54.8% countywide), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 814 votes (34.6% vs. 43.5%) and other candidates with 19 votes (0.8% vs. 0.9%), among the 2,351 ballots cast by the township's 3,686 registered voters, for a turnout of 63.8% (vs. 70.4% in Camden County).[65][66] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 1,519 votes here (62.4% vs. 66.2% countywide), ahead of Republican John McCain with 829 votes (34.1% vs. 30.7%) and other candidates with 32 votes (1.3% vs. 1.1%), among the 2,434 ballots cast by the township's 3,478 registered voters, for a turnout of 70.0% (vs. 71.4% in Camden County).[67] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 1,305 votes here (56.6% vs. 61.7% countywide), ahead of Republican George W. Bush with 876 votes (38.0% vs. 36.4%) and other candidates with 23 votes (1.0% vs. 0.8%), among the 2,304 ballots cast by the township's 3,123 registered voters, for a turnout of 73.8% (vs. 71.3% in the whole county).[68]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 857 ballots cast (51.0% vs. 53.8% countywide), ahead of Republican Chris Christie with 650 votes (38.7% vs. 38.5%), Independent Chris Daggett with 73 votes (4.3% vs. 4.5%) and other candidates with 29 votes (1.7% vs. 1.1%), among the 1,681 ballots cast by the township's 3,428 registered voters, yielding a 49.0% turnout (vs. 40.8% in the county).[69]

Education[edit]

The Berlin Township Public Schools serve students in prekindergarten through eighth grade. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[70]) are John F. Kennedy Elementary School[71] for PreK through 3rd grade (272 students) and Dwight D. Eisenhower Middle School[72] for grades 4-8 (330).[73][74] The Huster Building, formerly used as a kindergarten and now used for administration, is named after Robert R. Huster, a Berlin Township resident who was killed in action on April 8, 1967, during the Vietnam War.[75]

Public school students from Berlin Township and Clementon attend Overbrook High School in Pine Hill for grades 9-12 as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Pine Hill Schools.[76] A representative from Berlin Township serves on the board of education of the Pine Hill Schools.[77]

Students from Berlin Township, and from all of Camden County, are eligible to attend the Camden County Technical Schools, a countywide public school district that serves the vocational and technical education needs of students at the high school and post-secondary level at Gloucester Township Technical High School in the Sicklerville section of Gloucester Township or Pennsauken Technical High School in Pennsauken Township. Students are accepted based on district admission standards and costs of attendance and transportation are covered by the home district of each student.[78]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

The township had a total of 36.12 miles (58.13 km) of roadways, of which 27.40 miles (44.10 km) are maintained by the municipality, 6.51 miles (10.48 km) by Camden County and 2.21 miles (3.56 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[79]

County Route 534 and County Route 561 both pass through the township. Route 73 also passes through Berlin Township.

Public transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit bus service is available in the borough on the 406 route, which operates between Berlin Township and Philadelphia.[80][81]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Berlin Township include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ Township Clerk's Office, Berlin Township. Accessed October 4, 2012.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 33.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Berlin, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 4, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Berlin township, Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 4, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 3. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Berlin township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed October 4, 2012.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 11, 2012.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Berlin, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed October 4, 2012.
  13. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 21, 2013.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Berlin, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 7, 2013.
  15. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  16. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 4, 2012.
  17. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  18. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed October 4, 2012.
  19. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 103. Accessed October 4, 2012.
  20. ^ Hutchinson, Viola L. The Origin of New Jersey Place Names, New Jersey State Library, May 1945. Accessed December 30, 2013.
  21. ^ New Jersey Local Names, State of New Jersey. Accessed December 30, 2013.
  22. ^ The Pinelands National Reserve, New Jersey Pinelands Commission. Accessed December 30, 2013.
  23. ^ Pinelands Municipalities, New Jersey Pinelands Commission, April 2003. Accessed December 30, 2013.
  24. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Camden County Municipalities, 1850 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed October 4, 2012.
  25. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed October 7, 2013.
  26. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 335. Accessed October 4, 2012.
  27. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States: 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 715. Accessed October 4, 2012.
  28. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network. Accessed December 26, 2013.
  29. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Berlin township, Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 4, 2012.
  30. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Berlin township, Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 4, 2012.
  31. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Berlin township, Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 4, 2012.
  32. ^ "The Faulkner Act: New Jersey's Optional Municipal Charter Law", New Jersey State League of Municipalities, July 2007. Accessed October 7, 2013.
  33. ^ Mayor and Council, Berlin Township. Accessed December 30, 2013.
  34. ^ 2013 Municipal Data Sheet, Berlin Township. Accessed December 30, 2013.
  35. ^ Camden County Official Election Results 2012 General Election November 6, 2012 - Amended December 3, 2012, Camden County, New Jersey Clerk. Accessed August 21, 2013.
  36. ^ Camden County Official Election Results 2011 General Election November 8, 2011, Camden County, New Jersey Clerk. Accessed August 21, 2013.
  37. ^ Camden County General Election November 3, 2009, Camden County, New Jersey Clerk. Accessed August 21, 2013.
  38. ^ Staff. "Camden County election results 2012", South Jersey Times, November 7, 2012. Accessed August 21, 2013.
  39. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  40. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 55, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  41. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  42. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  43. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  44. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013. "Former Newark Mayor Cory Booker was sworn in as a Democratic senator from New Jersey today, taking the oath of office, exchanging hugs with Vice President Joe Biden and acknowledging the applause of friends and family members seated in the visitor's gallery that rings the chamber.... Booker, 44, was elected to fill out the term of the late Sen. Frank Lautenberg, who died earlier this year."
  45. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  46. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  47. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 21, 2014.
  48. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  49. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  50. ^ What is a Freeholder?, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  51. ^ Louis Cappelli, Jr., Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  52. ^ Edward McDonnell, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  53. ^ Freeholder Michelle Gentek, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  54. ^ Ian K. Leonard, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  55. ^ Scot N. McCray, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  56. ^ Jeffrey L. Nash, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  57. ^ Carmen Rodriguez, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  58. ^ Board of Freeholders, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  59. ^ State of the County and Reorganization Meeting, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013. "Freeholder-Director Louis Cappelli, Jr. delivered the State of the County address as the Freeholder Board officially reorganized on Jan. 4 at 4:00 p.m. at the Camden County Courthouse. Newly elected Freeholder Michelle Gentek took the oath of office along with Ian Leonard and Jeffrey L. Nash to join their colleagues on the 2013 Freeholder Board."
  60. ^ County Clerk, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  61. ^ Sheriff, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  62. ^ Surrogate's Court, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  63. ^ a b Voter Registration Summary - Camden, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed December 30, 2013.
  64. ^ GCT-P7: Selected Age Groups: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision; 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 30, 2013.
  65. ^ Presidential November 6, 2012 General Election Results - Camden County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 15, 2013. Accessed December 30, 2013.
  66. ^ Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast November 6, 2012 General Election Results - Camden County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 15, 2013. Accessed December 30, 2013.
  67. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Camden County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed December 30, 2013.
  68. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Camden County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed December 30, 2013.
  69. ^ 2009 Governor: Camden County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed December 30, 2013.
  70. ^ Data for the Berlin Township Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed October 4, 2012.
  71. ^ John F. Kennedy Elementary School, Berlin Township Public Schools. Accessed August 21, 2013.
  72. ^ Dwight D. Eisenhower Middle School, Berlin Township Public Schools. Accessed August 21, 2013.
  73. ^ Schools, Berlin Township Public Schools. Accessed August 21, 2013.
  74. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Berlin Township Public Schools, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed August 21, 2013.
  75. ^ Robert R. Huster, New Jersey Vietnam Veterans Memorial. Accessed December 30, 2013. "Robert R. Huster was born on May 27, 1946, to Mr. and Mrs. Roy Huster. His home of record is West Berlin, NJ."
  76. ^ Interdistrict Choice Program, Pine Hill Schools. Accessed December 30, 2013. "Pine Hill School District is composed of four schools which include Dr. Albert Bean Elementary School, John Glenn Elementary School, Pine Hill Middle School, and Overbrook High School. Students from both Clementon and Berlin Township School Districts join those residing in Pine Hill to attend Overbrook High School."
  77. ^ Board of Education, Pine Hill Schools. Accessed December 30, 2013.
  78. ^ About Our Schools, Camden County Technical Schools. Accessed December 30, 2013.
  79. ^ Camden County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed December 30, 2013.
  80. ^ Camden County Bus / Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of January 28, 2010. Accessed December 30, 2013.
  81. ^ South Jersey Transit Guide, Cross County Connection, as of April 1, 2010. Accessed December 30, 2013.
  82. ^ Damien Covington, Database Football. Accessed February 9, 2009.
  83. ^ O'Reilly, David. "An Olympian from Berlin Township helps bring field hockey to the masses", The Philadelphia Inquirer, December 23, 2012. Accessed December 30, 2013. "Dawson, 27, who lives in Berlin Township and played for Eastern High School in Voorhees before competing at the Beijing and London Olympics, was there to light a fire."
  84. ^ Stenzler, Jon. "A Big Body, A Bigger Heart. Ron Dayne; Teddy Bear", The Philadelphia Inquirer, December 13, 1999. Accessed December 30, 2013. "Dayne, who grew up in Berlin Township and carried the football for Overbrook Regional Senior High School in Pine Hill and for the University of Wisconsin, is known for a bruising running style."

External links[edit]