Bernardo de Muro

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Bernardo De Muro (November 3, 1881 – 27 October 1955) was an international operatic tenor from Sardinia.

Biography[edit]

Bernardino de Muro was born on November 3, 1881, in Tempio Pausania, Sardinia, to Antonio Maria and Jeanne-Marie Demuro. His father was a small landowner. Bernardo’s formal education ceased at primary school. Initially self-taught, he began singing in a café in Tempio. Moving to Rome, he participated in a competition for admission to the Conservatory of St. Cecilia in 1903. He studied under A. Sbriscia and A. Marconi. His operatic debut was on May 12, 1910, at the Teatro Costanzi in Rome, performing in Cavalleria rusticana by Mascagni. He received flattering reviews for this performance. In the next few years he performed in Madama Butterfly, L'Africaine, Carmen, and further performances of Cavalleria rusticana. Although he was long a star at La Scala,[1] he was largely unknown to American audiences until he began to tour there. His continued career carried him to such places as the Solis in Montevideo, Uruguay in 1916,[2] the Dal Verme in Milan (performing Mefistofele),[3] the Hippodrome,[1] St. Petersburg, Florida, in 1927,[4] and The Dell Ofrecie Grand Opera Company of New York (performing Aida).[5]

Later years[edit]

By 1935 De Muro was forced to cancel performances due to ill health.[5] He became a successful businessman with a large cork factory in Milan.[1] He died in 1955. Recognized as Tempio’s most famous son, his body was brought back to the place of his birth, and he was buried under a pyramid of his own design.[6]

Singing style[edit]

His singing was reported to be resonant and clear with a robust tone, but pinched in the head-notes.[7]

Partial discography[edit]

  • Aida
    • Pur ti riveggo (His Master’s Voice DA171; Victor 949)[8] – recorded May 22, 1922
  • Andrea Chénier
    • Si fui soldato (His Master’s Voice DB 553; Victor 6387) [8][9] – recorded March 1, 1912
    • Un di all'azzurro spazio "Improvviso" (His Master’s Voice DB 553; Victor 74376; Victor 6380) [8][10] – recorded March 1, 1912
  • Carmen
    • Ho nome Escamillo (with Roberto Janni) (His Master’s Voice DB 554; Victor 6385) [8][9] – recorded March 30, 1914
    • Il fior che avevi a me tu dato (His Master’s Voice DB 549) [8] – recorded March 13, 1912
    • Il fior che avevi a me tu dato (His Master’s Voice 2-052173; Victor 6385) [8][9] – recorded May 19, 1917
  • La fanciulla del West
    • Ch'ella mi creda libero (His Master’s Voice DA171; Victor 949)[8][11] – recorded May 17, 1920
    • Sono Ramerrez (His Master’s Voice DB 372; Victor 6422) [8][9] – recorded November 4, 1921
  • Isabeau
    • Dormivi? Sognavo (with Valentina Bartolomasi) (His Master’s Voice DB 556; Victor 6387) [8] – recorded March 8, 1912
    • E passerà la viva creatura (Victor 6379) [8][9] – recorded March 7, 1912
    • Fu vile l'editto (His Master’s Voice DB 558; Victor 6387) [8][9] – recorded March 7, 1912
    • I tuoi occhi (with Valentina Bartolomasi) (His Master’s Voice DB 556) [8] – recorded March 8, 1912
    • Tu ch'odio lo mio grido (La canzone del falco) (His Master’s Voice DB 557; Victor 6379) [8][9] – recorded March 7, 1912
  • Otello
    • Dio! mi potevi scagliar (Victor 6386) [8][9] – recorded March 30, 1914
    • Esultate! L'orgoglie musulmano sepulto (His Master’s Voice DB 559) [12]
    • Niun mi tema (La morte di Otello) (His Master’s Voice DB 560; Victor 6386) [8][9] – recorded March 30, 1914
    • Ora e per pempre addio sante memorie (His Master’s Voice DB 559) [12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c The Day (New London, Conn.), "New York Day by Day", July 30, 1934. Page 24.
  2. ^ Salgado, Susana (2003). The Teatro Solís: 150 years of opera, concert, and ballet in Montevideo. Wesleyan University Press. ISBN 978-0-8195-6594-5.
  3. ^ The Musical Times, volume 62 (1921)
  4. ^ The Evening Independent (St. Petersburg, Florida), [1] Nov 22, 1927. Page 7.
  5. ^ a b The Afro-American , "Opera Postponed in Philadelphia" June 1, 1935. Page 16.
  6. ^ Facaros, Dana and Pauls, Michael. (2004). Cadogan Guide: Sardinia. Cadogan Guides, London. ISBN 1-86011-324-9.
  7. ^ Klein, Hermann and Moran, William R. (1990). Herman Klein and the Gramophone . Hal Leonard Corporation. ISBN 0-931340-18-7.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p Bolig, John R. (2004). The Victor Red Seal Discography Vol. 1: Single-Sided Series (1903–1925). Mainspring Press, Denver. ISBN 0-9671819-8-4.
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Settlemier, Tyrone. "The Online Discographical Project – Victor 6000 series (12-inch Double-Sided Red Seal) Numerical Listing". Retrieved August 9, 2010
  10. ^ Settlemier, Tyrone. "The Online Discographical Project – Victor 74000 series Numerical Listing". Retrieved August 9, 2010
  11. ^ Settlemier, Tyrone. "The Online Discographical Project – Victor 500 series (10-inch Double-Sided Red Seal) Numerical Listing". Retrieved August 9, 2010
  12. ^ a b Nauck, Kurt. Catalogue: Vintage Record Auction Number 39.