Bernardsville, New Jersey

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Bernardsville, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Bernardsville
Cows grazing at a farm in Bernardsville
Cows grazing at a farm in Bernardsville
Map of Bernardsville in Somerset County. Inset: Location of Somerset County in New Jersey.
Map of Bernardsville in Somerset County. Inset: Location of Somerset County in New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Bernardsville, New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Bernardsville, New Jersey.
Coordinates: 40°43′49″N 74°35′33″W / 40.730387°N 74.592571°W / 40.730387; -74.592571Coordinates: 40°43′49″N 74°35′33″W / 40.730387°N 74.592571°W / 40.730387; -74.592571[1][2]
Country  United States of America
State  New Jersey
County Somerset
Incorporated April 29, 1924
Government[6]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Lee C. Honecker (term ends December 31, 2013)[3]
 • Administrator Ralph A. Maresca, Jr.[4]
 • Clerk Sandra G. Jones[5]
Area[2]
 • Total 12.980 sq mi (33.619 km2)
 • Land 12.905 sq mi (33.425 km2)
 • Water 0.075 sq mi (0.194 km2)  0.58%
Area rank 184th of 566 in state
9th of 21 in county[2]
Elevation[7] 682 ft (208 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 7,707
 • Estimate (2013)[11] 7,767
 • Rank 296th of 566 in state
13th of 21 in county[12]
 • Density 597.2/sq mi (230.6/km2)
 • Density rank 428th of 566 in state
17th of 21 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07924[13][14]
Area code(s) 908[15]
FIPS code 3403505590[16][2][17]
GNIS feature ID 0885159[18][2]
Website www.bernardsvilleboro.org

Bernardsville /ˈbɜrnərdzvɪl/ is a borough in Somerset County, New Jersey, United States. In 2000 Bernardsville had the 10th-highest per capita income in the state[19] and ranked 76th nationally among the 100 highest-income places in the United States (with at least 1,000 households).[citation needed] As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 7,707,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 362 (+4.9%) from the 7,345 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 748 (+11.3%) from the 6,597 counted in the 1990 Census.[20]

Bernardsville was incorporated as a borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 6, 1924, from portions of Bernards Township, based on the results of a referendum held on April 29, 1924.[21]

Part of the borough was listed on the National Register of Historic Places as Olcott Avenue Historic District in 2009.[22]

History[edit]

Bernardsville was originally a section of Bernards Township known as Vealtown.[23] In 1840, Vealtown became Bernardsville, named after Sir Francis Bernard, Colonial governor of New Jersey from 1758 to 1760.[24] Located in the northernmost part of Somerset County, just 12 miles (19 km) south of Morristown, the borough includes some of the last vestiges of the Great Eastern Forest.[25]

During the Revolutionary War, General Charles Lee rested his troops in Vealtown around the night of December 12 to 13, 1776. General Lee and some of his guard spent the night about 3 miles (5 km) southeast at White's Inn on the southeast side of Basking Ridge, near the manor house of Continental Army general William Alexander, Lord Stirling. On the morning of December 13, General Lee was captured by the British and removed to New York.[26]

After the Civil War, many wealthy and prominent New Yorkers moved into the area, first as summer visitors, then as permanent residents of the Bernardsville Mountain.

The Gladstone Branch railroad line was built through Bernardsville in 1872 and played an important role in the borough's development. Bernardsville did not become an independent municipality until 1924, when it split from Bernards Township.[21]

Olcott Avenue Historic District, above Olcott Center The New Jersey State Review Board for Historic Sites recommended the creation of the Olcott Avenue historic district on February 10, 2009. While the Olcott Avenue School is but one historic structure within Bernardsville's first historic district area, the area's appeal and historic significance is part of the story of the rise of the middle class in Bernardsville and how this particular location impacted the entire region, from the downtown, Little Italy, and the Mountain Colony areas.[27]

Geography[edit]

Bernardsville is located at 40°43′49″N 74°35′33″W / 40.730387°N 74.592571°W / 40.730387; -74.592571 (40.730387,-74.592571). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 12.980 square miles (33.619 km2), of which, 12.905 square miles (33.425 km2) of it was land and 0.075 square miles (0.194 km2) of it (0.58%) was water.[1][2]

Climate[edit]

Bernardsville has a Humid continental climate with cold, snowy winters and warm to hot, humid summers on average.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1930 3,336
1940 3,405 2.1%
1950 3,956 16.2%
1960 5,515 39.4%
1970 6,652 20.6%
1980 6,715 0.9%
1990 6,597 −1.8%
2000 7,345 11.3%
2010 7,707 4.9%
Est. 2013 7,767 [11][29] 0.8%
Population sources:1930[30]
1930-1990[31] 2000[32][33] 2010[8][9][10]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 7,707 people, 2,685 households, and 2,086 families residing in the borough. The population density was 597.2 per square mile (230.6 /km2). There were 2,871 housing units at an average density of 222.5 per square mile (85.9 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 91.38% (7,043) White, 0.88% (68) Black or African American, 0.14% (11) Native American, 3.27% (252) Asian, 0.06% (5) Pacific Islander, 2.18% (168) from other races, and 2.08% (160) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 11.72% (903) of the population.[8]

There were 2,685 households, of which 40.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 67.2% were married couples living together, 7.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.3% were non-families. 19.1% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.87 and the average family size was 3.27.[8]

In the borough, 28.6% of the population were under the age of 18, 5.5% from 18 to 24, 22.7% from 25 to 44, 31.0% from 45 to 64, and 12.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.1 years. For every 100 females there were 98.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.3 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $128,333 (with a margin of error of +/- $12,233) and the median family income was $141,510 (+/- $17,179). Males had a median income of $87,500 (+/- $36,816) versus $73,250 (+/- $10,725) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $70,141 (+/- $9,890). About 1.9% of families and 2.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.2% of those under age 18 and 5.2% of those age 65 or over.[34]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 7,345 people, 2,723 households, and 2,050 families residing in the borough. The population density was 568.1 people per square mile (219.3/km2). There were 2,807 housing units at an average density of 217.1 per square mile (83.8/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 93.94% White, 0.25% African American, 0.15% Native American, 2.64% Asian, 1.55% from other races, and 1.47% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.98% of the population.[32][33]

There were 2,723 households out of which 35.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 67.2% were married couples living together, 6.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.7% were non-families. 21.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.69 and the average family size was 3.12.[32][33]

In the borough the population was spread out with 26.1% under the age of 18, 4.5% from 18 to 24, 28.7% from 25 to 44, 28.0% from 45 to 64, and 12.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 96.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.3 males.[32][33]

The median income for a household in the borough was $104,162, and the median income for a family was $126,601. Males had a median income of $91,842 versus $50,732 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $69,854. About 1.6% of families and 2.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.3% of those under age 18 and 2.5% of those age 65 or over.[32][33]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

A train at the Bernardsville Station

Bernardsville is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[6] The Borough form of government used by Maywood, the most common system used in the state, is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.[35]

As of 2014, the Mayor of Bernardsville is Republican Lee C. Honecker, whose term of office ends December 31, 2014.[36] Members of the Borough Council are Council President Joseph C. Rossi (R, 2014), Jeffrey J. DeLeo (R, 2015), Michael dePoortere (R, 2015), John F. Farrell (R, 2014), Chris Schmidt (R, 2016) and Janet Waite (R, 2016).[37][38][39][40][41]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Bernardsville is located in the 7th Congressional District[42] and is part of New Jersey's 25th state legislative district.[9][43][44] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Bernardsville had been in the 16th state legislative district.[45]

New Jersey's Seventh Congressional District is represented by Leonard Lance (R, Clinton Township).[46] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[47][48] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[49][50]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 25th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Anthony Bucco (R, Boonton Town) and in the General Assembly by Tony Bucco (R, Boonton Township) and Michael Patrick Carroll (R, Morris Township).[51][52] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[53] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[54]

Somerset County is governed by a five-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, whose members are elected at-large to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with one or two seats coming up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects a Director and Deputy Director from among its members.[55] As of 2014, Somerset County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Patrick Scaglione (R, Bridgewater Township, 2015),[56] Freeholder Deputy Director Mark Caliguire (R, Skillman in Montgomery Township, 2015),[57] Peter S. Palmer (R, Bernardsville, term ends December 31, 2014),[58] Patricia L. Walsh (R, Green Brook Township, 2016)[59] and Robert Zaborowski (R, Somerset in Franklin Township, 2014),[60][61] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Brett A. Radi (R, Somerville, 2017),[62] Sheriff Frank J. Provenzano (R, Raritan, 2016)[63][64] and Surrogate Frank Bruno (R, Branchburg, 2015).[65]

Politics[edit]

An elegant restaurant in Bernardsville

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 5,341 registered voters in Bernardsville, of which 955 (17.9% vs. 26.0% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 2,472 (46.3% vs. 25.7%) were registered as Republicans and 1,913 (35.8% vs. 48.2%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There was one voter registered to another party.[66] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 69.3% (vs. 60.4% in Somerset County) were registered to vote, including 97.1% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 80.4% countywide).[66][67]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 2,295 votes here (55.8% vs. 46.1% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 1,753 votes (42.6% vs. 52.1%) and other candidates with 41 votes (1.0% vs. 1.1%), among the 4,113 ballots cast by the borough's 5,208 registered voters, for a turnout of 79.0% (vs. 78.7% in Somerset County).[68] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 2,495 votes here (61.0% vs. 51.5% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 1,543 votes (37.7% vs. 47.2%) and other candidates with 37 votes (0.9% vs. 0.9%), among the 4,093 ballots cast by the borough's 4,909 registered voters, for a turnout of 83.4% (vs. 81.7% in the whole county).[69]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 1,867 votes here (60.2% vs. 55.8% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 747 votes (24.1% vs. 34.1%), Independent Chris Daggett with 463 votes (14.9% vs. 8.7%) and other candidates with 13 votes (0.4% vs. 0.7%), among the 3,099 ballots cast by the borough's 5,304 registered voters, yielding a 58.4% turnout (vs. 52.5% in the county).[70]

Education[edit]

Public school students in pre-Kindergarten through twelfth grade attend the schools of the Somerset Hills Regional School District, a regional school district serving students from Bernardsville, Far Hills and Peapack-Gladstone, along with students from Bedminster who are sent to the district's high school as part of a sending/receiving relationship.[71] As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's three schools had an enrollment of 2,028 students and 155.4 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 13.05:1.[72] The three schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[73]) are Bedwell Elementary School[74] (PreK–4, 689 students), Bernardsville Middle School[75] (5–8, 570) and Bernards High School[76] (9–12, 769), all of which are located in Bernardsville.[77]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Bernardsville include:

Pronunciation[edit]

Bernardsville is often mispronounced as "BernARDSville" as opposed to the correct parochial pronunciation "BERNardsville".[96]

References[edit]

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  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ Administration, Borough of Bernardsville. Accessed November 26, 2012.
  5. ^ Borough Clerk, Borough of Bernardsville. Accessed November 26, 2012.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 77.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Bernardsville, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 4, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Bernardsville borough, Somerset County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 25, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 11. Accessed January 6, 2013.
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  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Bernardsville, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed November 26, 2012.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 26, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Bernardsville, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed September 28, 2014.
  16. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
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  22. ^ Olcott Avenue Historic District, National Park Service. Accessed February 11, 2013.
  23. ^ DePalma, Anthony. "IF YOU'RE THINKING OF LIVING IN BERNARDSVILLE", The New York Times, December 23, 1984. Accessed January 25, 2012. "BERNARDSVILLE, all history and charm, is a community kissed by good fortune. Already an established hamlet inexplicably known as Vealtown by the time Washington and his army tramped through on their way to their Jockey Hollow encampment near Morristown, it has managed by dint of its resolve and a good bit of luck to survive booms and busts over the last 200 years and still retain its unique character."
  24. ^ Staff. "A look at Bernards through the centuries", Courier-News, August 27, 2003. Accessed January 25, 2012. "1760 King George II of England creates Bernardston Township by charter in honor of Sir Francis Bernard, provincial governor of New Jersey, 1758-60. At that time, the township also includes Far Hills, Warren and Bernardsville, then known as Vealtown."
  25. ^ History, Bernardsville Borough. Accessed January 25, 2012.
  26. ^ Lossing, Benson John. The pictorial field-book of the revolution; or, illustrations, by pen and pencil, of the history, biography, scenery, relics, and traditions of the war for independence, Volume 2, p. 222. Harper & Bros., 1852. Accessed January 25, 2012.
  27. ^ Zavalick, Charles; and Baratta, Amy. "Monsignor John Torney dies at 102; services Thursday and Friday", The Bernradsville News, May 14, 2013. Accessed August 26, 2013. "'It was a very unusual parish, with Little Italy on one side and on the other side the Mountain colony,' Msgr. Torney said in a 2012 interview with this newspaper."
  28. ^ "Monthly Averages for Bernardsville, NJ". The Weather Channel. Retrieved December 17, 2013. 
  29. ^ Census Estimates for New Jersey April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 23, 2014.
  30. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 718. Accessed January 25, 2012.
  31. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network. Accessed January 25, 2012.
  32. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Bernardsville borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 26, 2012.
  33. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Bernardsville borough, Somerset County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 26, 2012.
  34. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Bernardsville borough, Somerset County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 25, 2012.
  35. ^ Cerra, Michael F. "Forms of Government: Everything You've Always Wanted to Know, But Were Afraid to Ask", New Jersey State League of Municipalities. Accessed September 27, 2014.
  36. ^ Mayor Lee C. Honecker, Borough of Bernardsville. Accessed February 11, 2013. "Term: 1/1/2011 - 12/31/2014"
  37. ^ Elected Officials, Bernardsville Borough. Accessed January 25, 2012.
  38. ^ WINNERS LIST; Somerset County - General Election November 6, 2012, Somerset County, New Jersey County Clerk's Office. Accessed February 11, 2013.
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  41. ^ Staff. " Waite, Schmidt take close victory in Bernardsville", The Bernardsville News, November 5, 2013. Accessed September 28, 2014. "Republican Janet Waite and Chris Schmidt captured two seats on the Borough Council Tuesday, defeating Democrat Robert Frawley and incumbent Craig Lawrence, running as an independent."
  42. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
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  47. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  48. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  49. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
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  52. ^ District 25 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 11, 2014.
  53. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  54. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
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  56. ^ Patrick Scaglione, Somerset County, New Jersey. Accessed August 5, 2014. A term-end year of 2012 is listed as of date accessed.
  57. ^ Mark Caliguire, Somerset County, New Jersey. Accessed August 5, 2014.
  58. ^ Peter S. Palmer, Somerset County, New Jersey. Accessed August 5, 2014.
  59. ^ Patricia Walsh, Somerset County, New Jersey. Accessed August 5, 2014.
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  65. ^ Somerset County Surrogate, Somerset County, New Jersey. Accessed August 5, 2014.
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  67. ^ GCT-P7: Selected Age Groups: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision; 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 10, 2013.
  68. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Somerset County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed February 10, 2013.
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  70. ^ 2009 Governor: Somerset County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed February 10, 2013.
  71. ^ Somerset County School Districts-Sending/Receiving/Regional, Somerset County Superintendent of Schools. Accessed July 31, 2013.
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  73. ^ Data for the Somerset Hills School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed September 28, 2014.
  74. ^ Bedwell Elementary School, Somerset Hills Regional School District. Accessed July 31, 2013.
  75. ^ Bernardsville Middle School, Somerset Hills Regional School District. Accessed July 31, 2013.
  76. ^ Bernards High School, Somerset Hills Regional School District. Accessed July 31, 2013.
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  78. ^ Miller, Judith. "Old Money, New Needs", The New York Times, November 17, 1991. Accessed January 25, 2012. "Eventually Kuser fell in love with another woman and left his wife. She moved from Bernardsville, N.J., to New York and took up a career writing features and book reviews, and eventually became an editor at House & Garden."
  79. ^ Gardner, Amanda. "THEATER; Tony Awards' New Jersey Ties", The New York Times, July 23, 2008. Accessed August 26, 2013. "Mr. Chamberlin met Roger Bart (hailing from Bernardsville and nominated in the category of best performance by a featured actor in a musical for The Producers) early in his freshman year at the Mason Gross School of the Arts at Rutgers University."
  80. ^ Staff. "Philip Charles Capice; 78, Bernardsville native, noted television producer", The Bernardsville News, January 4, 2010. Accessed June 22, 2013. "Philip Charles Capice, 78, a native of Bernardsville and a notable television producer, died peacefully on Wednesday, Dec. 30, 2009, at his home in Los Angeles, Calif."
  81. ^ Staff. "FORREST F. DRYDEN, FINANCIER, IS DEAD; Former Head of the Prudential Insurance Company, Which Was Founded by His Father. ACTIVE IN JERSEY UTILITIES Also Served on Board of Newark Public Library - Was Long Active in National Guard.", The New York Times, July 20, 1932. Accessed March 21, 2011. ""BERNARDSVILLE, N. J., July 19 - Forrest Fairchild Dryden, president of the Prudential Insurance Company of America, of Newark, N. J., from 1912 to 1922, and a figure in the investigation of insurance and banking conditions in New York by the Lockwood committee in 1921, died today of heart disease at his home here in his sixty-eighth year."
  82. ^ Staff. "JOHN F. DRYDEN DIES WORTH $50,000,000; Ex-Senator from New Jersey Succumbs to Pneumonia, Following an Operation.", The New York Times, November 25, 1911. Accessed March 21, 2011. "At the time of his death Mr. Dryden had about completed the building of his property at High Point, N. J., which is the largest private estate in New Jersey and said to be one of the largest of its kind in the United States. This is apart from his large estate at Bernardsville, N. J."
  83. ^ "Dr. Ernest Duncan, 74, Mathematics Professor", The New York Times, November 28, 1990. Accessed January 25, 2012. "Dr. Ernest R. Duncan, professor emeritus of mathematics at Rutgers University and the author of several mathematics textbooks, died on Sunday at Morristown Memorial Hospital in New Jersey. He was 74 years old and lived in Bernardsville, N.J. He died of leukemia, his family said."
  84. ^ Rockland, Kate. "BY THE WAY; A Monument to Sagging", The New York Times, June 12, 2006. Accessed March 21, 2011. "Mr. Ecko, a Rutgers dropout who was born and raised in Lakewood, recently bought a scandal-tainted villa in Bernardsville that completes the New Jersey spin to his Cinderella story."
  85. ^ Lambert, Bruce. "Millicent Fenwick, 82, Dies; Gave Character to Congress", The New York Times, September 17, 1992. Accessed January 25, 2012. "Millicent H. Fenwick, a retired Republican Congresswoman renowned for her political independence and championing of liberal causes, died yesterday at her home in Bernardsville, N.J. She was 82 years old. She died of heart failure, her family said."
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