Bernie Bierman

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To be distinguished from Bernard Bierman.
Bernie Bierman
Bernie Bierman.jpg
Sport(s) Football, basketball
Biographical details
Born (1894-03-11)March 11, 1894
Springfield, Minnesota
Died March 7, 1977(1977-03-07) (aged 82)
Laguna Hills, California
Playing career
1913–1915 Minnesota
Position(s) Halfback
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1919–1921
1923–1924
1925–1926
1927–1931
1932–1941
1942
1945–1950

Basketball
1919–1922
1925–1927
1928–1930

Montana
Tulane (assistant)
Mississippi State
Tulane
Minnesota
Iowa Pre-Flight
Minnesota


Montana
Mississippi State
Tulane
Head coaching record
Overall 153–65–12 (football)
89–51 (basketball)
Bowls 0–1
Statistics
College Football Data Warehouse
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
5 National (1934–1936, 1940–1941)
3 Southern (1929–1931)
7 Big Ten (1933–1935, 1937–1938, 1940–1941)
Awards
Amos Alonzo Stagg Award (1958)
College Football Hall of Fame
Inducted in 1955 (profile)

Bernard W. "Bernie" Bierman (March 11, 1894 – March 7, 1977) was an American football player and coach of football and basketball. He coached from 1919 to 1950 except for a span during World War II when he served in the U.S. armed forces. Bierman was the head coach at the University of Montana (1919–1921), Mississippi State University (1925–1926), Tulane University (1927–1931), and his alma mater, the University of Minnesota (1932–1941, 1945–1950), compiling a career college football record of 153–65–12. At Minnesota, Bierman's Golden Gophers compiled a 93–35–6 record, won five national championships and seven Big Ten Conference titles, and completed five undefeated seasons. Bierman was also the head basketball coach at Montana (1919–1922), Mississippi State (1925–1927), and Tulane (1928–1930), tallying a career college basketball mark of 89–51.

Personal life[edit]

Bierman was married to Clara McKenzie Bierman. They had two sons, William A. Bierman, a lawyer in St. Paul, Minnesota, and James Bierman, of Los Angeles, California. Bierman was a brother of the Alpha Delta Phi Fraternity.

Head coaching record[edit]

Football[edit]

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs AP#
Montana Grizzlies (Independent) (1919–1921)
1919 Montana 2–3–2
1920 Montana 4–3
1921 Montana 3–3–1
Montana: 9–9–3
Mississippi State Bulldogs (Southern Conference) (1925–1926)
1925 Mississippi State 3–4–1 1–4 T–15th
1926 Mississippi State 5–4 2–3 14th
Mississippi State: 8–8–1 3–7
Tulane Green Wave (Southern Conference) (1927–1931)
1927 Tulane 2–5–1 2–5–1 18th
1928 Tulane 6–3–1 3–3–1 T–10th
1929 Tulane 9–0 6–0 1st
1930 Tulane 8–1 5–0 T–1st
1931 Tulane 11–1 8–0 T–1st L Rose
Tulane: 36–10–2 24–8–2
Minnesota Golden Gophers (Big Ten Conference) (1932–1941)
1932 Minnesota 5–3 2–3 6th
1933 Minnesota 4–0–4 2–0–4 T–1st
1934 Minnesota 8–0 5–0 T–1st
1935 Minnesota 8–0 5–0 T–1st
1936 Minnesota 7–1 4–1 T–2nd 1
1937 Minnesota 6–2 5–0 1st 5
1938 Minnesota 6–2 4–1 1st 10
1939 Minnesota 3–4–1 2–3–1 7th
1940 Minnesota 8–0 6–0 1st 1
1941 Minnesota 8–0 5–0 1st 1
Iowa Pre-Flight Seahawks (Independent) (1942)
1942 Iowa Pre-Flight 7–3
Iowa Pre-Flight: 7–3
Minnesota Golden Gophers (Big Ten Conference) (1945–1950)
1945 Minnesota 4–5 1–5 T–8th
1946 Minnesota 5–4 3–4 5th
1947 Minnesota 6–3 3–3 T–3rd
1948 Minnesota 7–2 5–2 3rd 16
1949 Minnesota 7–2 4–2 3rd 8
1950 Minnesota 1–7–1 1–4–1 7th
Minnesota: 93–35–6 57–28–6
Total: 153–65–12
      National championship         Conference title         Conference division title
#Rankings from final AP Poll.

References[edit]

External links[edit]