Bernie Moore

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Bernie Moore
Bernie Moore.jpg
Sport(s) Football, basketball, track & field
Biographical details
Born (1895-04-30)April 30, 1895
Jonesborough, Tennessee
Died November 6, 1967(1967-11-06) (aged 72)
Winchester, Tennessee
Playing career
Football
1910s

Carson–Newman
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1926–1928
1929–1934
1935–1947

Basketball
1926–1928

Track & field
1930–1947

Mercer
LSU (assistant)
LSU


Mercer


LSU
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
1948–1966 SEC (commissioner)
Head coaching record
Overall 95–51–9 (football)
24–11 (basketball)
Bowls 1–3–1
Statistics
College Football Data Warehouse
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
Football
2 SEC (1935–1936)
Awards
Amos Alonzo Stagg Award (1966)
Corbett Award (1967)
College Football Hall of Fame
Inducted in 1952 (profile)

Bernie H. Moore (April 30, 1895 – November 6, 1967) was an American college football, basketball, track and field coach and college athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at Mercer University (1926–1928) and Louisiana State University (1935–1947). Moore was also the head basketball coach at Mercer (1926–1928) and the head track and field coach at LSU (1930–1947). He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1952.

Moore was the son of a Baptist minister and graduated from Carson–Newman College in Jefferson City, Tennessee.

In addition to two Southeastern Conference (SEC) championships in football won at LSU, his track and field teams won twelve SEC titles and the national championship in 1933. LSU's Bernie Moore Track Stadium is named in his honor.

After ending his tenure at LSU, the longest of any coach at the university to that point, Moore became SEC Commissioner in 1948. In 1967, he won the inaugural James J. Corbett Memorial Award given by the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics. He was inducted into the Tennessee Sports Hall of Fame in 1966. His last residence was the Henderson Clark-Moore House in Winchester, Tennessee.

Head coaching record[edit]

Football[edit]

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs AP#
Mercer Bears (Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association) (1926–1928)
1926 Mercer 4–3–2
1927 Mercer 5–4
1928 Mercer 3–5–1
Mercer: 12–12–3
LSU Tigers (Southeastern Conference) (1935–1947)
1935 LSU 9–2 5–0 1st L Sugar
1936 LSU 9–1–1 6–0 1st L Sugar 2
1937 LSU 9–2 5–1 2nd L Sugar 8
1938 LSU 6–4 2–4 10th
1939 LSU 4–5 1–5 10th
1940 LSU 6–4 3–3 6th
1941 LSU 4–4–2 2–2–2 7th
1942 LSU 7–3 3–2 6th
1943 LSU 6–3 2–2 2nd W Orange
1944 LSU 2–5–1 2–3–1 6th
1945 LSU 7–2 5–2 3rd 15
1946 LSU 9–1–1 5–1 3rd T Cotton 8
1947 LSU 5–3–1 2–3–1 8th
LSU: 83–39–6 43–28–4
Total: 95–51–9
      National championship         Conference title         Conference division title
#Rankings from final AP Poll.

References[edit]

External links[edit]