Dwarf deities

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Berronar Truesilver)
Jump to: navigation, search

In many campaign settings for the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game, the Morndinsamman, the dwarven pantheon of gods, consists of the leader, Moradin, as well as Abbathor, Berronar Truesilver, Clanggedin Silverbeard, Dugmaren Brightmantle, Dumathoin, Muamman Duathal, and Vergadain. Other dwarven gods (such as Hanseath, Mya, Roknar, Tharmekhûl, Thautam, and Valkauna from the Races of Stone supplement) may be present in different campaign settings.

Publication history[edit]

Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 1st edition (1977-1988)[edit]

Moradin was created by James M. Ward for the Deities and Demigods Cyclopedia (1980).[1] Vergadain, Dumathoin, Abbathor, Berronar, and Clanggedin Silverbeard appeared in Roger E. Moore's Dragon article, "The Gods of the Dwarves",[2] and appeared again in the original Unearthed Arcana (1985).[3]

Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 2nd edition (1989-1999)[edit]

The dwarven pantheon of the Forgotten Realms appeared in Dwarves Deep (1990), consisting of Moradin, Clanggedin Silverbeard, Sharindlar, Vergadain, Dumathoin, Abbathor, Berronar Truesilver, Marthammor Duin, Gorm Gulthyn, Haela Brightaxe, and Thard Harr.[4]

The dwarven pantheon was detailed in the book Monster Mythology (1992), including details about their priesthoods. This version of the pantheon consisted of Moradin, Berronar Truesilver, Clanggedin Silverbeard, Dugmaren Brightmantle, Dumathoin, Muamman Duathal, Vergadain, Abbathor, and the dwarf hero Gnarldan Steelshield.[5] The role of these dwarvish powers in the cosmology of the Planescape campaign setting was described in On Hallowed Ground (1996).[6]

The members of the dwarven pantheon received very detailed descriptions for their roles in the Forgotten Realms in Demihuman Deities (1998), including Abbathor, Berronar Truesilver, Clanggedin Silverbeard, Deep Duerra, Dugmaren Brightmantle, Dumathoin, Gorm Gulthyn, Haela Brightaxe, Laduguer, Marthammor Duin, Moradin, Sharindlar, Thard Harr, and Vergadain.[7]

Dungeons & Dragons 3rd edition (2000-2007)[edit]

Moradin appears as one of the deities described in the third edition Players Handbook (2000),[8] and is detailed in Deities and Demigods (2002).[9]

The dwarven pantheon's role in the Forgotten Realms is revisited in Faiths and Pantheons (2002), which describes Abbathor, Berronar Truesilver, Clanggedin Silverbeard, Deep Duerra, Dugmaren Brightmantle, Dumathoin, Gorm Gulthyn, Haela Brightaxe, Laduguer, Marthammor Duin, Moradin, Sharindlar, Thard Harr, and Vergadain.[10]

Moradin appears again in the 3.5 revised Players Handbook (2003).[11] His priesthood is detailed for this edition in Complete Divine (2004).[12] The dwarven deities Moradin, Hanseath, Laduguer, Mya, Roknar, Thammekhûl, and Valkauna appeared in Races of Stone (2004).[13]

Dungeons & Dragons 4th edition (2008-)[edit]

Moradin appears as one of the deities described in the Players Handbook for this edition (2008).[14]

Abbathor[edit]

Abbathor
Game background
Title(s) Great Master of Greed, Trove Lord, the Avaricious, Wyrm of Avarice
Home plane Gray Waste of Hades
Power level Intermediate
Alignment Neutral Evil
Portfolio Greed
Domains Evil, Luck, Trickery (also Dwarf and Trade in Forgotten Realms)
Superior Moradin
Design details

Abbathor (AB-ba-thor[15]) is the dwarven deity of greed. His holy symbol is a jeweled dagger. Abbathor manifests as a very large dwarf, fat and piggy-eyed. He wears leather and furs made from those non-dwarves who have opposed him in the past. He is the only evil power in the dwarven pantheon of Morndinsamman, but is tolerated and supports the other deities in conflicts. Designated of being of intermediate power and with neutral evil alignment, his home plane is the Gray Waste of Hades.

Abbathor was first detailed in Roger E. Moore's article "The Dwarven Point of View," in Dragon #58 (TSR, 1982).[16] In Dragon #92 (December 1984), Gary Gygax indicated this as one of the deities legal for the Greyhawk setting.[17] He also appeared in the original Unearthed Arcana (1985).[18]

Abbathor was first detailed as part of the dwarven pantheon in the Forgotten Realms in Dwarves Deep (1990).[4] He was detailed in the book Monster Mythology (1992), including details about his priesthood.[19] His role in the cosmology of the Planescape campaign setting was described in On Hallowed Ground (1996).[20] He received a very detailed description for his role in the Forgotten Realms in Demihuman Deities (1998).[7] Abbathor's role in the Forgotten Realms is revisited in Faiths and Pantheons (2002).[10] His priesthood is detailed for 3rd edition in Complete Divine (2004).[21] A story details that a long-abandoned temple to Abbathor in the Yatils was looted by Arnon Orberend.[22]:75

Berronar Truesilver[edit]

Berronar Truesilver
Game background
Title(s) The Revered Mother; the Mother Goddess; Matron of Home and Hearth; Mother of Safety, Truth, and Home
Home plane Seven Mounting Heavens of Celestia
Power level Intermediate
Alignment Lawful Good
Portfolio Safety, truth, home, healing
Domains Good, Healing, Law, Protection (also Dwarf and Family in Forgotten Realms)
Superior Moradin
Design details

Berronar Truesilver is the dwarf deity of safety, truth, home, and healing. She shares a realm with Moradin, Erackinor, on the plane of Mount Celestia. She acts as Moradin's consort. She is an intermediate deity that is of the Lawful Good alignment. Berronar appears as a powerful female dwarf with a beard braided into four rows, wearing chain mail and a silver helm.

Berronar Truesilver was first detailed in Roger E. Moore's article "The Dwarven Point of View," in Dragon #58 (TSR, 1982) in which she was just called Berronar.[16] In Dragon #92 (December 1984), Gary Gygax indicated this as one of the deities legal for the Greyhawk setting.[17] She also appeared in the original Unearthed Arcana (1985).[18]

Berronar Truesilver was first detailed as part of the dwarven pantheon in the Forgotten Realms in Dwarves Deep (1990).[4] She was detailed in the book Monster Mythology (1992), including details about her priesthood.[19] Her role in the cosmology of the Planescape campaign setting was described in On Hallowed Ground (1996).[20] She received a very detailed description for his role in the Forgotten Realms in Demihuman Deities (1998).[7] She is described as one of the good deities that celestials can serve in the supplement Warriors of Heaven (1999).[23] Berronar Truesilver's role in the Forgotten Realms is revisited in Faiths and Pantheons (2002).[10] Her priesthood is detailed for 3rd edition in Complete Divine (2004).[21]

Clanggedin Silverbeard[edit]

Clanggedin Silverbeard
Game background
Title(s) The Father of Battle, Lord of the Twin Axes, the Giantkiller, the Goblinbane, the Wyrmslayer, the Rock of Battle
Home plane Peaceable Kingdoms of Arcadia
Power level Intermediate
Alignment Lawful Good
Portfolio Battle
Domains Good, Law, Strength, War (also Dwarf in Forgotten Realms)
Superior Moradin
Design details

Clanggedin Silverbeard is the dwarf deity of battle. Clanggedin's realm is named Mount Clanggedin after himself, located on the plane of Arcadia. Clangeddin appears as a craggy, middle-aged, bald, silver-bearded dwarf in chain mail. He is usually armed with paired battle axes, and appears powerful and always smiling. He an intermediate deity of the Lawful Good alignment with the domains of Good, Law, Strength, War and Dwarf.

Clanggedin Silverbeard was first detailed in Roger E. Moore's article "The Dwarven Point of View," in Dragon #58 (TSR, 1982).[16] In Dragon #92 (December 1984), Gary Gygax indicated this as one of the deities legal for the Greyhawk setting.[17] He also appeared in the original Unearthed Arcana (1985).[18]

Clanggedin Silverbeard was first detailed as part of the dwarven pantheon in the Forgotten Realms in Dwarves Deep (1990).[4] He was detailed in the book Monster Mythology (1992), including details about his priesthood.[19] His role in the cosmology of the Planescape campaign setting was described in On Hallowed Ground (1996).[20] He received a very detailed description for his role in the Forgotten Realms in Demihuman Deities (1998).[7] He is described as one of the good deities that celestials can serve in the supplement Warriors of Heaven (1999).[24] Clanggedin Silverbeard's role in the Forgotten Realms is revisited in Faiths and Pantheons (2002).[10] His priesthood is detailed for 3rd edition in Complete Divine (2004).[21]

Deep Duerra[edit]

Deep Duerra is the Goddess of duergar, psionics, conquest, expansion and is listed as a dead power.

Dugmaren Brightmantle[edit]

Dugmaren Brightmantle
Game background
Title(s) The Gleam in the Eye, the Wandering Tinker, the Errant Explorer
Home plane Concordant Domain of the Outlands
Power level Lesser
Alignment Chaotic Good (NG tendencies)
Portfolio Scholarship, discovery, invention
Domains Chaos, Good, Knowledge (also Craft, Dwarf, and Rune in Forgotten Realms)
Superior Moradin
Design details

Dugmaren Brightmantle is the dwarf deity of scholarship, discovery, and invention. Dugmaren shares the Dwarven Mountain on the Outlands with Dumathoin and Vergadain. Dugmaren appears as an elderly dwarf with sparkling blue eyes. He is slightly hunched over and he wears the bright blue cloak that is his namesake. He irritates his father by wandering away from his projects before he completes them or before he finds a use for the knowledge he has collected. He is of the Chaotic Good alignment, his domains are Chaos, Good, Knowledge and is worshiped by dwarves and some gnomes who are scholars, inventors, engineers, or tinkers.

Dugmaren Brightmantle was first detailed in the book Monster Mythology (1992), including details about his priesthood.[19] His role in the cosmology of the Planescape campaign setting was described in On Hallowed Ground (1996).[20] He received a very detailed description for his role in the Forgotten Realms in Demihuman Deities (1998).[7] Dugmaren Brightmantle's role in the Forgotten Realms is revisited in Faiths and Pantheons (2002).[10]

Dumathoin[edit]

Dumathoin
Game background
Title(s) Keeper of Secrets under the Mountain, the Silent Keeper, the Mountain Shield
Home plane Concordant Domain of the Outlands
Power level Intermediate
Alignment Neutral (LN tendencies)
Portfolio Mining, mountain dwarves, underground exploration
Domains Earth, Knowledge, Protection (also Cavern, Craft, Dwarf, and Metal in Forgotten Realms)
Superior Moradin
Design details

Dumathoin (DOO-muh-THOE-in) is the patron of mountain dwarves, and the dwarf deity of mining and underground exploration. He is also the protector of the dwarven dead. His holy symbol is a cut, faceted gem inside of a mountain. He is an intermediate deity of Neutral alignment with the domains of Earth, Knowledge, Protection and also Cavern, Craft, Dwarf, and Metal in Forgotten Realms.

Dumathoin is described as a gigantic male dwarf with a barrel chest. His hair and beard are sculpted gray stone, and his skin is earth-brown in color. His eyes are silvery flame. He carries a two-handed mattock made from solidified magma. Dumathoin never speaks and instead communicates with gestures and the occasional grunt or sigh. Dumathoin is a rival of his brother Abbathor and shares the Dwarven Mountain on the Outlands with Dugmaren and Vergadain.

Dumathoin was first detailed in Roger E. Moore's article "The Dwarven Point of View," in Dragon #58 (TSR, 1982).[16] In Dragon #92 (December 1984), Gary Gygax indicated this as one of the deities legal for the Greyhawk setting.[17] He also appeared in the original Unearthed Arcana (1985).[18] Dumathoin was first detailed as part of the dwarven pantheon in the Forgotten Realms in Dwarves Deep (1990).[4] He was detailed in the book Monster Mythology (1992), including details about his priesthood.[19] His role in the cosmology of the Planescape campaign setting was described in On Hallowed Ground (1996).[20] He received a very detailed description for his role in the Forgotten Realms in Demihuman Deities (1998).[7] Dumathoin's role in the Forgotten Realms is revisited in Faiths and Pantheons (2002).[10] His priesthood is detailed for 3rd edition in Complete Divine (2004).[21]

Gorm Gulthyn[edit]

Gorm Gulthyn (L): God of guardian of all dwarves, defense, watchfulness; is now a dead power.

Haela Brightaxe[edit]

Haela Brightaxe (D): Goddess of luck in battle, joy of battle, dwarven fighters; is now a dead power.

Hanseath[edit]

Hanseath is the dwarven deity of war, carousing, and alcohol. He is a lesser deity of Chaotic Neutral alignment and his domains are Chaos, Strength, Travel, War.

Known as the Bearded One for the thick hair that obscures most of his face, Hanseath represents the festive side of dwarven culture. Brewers hold him in high regard, as do dwarf barbarians and any dwarf who charges headlong into battle heedless of the odds.

Laduguer[edit]

Laduguer
Game background
Title(s) The Exile, the Gray Protector, Master of Crate, the Slave Driver, the Taskmaster, the Harsh
Home plane Infernal Battlefield of Acheron
Power level Intermediate
Alignment Lawful Evil (LN tendencies)
Portfolio Crafts, magic, protection
Domains Evil, Law, Magic, Protection (also Craft, Dwarf, and Metal in Forgotten Realms)
Superior formerly Moradin, currently none
Design details

Laduguer (/ˈlɑː.dʌ.ɡwɜr/ LAAH-duh-gwur)[7][10] is the evil deity of the duergar, the Underdark-dwelling cousins of dwarves. He is an intermediate deity of the Lawful Evil alignment with the domains of Evil, Law, Magic, Protection and also Craft, Dwarf, and Metal in Forgotten Realms settings. Laduguer appears as a tall, gaunt duergar with skin that can change between gray and brown to match the nearby rock. He is bald and perpetually frowning. He was in the Morndinsamman, but he exiled himself over a point of honor. His realm, Hammergrim, is located on the plane of Acheron

Laduguer was first detailed in the book Monster Mythology (1992), including details about his priesthood.[19] His role in the cosmology of the Planescape campaign setting was described in On Hallowed Ground (1996).[20] He received a very detailed description for his role in the Forgotten Realms in Demihuman Deities (1998).[7] Laduguer was described in Defenders of the Faith (2000).[25] Laduguer's role in the Forgotten Realms is revisited in Faiths and Pantheons (2002).[10]

Marthammor Duin[edit]

Marthammor Duin
Game background
Title(s) Finder-of-Trails, Watcher over Wanderers, the Watchful Eye
Home plane Dwarfhome
Power level Lesser
Alignment Neutral Good
Portfolio Guides, explorers, expatriates, travelers, lightning
Domains Good, Protection, Travel, Dwarf
Superior Moradin
Design details

Marthammor Duin (Mar-tham-more doo-ihn), is the dwarven deity of Travel and Protection in the Forgotten Realms campaign setting. He is also known as the Finder of Trails, the Watcher over Wanderers, the Watchful Eye, and the Wanderer. He is the patron of dwarves who have left the clanholds to explore the world. His holy symbol is an upright mace in front of a fur-trimmed leather boot.

Marthammor Duin first appears in the 2nd edition book Dwarves Deep (1990) by Ed Greenwood, as one of the deities of the Forgotten Realms version of the dwarven pantheon.[26] Marthammor Duin is further detailed in Demihuman Deities (1998).[27] Marthammor Duin appears in 3rd edition in Faiths and Pantheons (2002).[10] Marthammor Duin appears in 4th edition in the Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide (2008). In this edition, he is an exarch of Moradin.[28]

Moradin[edit]

Moradin
Game background
Title(s) Soul Forger, Dwarffather, the All-Father, the Creator
Home plane Dwarfhome (Forgotten Realms)/Celestia, the Radiant Throne (4th edition)
Power level Greater
Alignment Lawful Good
Portfolio Dwarves, creation, smithing, protection, metalcraft, stonework
Domains Creation, Earth, Good, Law, and Protection
Superior None
Design details

Moradin is the chief deity in the dwarven pantheon in the Dungeons & Dragons game and is a member of the default D&D pantheon. Moradin's domains are Creation, Earth, Good, Law, and Protection.[29] He is the creator deity of the first dwarves out of earthen materials in the Dungeons & Dragons lore. Moradin is the head of the dwarven pantheon. He is married to Berronar Truesilver and lives with her in Erackinor, on the plane of Mount Celestia.

Moradin was created by James M. Ward for the Deities and Demigods Cyclopedia (1980).[1] Moradin was first detailed as part of the dwarven pantheon in the Forgotten Realms in Dwarves Deep (1990).[30] Monster Mythology (1992) included details about his priesthood.[5] His role in the cosmology of the Planescape campaign setting was described in On Hallowed Ground (1996).[6] Moradin received a very detailed description for his role in the Forgotten Realms in Demihuman Deities (1998).[7] Moradin is described as one of the good deities that celestials can serve in the supplement Warriors of Heaven (1999).[24]

In Dungeons & Dragons 3.0, Moradin appears as one of the deities described in the Players Handbook for this edition (2000).[8] Moradin is also detailed in Deities and Demigods (2002),[9] and his role in the Forgotten Realms is revisited in Faiths and Pantheons (2002).[10] Moradin appears in the revised Players Handbook for 3.5.[11] His priesthood is detailed for this edition in Complete Divine (2004).[12] Moradin is also included in the 4.0 edition handbook.[14] A setting-specific version of him appears in the Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide and the Forgotten Realms Player's Guide (both 2008) for this edition.

Muamman Duathal[edit]

Muamman Duathal (Moo-AM-man Doo-AH-thuhl) is the dwarf deity of wanderers and expatriates. He is also the dwarven god of lightning, which he uses as an omen. His symbol is an upright mace over a single leather boot trimmed with fur, or a mace clutched by a pair of gauntleted fists. He is a lesser deity of the Neutral Good alignment and has the domains of Good, Protection, Travel[31] Muamman appears as a weathered, nondescript dwarf dressed in plain clothes, usually green. He is thin, with a beard of deep black. He wields Glowhammer, a mace that glows as if were still cooling from being forged. Often, he carries a weathered staff. Muamman's realm is the Cavern of Rest in the ever-shifting subterranean layer of Nidavellir on the plane of Ysgard.

Muamman Duathal was first detailed in the book Monster Mythology (1992), including details about his priesthood.[19] His role in the cosmology of the Planescape campaign setting was described in On Hallowed Ground (1996).[20] He received a very detailed description for his role in the Forgotten Realms in Demihuman Deities (1998).[7] Muamman Duathal's role in the Forgotten Realms is revisited in Faiths and Pantheons (2002).[10] In the Forgotten Realms, Muamman is revered only as an aspect of the god Marthammor Duin.[7]

Mya[edit]

Mya is a greater goddess of clan, family and wisdom.[13]:18

Roknar[edit]

Roknar is a lesser god of greed, intrigue, lies and earth.[13]:19

Sharindlar[edit]

Sharindlar (I): Goddess of healing, mercy, romantic love, fertility, dancing, courtship, the moon

Thard Harr[edit]

Thard Harr (L): God of wild dwarves, jungle survival, hunting

Tharmekhûl[edit]

Tharmekhûl is a god of the forge, fire and warfare.[13]:19

Thautam[edit]

Thautam is an intermediate god of magic and darkness.[13]:20

Ulaa[edit]

Ulaa
Game background
Title(s) The Stonewife
Home plane Mount Celestia and the Outlands
Power level Intermediate
Alignment Lawful Good
Portfolio Hills, Mountains, Gemstones
Domains Earth, Good, Law
Superior none
Design details

In the World of Greyhawk campaign setting, Ulaa is the goddess of Hills, Mountains, and Gemstones. Her holy symbol is a mountain with a ruby heart; she places rubies in the earth as gifts to miners, who do her husband's work. Ulaa is depicted as a dwarven woman with gnomish facial features. She wields a mighty hammer called Skullringer. Ulaa's realm in the Outlands is called the Iron Hills. She also spends time in the Seven Heavens. Her husband, Bleredd, is said to dwell with the gnomish gods in Bytopia.

Ulaa was first detailed for the Dungeons & Dragons game in the World of Greyhawk Fantasy Game Setting (1983), by Gary Gygax.[32] Ulaa was subsequently detailed in Greyhawk Adventures (1988).[33] Ulaa was one of the deities described in the From the Ashes set (1992), for the Greyhawk campaign.[34] Ulaa's role in the 3rd edition Greyhawk setting was defined in the Living Greyhawk Gazetteer (2000).[35]

Valkauna[edit]

Valkauna is an intermediate goddess of oaths, death and birth.[13]:21

Vergadain[edit]

Vergadain
Game background
Title(s) God of Wealth and Luck, the Merchant King, the Trickster, the Laughing Dwarf, the Short Father
Home plane Concordant Domain of the Outlands
Power level Intermediate
Alignment Neutral (CN tendencies)
Portfolio Wealth, luck
Domains Luck, Trickery (also Dwarf and Trade in Forgotten Realms)
Superior Moradin
Design details

Vergadain (VUR-guh-dain) is the dwarf deity of Wealth and Luck. He is an intermediate deity of the Neutral alignment; his domains are Luck, Trickery and also Dwarf and Trade in Forgotten Realms. Vergadain appears as a tall dwarf dressed in the brown and yellow garb of a merchant; often his clothes are tattered and dusty from his long travels. Underneath this, he wears armor and often carries musical instruments (Vergadain has a great singing voice and is said to be a great poet), disguises, and sacks of treasure protected with poisonous snakes and vermin. His boots contain concealed weapons such as knives or garrotes, or hidden places or both. He shares the Dwarven Mountain on the Outlands with Dugmaren and Dumathoin.

Vergadain was first detailed in Roger E. Moore's article "The Dwarven Point of View," in Dragon #58 (TSR, 1982).[16] In Dragon #92 (December 1984), Gary Gygax indicated this as one of the deities legal for the Greyhawk setting.[17] He also appeared in the original Unearthed Arcana (1985).[18]

Vergadain was first detailed as part of the dwarven pantheon in the Forgotten Realms in Dwarves Deep (1990).[4] He was detailed in the book Monster Mythology (1992), including details about his priesthood.[19] His role in the cosmology of the Planescape campaign setting was described in On Hallowed Ground (1996).[20] He received a very detailed description for his role in the Forgotten Realms in Demihuman Deities (1998).[7] Vergadain is described as one of the good deities that celestials can serve in the supplement Warriors of Heaven (1999).[24] Vergadain role in the Forgotten Realms is revisited in Faiths and Pantheons (2002).[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Ward, James and Robert Kuntz. Deities and Demigods (TSR, 1980)
  2. ^ Moore, Roger "The Gods of the Dwarves." Dragon #58 (TSR, 1982)
  3. ^ Gygax, Gary. Unearthed Arcana (TSR, 1985)
  4. ^ a b c d e f Greenwood, Ed. Dwarves Deep (TSR, 1990)
  5. ^ a b Sargent, Carl. Monster Mythology (TSR, 1992)
  6. ^ a b McComb, Colin. On Hallowed Ground (TSR, 1996)
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Boyd, Eric L. Demihuman Deities (TSR, 1998)
  8. ^ a b Tweet, Jonathan, Cook, Monte, Williams, Skip. Player's Handbook (Wizards of the Coast, 2000)
  9. ^ a b Redman, Rich, Skip Williams, and James Wyatt. Deities and Demigods (Wizards of the Coast, 2002)
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Boyd, Eric L, and Erik Mona. Faiths and Pantheons (Wizards of the Coast, 2002).
  11. ^ a b Tweet, Jonathan, Cook, Monte, Williams, Skip. Player's Handbook (Wizards of the Coast, 2003)
  12. ^ a b Noonan, David. Complete Divine (Wizards of the Coast, 2004)
  13. ^ a b c d e f Noonan, David, Jesse Decker, and Michelle Lyons. Races of Stone (Wizards of the Coast, 2004)
  14. ^ a b Heinsoo, Rob, Andy Collins, and James Wyatt. Player's Handbook. (Wizards of the Coast, 2008)
  15. ^ Mentzer, Frank. "Ay pronunseeAY shun gyd" Dragon #93 (TSR, 1985)
  16. ^ a b c d e Moore, Roger E. "The Dwarven Point of View." Dragon #58 (TSR, 1982)
  17. ^ a b c d e Gygax, Gary (December 1984). "From the Sorcerer's Scroll: Clerics live by other rules". Dragon (Lake Geneva WI: TSR) (92): 22. ]
  18. ^ a b c d e Gygax, Gary. Unearthed Arcana (TSR, 1985)
  19. ^ a b c d e f g h Sargent, Carl. Monster Mythology (TSR, 1992)
  20. ^ a b c d e f g h McComb, Colin. On Hallowed Ground (TSR, 1996)
  21. ^ a b c d Noonan, David. Complete Divine (Wizards of the Coast, 2004)
  22. ^ Sargent, Carl. The Marklands. Lake Geneva, WI: TSR, 1993
  23. ^ Perkins, Christopher. Warriors of Heaven (TSR, 1999)
  24. ^ a b c Perkins, Christopher. Warriors of Heaven (TSR, 1999)
  25. ^ Redman, Rich, and James Wyatt. Defenders of the Faith (Wizards of the Coast, 2000)
  26. ^ Greenwood, Ed. Dwarves Deep (TSR, 1990)
  27. ^ Boyd, Eric L. Demihuman Deities (TSR, 1998)
  28. ^ Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. Wizards of the Coast. p. 81. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3. 
  29. ^ According to the D&D 3rd Edition book Deities and Demigods and the 3.5 Player's Handbook, his domains are only Earth, Good, Law, and Protection.
  30. ^ Greenwood, Ed. Dwarves Deep (TSR, 1990)
  31. ^ Living Greyhawk: Volume 1, Number 3. Spring, 591 CY. February, 2001
  32. ^ Gygax, Gary. World of Greyhawk Fantasy Game Setting (TSR, 1983)
  33. ^ Ward, James M. Greyhawk Adventures (TSR, 1988)
  34. ^ Sargent, Carl. From the Ashes (TSR, 1992)
  35. ^ Holian, Gary, Erik Mona, Sean K Reynolds, and Frederick Weining. Living Greyhawk Gazetteer (Wizards of the Coast, 2000)
  • Olsen, John. "Worth its weight in gold." Dragon #109. Lake Geneva, WI: TSR, 1986.
  • Oppen, Eric. "The Folk of the Underworld." Dragon #131. Lake Geneva, WI: TSR, 1988.
  • "Servants of the Jeweled Dagger." Dragon #152. Lake Geneva, WI: TSR, 1989.
  • Conforti, Steven, ed. Living Greyhawk Official Listing of Deities for Use in the Campaign, version 2.0. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2005. Available online:[1]
  • Living Greyhawk: Volume 1, Number 3. Spring, 591 CY. February 2001.
  • [2]