Best Male College Athlete ESPY Award

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The Best Male College Athlete ESPY Award has been presented annually since 2002 to the male sportsperson, irrespective of university represented or sport contested, adjudged to be the best in a given calendar year of those contesting collegiate sport in the United States through the National Collegiate Athletic Association. The award serves also to replace the Best College Football Player and Best Male College Basketball Player ESPY Awards, each of which was presented annually between 1993 and 2001, inclusive.

Between 2002 and 2004, the award voting panel comprised variously fans; sportswriters and broadcasters, sports executives, and retired sportspersons, termed collectively experts; and ESPN personalities, but balloting thereafter has been exclusively by fans over the Internet from amongst choices selected by the ESPN Select Nominating Committee. The ESPY Awards ceremony is conducted in June and awards conferred reflect performance and achievement over the twelve months previous to presentation.[1]

List of winners[edit]

Year Winner University represented Sport played
2002 Cael Sanderson Iowa State Cyclones Wrestling
2003 Carmelo Anthony Syracuse Orangemen Basketball
2004 Emeka Okafor Connecticut Huskies Basketball
2005 Matt Leinart USC Trojans American football
2006 Reggie Bush USC Trojans American football
2007 Kevin Durant Texas Longhorns Basketball
2008 Tim Tebow Florida Gators American football
2009 Tim Tebow Florida Gators American football
2010 John Wall Kentucky Wildcats Basketball
2011 Jimmer Fredette BYU Cougars Basketball
2012 Robert Griffin III Baylor Bears American football
2013 Johnny Manziel Texas A&M Aggies American football
2014 Doug McDermott Creighton Bluejays Basketball

See also[edit]

Sport-specific player of the year awards[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Because of the rescheduling of the ESPY Awards ceremony, the award presented in 2002 was given in consideration of performance betwixt February 2001 and June 2002.

References[edit]