Grammy Award for Best Spoken Word Album for Children

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Grammy Award for Best Spoken Word Album for Children
A gold gramophone trophy with a plaque set on a table
Gilded gramophone trophy presented to Grammy Award winners
Awarded for quality "spoken word" performances aimed at children
Country United States
Presented by National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences
First awarded 1994
Last awarded 2011
Official website grammy.com

The Grammy Award for Best Spoken Word Album for Children was an honor presented at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards,[1] to recording artists for works containing quality "spoken word" performances aimed at children. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position".[2]

The award was first presented to Audrey Hepburn and producers Deborah Raffin and Michael Viner in 1994 for the album Audrey Hepburn's Enchanted Tales. Its last winners were the artists, producers, audio engineers, and audio mixers who contributed to the album Julie Andrews' Collection of Poems, Songs, and Lullabies in 2011, when it was announced the award would be combined with the Grammy Award for Best Musical Album for Children to form the Grammy Award for Best Children's Album.[3]

Tom Chapin and producers Arnold Cardillo and David Rapkin, and audio engineer-musical director Rory Young hold the record for the most wins in this category, with a total of three. Artists Bill Harley and Jim Dale, along with audio engineer David Correia, are the other musicians to win the award more than once, all winning it twice. Former U.S. President Bill Clinton has also won the award, along with Mikhail Gorbachev and Sophia Loren, for their work on the album Wolf Tracks and Peter and the Wolf at the 2003 installment of the awards.

Recipients[edit]

An African-American male playing a trumpet. He is wearing glasses and a light blue suit.
2000 winner Wynton Marsalis
A Caucasian man wearing a denim jacket with blue eyes and dark blonde hair. Two orange lights are in the background.
2002, 2003, and 2005 award winner Tom Chapin
A presidential photograph of a Caucasian man wearing a suit with a black tie. An American flag and bookshelf are in the background.
2004 award winner Bill Clinton
A Caucasian female with gold earrings, blue eyes, and a necklace in a navy blue outfit. She is standing against a black backdrop.
2011 award winner Julie Andrews
Year[I] Performing artist(s) Personnel Work Nominees Ref.
1994 Hepburn, AudreyAudrey Hepburn Deborah Raffin and Michael Viner, producers Audrey Hepburn's Enchanted Tales
  • John CleeseDid I Ever Tell You How Lucky You Are? (Dr. Seuss) (Sharon Lerner producer)
  • Danny Glover and Dr. JohnBrer Rabbit and Boss Lion (Dr. John, Ken Hoin, and Doris Wilhousky producers)
  • Sesame Street MuppetsThe Muppet Christmas Carol Story Album (Ed Mitchell producer)
  • Various artistsAladdin Sound and Story Theater (Ted Kryczko producer)
[4]
1995 Various artists Robert Guillaume, narrator. Randy Thornton and Ted Kryczko, producers The Lion King Read-Along [5]
1996 Stewart, PatrickPatrick Stewart Dan Broatman and Martin Sauer, producers Prokofiev: Peter and the Wolf [6]
1997 Holt, DavidDavid Holt Steven Heller, David Holt, and Virginia Callaway, producers Stellaluna [7]
1998 Kuralt, CharlesCharles Kuralt John McElroy, producer Winnie-the-Pooh
  • Long John BaldryThe Original Story of Winnie-the-Pooh
  • Gabriel ByrneThe Star-Child and the Nightingale & the Rose
  • Eric IdleThe Quite Remarkable Adventures of the Owl and the Pussycat
[8]
1999 Various artists Dan Musselman and Stefan Rudnicki, producers The Children's Shakespeare
  • Miguel FerrerDisney's The Lion King II: Simba's Pride Read-Along (Randy Thornton producer)
  • June ForayDisney's Mulan Read and Sing Along (Ted Kryczko and Randy Thornton producers)
  • Bill HarleyWeezie and the Moon Pies (Bill Harley producer)
  • Sharon Kennedy – The Patchwork Quilt and Other Stories From Around the World (Bing Broderick, Kennedy and Steve Netsky producers)
  • Sesame Street MuppetsElmo's New Laugh (Ed Mitchell producer)
[9]
2000 Greene, GrahamGraham Greene, Wynton Marsalis, and Kate Winslet David Frost and Steven Epstein, producers Listen to the Storyteller [10]
2001 Dale, JimJim Dale David Rapkin, producer Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire [11]
2002 Chapin, TomTom Chapin Arnold Cardillo, producer. Rory Young, audio engineer Mama Don't Allow [12]
2003 Chapin, TomTom Chapin Arnold Cardillo, producer. Rory Young, audio engineer There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly [13]
2004 Clinton, BillBill Clinton, Mikhail Gorbachev, and Sophia Loren Wilhelm Hellweg, producer. Jean-Marie Geijsen, audio engineer. Prokofiev: Peter and the Wolf/Beintus: Wolf Tracks [14]
2005 Chapin, TomTom Chapin Arnold Cardillo, producer. Rory Young, audio engineer. The Train They Call the City of New Orleans [15]
2006 Various artists Christopher B. Cerf and Marlo Thomas, producers. Nick Cipriano, audio engineer. Marlo Thomas & Friends: Thanks & Giving All Year Long [16]
2007 Harley, BillBill Harley David Correia, audio engineer Blah Blah Blah: Stories About Clams, Swamp Monsters, Pirates and Dogs [17]
2008 Dale, JimJim Dale Orli Moscowitz and David Rapkin, producers. Nikki Banks, Sound Engineer. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows
  • Milbre Burch – Making the Heart Whole Again: Stories for a Wounded World
  • Diane Ferlatte – Wickety Whack – Brer Rabbit Is Back
  • Toni MorrisonWho's Got Game? The Ant Or The Grasshopper? The Lion Or the Mouse? Poppy Or the Snake?
  • Stanley Tucci and Meryl StreepThe One and Only Shrek
[18]
2009 Harley, BillBill Harley Daniel P. Dauterive, producer. Beth Anne Austein, David Correia, and Michael Marsolek, audio engineers. Yes to Running! Bill Harley Live [19]
2010 Howdy, BuckBuck Howdy Buck Howdy, producer. Steve Wetherbee, audio engineer and mixer. Aaaaah! Spooky, Scary Stories & Songs [20]
2011 Andrews, JulieJulie Andrews and Emma Walton Hamilton Michele McGonigle, producer. Cynthia Daniels, John Colucci and Tommy Harron, audio engineers and mixers. Julie Andrews' Collection of Poems, Songs, and Lullabies [21]

^[I] Each year is linked to the article about the Grammy Awards held that year.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

General
Specific
  1. ^ "Grammy Awards at a Glance". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). Retrieved April 24, 2010. 
  2. ^ "Overview". National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Retrieved October 10, 2010. 
  3. ^ "Explanation For Category Restructuring". National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Retrieved September 11, 2011. 
  4. ^ "Hundreds Nominated For Grammys". Deseret News (Deseret News Publishing Company). January 10, 1994. p. 6. Retrieved July 13, 2010. 
  5. ^ "The 37th Grammy Nominations". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). January 6, 1995. p. 4. Retrieved July 13, 2010. 
  6. ^ "The Complete List of Nominees". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). January 5, 1996. p. 4. Retrieved July 13, 2010. 
  7. ^ "The Complete List of Nominees". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). January 8, 1997. p. 4. Retrieved July 13, 2010. 
  8. ^ "1997 Grammy Nominees". Orlando Sentinel (Tribune Company). January 9, 1998. p. 3. Retrieved July 13, 2010. 
  9. ^ "Academy's Complete List of Nominees". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). January 6, 1999. p. 5. Retrieved July 13, 2010. 
  10. ^ "Final Nominations For The 42nd Ammual Grammy Awards". Billboard (Nielsen Business Media, Inc) 112 (3): 72. 2000. Retrieved September 11, 2011. 
  11. ^ Boucher, Geoff (January 4, 2001). "Grammys Cast a Wider Net Than Usual". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). Retrieved September 11, 2011. 
  12. ^ "Complete List Of Grammy Nominees". CBS. January 4, 2002. Archived from the original on October 10, 2003. Retrieved March 19, 2011. 
  13. ^ "Complete list of Grammy nominees; ceremony set for Feb. 23". San Francisco Chronicle. January 8, 2003. p. 5. Archived from the original on September 9, 2012. Retrieved March 19, 2011. 
  14. ^ "Grammy Award Winners". The New York Times (The New York Times Company). 2004. Retrieved March 11, 2011. 
  15. ^ "Grammy Award nominees in top categories". USA Today (Gannett Company). February 7, 2005. Retrieved March 19, 2011. 
  16. ^ "The Complete List of Grammy Nominations". The New York Times (The New York Times Company). December 8, 2005. p. 2. Retrieved March 20, 2011. 
  17. ^ "Complete list of Grammy nominees". San Francisco Chronicle (Hearst Corporation). December 8, 2006. p. 5. Archived from the original on September 9, 2012. Retrieved March 20, 2011. 
  18. ^ "The Complete List of Grammy Nominees". The New York Times (The New York Times Company). December 6, 2007. Retrieved March 20, 2011. 
  19. ^ "The 51st Annual Grammy Awards Nominations". CBS. Archived from the original on February 14, 2009. Retrieved September 10, 2011. 
  20. ^ "Nominees And Winners". National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Retrieved March 20, 2011. 
  21. ^ "53rd Annual Grammy Awards nominees list". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). Retrieved February 20, 2011. 

External links[edit]