Betty Loh Ti

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Betty Loh Ti
Betty Loh Ti.jpg
Chinese name (traditional)
Chinese name (simplified)
Pinyin Lè Dì (Mandarin)
Jyutping Lok6 Dai3 (Cantonese)
Birth name Hsi Chung-yi (奚重儀)
Born (1937-07-24)24 July 1937
Shanghai, China
Died 27 December 1968(1968-12-27) (aged 31)
Hong Kong
Years active 1953–1968
Spouse(s) Peter Chen Ho (1962–1968)

Hsi Chung-yi (24 July 1937 – 27 December 1968), known by her stage name Betty Loh Ti, was a Hong Kong actress originally from Shanghai, China. Often described as a 'Classic Beauty', she was very popular with moviegoers in the 1960s.

Biography[edit]

Born in Shanghai as Hsi Chung-yi (simplified Chinese: 奚重仪; traditional Chinese: 奚重儀; pinyin: Xī Zhòngyí), Betty was raised by her maternal grandmother following her parents' death. With her family, she left Shanghai in 1949 and settled in Hong Kong.

Loh started her acting career in 1952 and played in 44 films until her death in 1968. During this period, she joined three film production companies: Great Wall Film Production Limited (1953–1958), The Shaw Brothers (Hong Kong) Limited (1958–1964), and Motion Picture and General Investments Limited (1964–1968). In her 44 films, she played varied roles which showcased her skill as an actress.

She married the actor Peter Chen Ho in 1962. Her brother Kelly Lei Chen was also an actor with MP&GI. Several sources mention that she committed suicide, although this information is subject to debate.

Major films[edit]

The Enchanting Shadow[edit]

In 1960, The Enchanting Shadow (倩女幽魂) was shown at the 1960 Cannes Film Festival. The film produced by the Shaw's Brother Production is the first Mandarin film in colour to take in a major international film festival. An enthusiastic reception was given by the Cannes audience to the film, and Betty was praised as 'The Most Beautiful Star of the East'.

Dream of the Red Chamber[edit]

In 1962, she played the role of Lin Daiyu in this film, based on the world-renowned piece of literature of the same name written by Cao Xueqin during the Qing Dynasty, the love tragedy of the graceful girl with her cousin Jia Baoyu. Though the play was not well received, fans were touched by her performance.

The Love Eterne[edit]

In 1963, Betty Loh Ti became the Best Actress of Golden Horse Awards in Taiwan for her role in the legendary blockbuster The Love Eterne. This film had broken the box office record in many South East Asia countries, Taipei even became 'the crazy city'.

Filmography[edit]

The films she played for the Great Wall Film Production Limited were as follow:

  • The Peerless Beauty (1953)
  • Tales of the City (1954)
  • Loves of the Youngsters (1955)
  • Diamond Thief (1955)
  • The Apartment for Women (1956)
  • Sunrise (1956)
  • Three Loves (1956)
  • A Widow's Tears (1956)
  • The Song of Harmony (1957)
  • Suspicion (1957)
  • The Chivalrous Songstress (1957)
  • Love Affairs of a Confirmed Bachelor (1959)

The films she played for The Shaw Brothers (Hong Kong) Limited were as follow:

  • The Magic Touch (1958)
  • Love Letter Murder (1959)
  • The Adventures of the Thirteenth Sister (1959)
  • The Deformed (1959)
  • The Malayan Affair (1960)
  • Back Door (1960)
  • Love Thy Neighbour (1960)
  • The Enchanting Shadow (1960)
  • When the Peach Blossoms Bloom (1960)
  • The Rose of Summer (1961)
  • The Pistol (1961)
  • The Bride Napping (1962)
  • Dream of the Red Chamber (1962)
  • Mid-Nightmare (Part One) (1962)
  • Mid-Nightmare (Part Two) (1963)
  • Revenge of a Swordswoman (1963)
  • The Love Eterne (1963)
  • My Lucky Star (1963)
  • The Dancing Millionairess (1964)
  • The Story of Sue San (1964)
  • Sons of the Good Earth (1965)

The films she played for Motion Picture and General Investments Limited (MP&GI)were as follow:

  • A Beggar's Daughter (1965)
  • The Longest Night (1965)
  • The Lucky Purse (1966)
  • Lady in the Moon (1966)
  • A Debt of Blood (1966)
  • The Magic Fan (1967)
  • Darling, Stay at Home (1968)
  • Travels with a Sword (1968)
  • Red Plum Pavilion (1968)

See also[edit]

External links[edit]