Beverly, New Jersey

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Beverly, New Jersey
City
City of Beverly
Beverly highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Beverly highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Beverly, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Beverly, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°03′53″N 74°55′19″W / 40.064811°N 74.921904°W / 40.064811; -74.921904Coordinates: 40°03′53″N 74°55′19″W / 40.064811°N 74.921904°W / 40.064811; -74.921904[1][2]
Country  United States of America
State  New Jersey
County Burlington
Incorporated March 5, 1850
Government[5]
 • Type City
 • Mayor Randy Miller (term ends December 31, 2013)[3]
 • Clerk Donna Snyder[4]
Area[2][6]
 • Total 0.785 sq mi (2.031 km2)
 • Land 0.555 sq mi (1.437 km2)
 • Water 0.230 sq mi (0.594 km2)  29.27%
Area rank 523rd of 566 in state
38th of 40 in county[2]
Elevation[7] 23 ft (7 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 2,577
 • Estimate (2013[11]) 2,565
 • Rank 469th of 566 in state
34th of 40 in county[12]
 • Density 4,645.4/sq mi (1,793.6/km2)
 • Density rank 121st of 566 in state
3rd of 40 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08010[13][14]
Area code(s) 609[15]
FIPS code 3400505740[16][2][17]
GNIS feature ID 0885160[18][2]
Website www.thecityofbeverly.com

Beverly is a city in Burlington County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the city's population was 2,577,[8][9][10] reflecting a decline of 84 (-3.2%) from the 2,661 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 312 (-10.5%) from the 2,973 counted in the 1990 Census.[19]

Beverly was originally incorporated as a borough on March 5, 1850, within Willingboro Township. Beverly was incorporated as a city by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 13, 1857, replacing Beverly borough, based on the results of a referendum held that day.[20] Beverly Township, formed in 1859, co-existed alongside Beverly City and was renamed as Delanco Township in 1926.[20]

Geography[edit]

Beverly is located at 40°03′53″N 74°55′19″W / 40.064811°N 74.921904°W / 40.064811; -74.921904 (40.064811,-74.921904). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city had a total area of 0.785 square miles (2.031 km2), of which, 0.555 square miles (1.437 km2) of it was land and 0.230 square miles (0.594 km2) of it (29.27%) was water.[1][2]

Beverly borders Edgewater Park Township, Delanco Township and the Delaware River.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1860 1,220
1870 1,418 16.2%
1880 1,759 24.0%
1890 1,957 11.3%
1900 1,950 −0.4%
1910 2,140 9.7%
1920 2,562 19.7%
1930 2,864 11.8%
1940 2,691 −6.0%
1950 3,084 14.6%
1960 3,400 10.2%
1970 3,105 −8.7%
1980 2,919 −6.0%
1990 2,973 1.8%
2000 2,661 −10.5%
2010 2,577 −3.2%
Est. 2013 2,565 [11] −0.5%
Population sources: 1860-2000[21]
1860-1920[22] 1860-1870[23] 1870[24]
1890-1910[25] 1910-1930[26]
1930-1990[27] 2000[28][29] 2010[8][9][10]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 2,577 people, 1,002 households, and 671.3 families residing in the city. The population density was 4,645.4 per square mile (1,793.6 /km2). There were 1,086 housing units at an average density of 1,957.7 per square mile (755.9 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 61.66% (1,589) White, 29.88% (770) Black or African American, 0.16% (4) Native American, 0.78% (20) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 2.68% (69) from other races, and 4.85% (125) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 9.16% (236) of the population.[8]

There were 1,002 households, of which 28.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 38.3% were married couples living together, 23.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.0% were non-families. 26.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.57 and the average family size was 3.10.[8]

In the city, 23.1% of the population were under the age of 18, 9.5% from 18 to 24, 25.9% from 25 to 44, 30.2% from 45 to 64, and 11.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38.5 years. For every 100 females there were 90.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.5 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $51,964 (with a margin of error of +/- $3,191) and the median family income was $61,058 (+/- $8,725). Males had a median income of $47,738 (+/- $9,129) versus $40,833 (+/- $13,858) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $30,364 (+/- $4,953). About 14.1% of families and 15.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 31.6% of those under age 18 and 12.5% of those age 65 or over.[30]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 2,661 people, 960 households, and 694 families residing in the city. The population density was 4,608.2 people per square mile (1,771.4/km2). There were 1,042 housing units at an average density of 1,804.5 per square mile (693.7/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 64.67% White, 28.75% African American, 0.11% Native American, 0.90% Asian, 1.43% from other races, and 4.13% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.58% of the population.[28][29]

There were 960 households out of which 33.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.6% were married couples living together, 22.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.7% were non-families. 21.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.77 and the average family size was 3.23.[28][29]

In the city the population was spread out with 28.3% under the age of 18, 8.8% from 18 to 24, 29.8% from 25 to 44, 21.2% from 45 to 64, and 11.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 88.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.3 males.[28][29]

The median income for a household in the city was $45,054, and the median income for a family was $49,519. Males had a median income of $35,954 versus $23,836 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,760. About 8.5% of families and 11.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.9% of those under age 18 and 6.9% of those age 65 or over.[28][29]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

The city is governed under the City form of New Jersey municipal government, and consists of an elected mayor and a five-member elected city council who are chosen at-large on a partisan basis to serve four-year terms of office as part of the November general election, with either two or three seats coming up for election in even years. Responsibilities of the governing body include all executive and legislative functions.[5] The Mayor and members of the City Council serve five year terms of office.

As of 2013, the Mayor of the City of Beverly is Randy Miller, whose term of office ends December 31, 2015. Members of the Beverly Common Council are Council President Robert Bancroft (D, 2017), Lawrence Carlbon (D, 2017), Luis M. Crespo (D, 2013), Robert Lowden, Jr. (D, 2017) and Robert D. Thibault (Republican Party, 2015).[31][32][33][34][35][36][37]

Luis Crespo was appointed by the council in December 2012 to fill the vacant seat of Scott Perkins.[38]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Beverly is located in the 3rd Congressional District[39] and is part of New Jersey's 7th state legislative district.[9][40][41]

New Jersey's 3rd Congressional District is represented by Jon Runyan (R, Mount Laurel Township).[42] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[43][44] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[45][46]

The 7th district of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Diane Allen (R, Edgewater Park Township) and in the General Assembly by Herb Conaway (D, Delanco Township) and Troy Singleton (D, Palmyra).[47] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[48] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[49]

Burlington County is governed by a Board of chosen freeholders, whose five members are elected at-large in partisan elections to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year.[50] The board chooses a director and deputy director from among its members at an annual reorganization meeting held in January.[50] As of 2014, Burlington County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Bruce Garganio (R, 2014; Florence Township),[51] Deputy Director Joseph Howarth (R, 2014; Evesham Township)[52] Aimee Belgard (D, 2015; Edgewater Park Township),[53] Joseph B. Donnelly (R, 2016; Cinnaminson Township)[54] and Joanne Schwartz (D, 2015; Southampton Township).[55][50][56] Gargiano was named in March 2014 to serve the unexpired term of Leah Arter and was chosen to fill her position as Freeholder Director.[57]

Education[edit]

The Beverly City Schools serve students in public school for pre-Kindergarten through eighth grade, and had an enrollment of 265 students as of the 2010-11 school year.[58]

For ninth through twelfth grades, students in public school from Beverly and Riverton attend Palmyra High School in Palmyra, as part of sending/receiving relationships with the Palmyra Public Schools.[59] Beverly's sending relationship has been in place since 1967 after the City of Burlington Public School District decided that it could no longer accommodate students from Beverly at Burlington City High School.[60]

Students from Beverly, and from all of Burlington County, are eligible to attend the Burlington County Institute of Technology, a countywide public school district that serves the vocational and technical education needs of students at the high school and post-secondary level at its campuses in Medford and Westampton Township.[61]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

The city had a total of 12.53 miles (20.17 km) of roadways, of which 10.84 miles (17.45 km) are maintained by the municipality and 1.69 miles (2.72 km) by Burlington County.[62]

Public transportation[edit]

The Beverly-Edgewater Park station[63] provides service between the Trenton Transit Center in Trenton and the Walter Rand Transportation Center (and other stops) in Camden on New Jersey Transit's River Line light rail system.[64]

New Jersey Transit provides bus service on route 419 between Burlington and Camden.[65][66]

BurLink bus service is offered on the B1 route (between Beverly and Pemberton) and on the B2 route (between Beverly and Westampton Township).[67]

Points of interest[edit]

St. Stephen's Episcopal Church in Beverly, New Jersey

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Beverly include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ Beverly City Clerks Office , City of Beverly. Accessed June 13, 2012.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 38.
  6. ^ GCT-PH1: Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- Place and (in selected states) County Subdivision from 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 13, 2012.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: City of Beverly, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 4, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Beverly city, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 13, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 4. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Beverly city, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed June 13, 2012.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 11, 2012.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Beverly, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed June 13, 2012.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 21, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Beverly, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed November 20, 2013.
  16. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  17. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed June 13, 2012.
  18. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  19. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed June 13, 2012.
  20. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 93. Accessed June 13, 2012.
  21. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Burlington County Municipalities, 1800 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed November 20, 2013.
  22. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed July 8, 2013.
  23. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 263, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed August 21, 2013. "Beverly township contained a population in 1860 of 2,126, in 1870, 2,438." Data includes population for Beverly Township of 906 for 1960 and 1,020 for 1870.
  24. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 259. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed August 21, 2013.
  25. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 335. Accessed June 13, 2012.
  26. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 714. Accessed June 13, 2012.
  27. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network. Accessed June 13, 2012.
  28. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Beverly city, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 8, 2013.
  29. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Beverly city, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 8, 2013.
  30. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Beverly city, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 13, 2012.
  31. ^ Members of the 2013 Beverly City Common Council, City of Beverly. Accessed November 20, 2013.
  32. ^ 2013 Municipal Data Sheet, City of Beverly. Accessed November 20, 2013.
  33. ^ Constantino, Mario. "BEVERLY: New mayor, Democrats tapped", Burlington County Times, November 9, 2011. Accessed November 20, 2013. "Democrat Miller outdistanced Republican Dale Thompson in a battle of newcomers for the city’s top job, a four-year position.Two seats on the City Council also went to the Democrats: incumbents Brian Perkins and Martin V. Bass III. Republican Don Arter edged running mate Robert Thibault, a member of the school board, by a single vote for the other council seat, according to the unofficial results."
  34. ^ O'Sullivan, Jeannie. "Beverly officials promise a bipartisan effort", Burlington County Times, January 10, 2013. Accessed March 22, 2013. "Beverly City Council welcomed the new year at its reorganization on Tuesday. Pictured, left to right, are Democratic Councilmen Robert Lowden, Lawrence Carlbon and Robert Bancroft, and Republican Councilman Robert Thibault. Not pictured is Democratic Councilman Luis Crespo, who did not attend the reorganization.... Democratic Councilmen Robert Bancroft, Lawrence Carlbon and Robert Lowden were sworn in."
  35. ^ November 6, 2012 Summary Report Burlington County Amended Official Results, Burlington County, New Jersey, December 11, 2012. Accessed November 21, 2013.
  36. ^ November 8, 2011 Summary Report Burlington County Official Results, Burlington County, New Jersey, November 18, 2011. Accessed November 21, 2013.
  37. ^ November 2, 2010 Summary Report Burlington County Official Results, Burlington County, New Jersey, December 23, 2010. Accessed November 21, 2013.
  38. ^ O'Sullivan, Jeannie. "City Council appointment draws controversy in Beverly", Burlington County Times, December 27, 2012. Accessed March 22, 2013. "A City Council member who lost his next term in the contested Democratic primary election in June will still be on dais in January. Council President Luis Crespo was appointed Thursday night to fill the seat vacated by Brian Perkins, who has resigned with three years left on his term."
  39. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  40. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 55, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  41. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  42. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  43. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  44. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  45. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  46. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  47. ^ Legislative Roster 2012-2013 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 11, 2012.
  48. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  49. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  50. ^ a b c Staff. Board of Chosen Freeholders, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed July 27, 2014.
  51. ^ Bruce Garganio, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed July 27, 2014.
  52. ^ Joseph Howarth, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed July 27, 2014.
  53. ^ Aimee Belgard, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed July 27, 2014.
  54. ^ Joseph B. Donnelly, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed July 27, 2014.
  55. ^ Joanne Schwartz, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed July 27, 2014.
  56. ^ 2014 County Data Sheet, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed July 27, 2014.
  57. ^ Hefler, Jan. "Garganio again to head Burlco Freeholder Board", The Philadelphia Inquirer, March 29, 2014. Accessed July 27, 2014. "The new director of the Burlington County Freeholder Board is Bruce Garganio, a Republican who led the five-member board for three years before he was defeated in his bid for reelection in November 2011.... Two weeks ago, the county Republican Committee tapped Garganio to fill the one-year vacancy that was created after Leah Arter resigned as freeholder director."
  58. ^ Data for the Beverly City School, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed March 22, 2013.
  59. ^ High School Sending Districts, Burlington County Library System, backed up by the Internet Archive as of September 27, 2006. Accessed November 20, 2013.
  60. ^ Hefler, Jan. "Crowd Opposes Closing Palmyra High", The Philadelphia Inquirer, January 25, 1989. Accessed November 20, 2013. "Palmyra High School students, their parents and their teachers made it abundantly clear at a public meeting last week that they don't want the Board of Education to shut the high school, the first high school built in Burlington County.... Glenn Gray, superintendent of the Beverly School District, which sends about 80 students to Palmyra High School, said the Beverly board was 'reserving opinion' until a decision was announced.... Since 1967, Beverly students have traveled eight miles - 30 minutes by bus - passing through the Riverside and Delran School Districts, to reach Palmyra High. The reason is that Palmyra was the nearest school that could accept the Beverly students when the Burlington City school district ran out of space for them, Gray said."
  61. ^ Why Choose BCIT?, Burlington County Institute of Technology. Accessed November 20, 2013.
  62. ^ Burlington County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed November 20, 2013.
  63. ^ Beverly/Edgewater Park station, New Jersey Transit. Accessed November 20, 2013.
  64. ^ River Line System Map, New Jersey Transit, October 2013. Accessed November 20, 2013.
  65. ^ Burlington County Bus/Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of January 28, 2010. Accessed November 20, 2013.
  66. ^ South Jersey Transit Guide, Cross County Connection, as of April 1, 2010. Accessed November 20, 2013.
  67. ^ BurLink Schedules, Cross County Connection. Accessed November 23, 2013.
  68. ^ Beverly National Cemetery, United States Department of Veterans Affairs. Accessed June 13, 2012.
  69. ^ WEEKLY LIST OF ACTIONS TAKEN ON PROPERTIES: 1/03/00 THROUGH 1/07/00, National Park Service. Accessed June 13, 2012.
  70. ^ O'Sullivan, Jeannie. "Beverly church rings in 175th year", Burlington County Times, March 26, 2012. Accessed June 13, 2012.
  71. ^ Mason, Joe. "Calderone more than just a hero to family, neighbors", Burlington County Times, December 1, 2006. Accessed June 13, 2012. "Born in Beverly and a lifelong area resident, Sam Calderone was an accomplished golfer and football player during his days at Burlington City High School, but his passion was baseball."
  72. ^ Staff. Who's who in the Midwest, p. 477. A.N. Marquis, 1960. Accessed June 13, 2012. "KNIGHT, John Lowden, clergyman; b. Beverly, NJ, Nov. 2, 1915"
  73. ^ Merritt, Abraham; Levy, Michael M. The Moon Pool, p. 303. Wesleyan University Press, 2004. ISBN 0819567078. "Abraham Grace Merritt was born on January 20, 1884, in Beverly, New Jersey, a small town outside of Philadelphia."
  74. ^ Barney Schultz profile, Baseball-Reference.com. Accessed June 25, 2007.
  75. ^ Staff. "Schultz Is Cardinal Hero With Three Innings of Effective Relief Pitching; MOUND JOB CAPS 20 YEARS' EFFORT Schultz, Who Has Played on 20 Teams in 13 Leagues, Is Praised by Keane", The New York Times, October 8, 1964. Accessed June 13, 2012. "Applied to the career of George Warren (Barney) Schultz, the 38-year-old relief pitcher, it is both simply descriptive and the moral of the story.... He was born in Beverly, N. J., which is in the Philadelphia area, and still lives there with his wife and four children."

External links[edit]