Bhaskar–Jagannathan syndrome

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Definition[edit]

Bhaskar–Jagannathan syndrome is an extremely rare genetic disorder and there is a limited amount of information related to it. Similar or related medical conditions are arachnodactyly, aminoaciduria, congenital cataracts, cerebellar ataxia, and delayed developmental milestones.

Symptoms[edit]

Bhaskar–Jagannathan has symptoms such as long fingers, thin fingers, poor balance, incoordination, high levels of amino acids in urine, cataracts during infancy, and ataxia. Ataxia, which is a neurological sign and symptom made up of gross incoordination of muscle movements and is a specific clinical manifestation

Diagnose[edit]

There are three different ways to diagnose Bhaskar–Jagannathan. This disorder may be diagnosed by a urine test, a blood test, and an X-ray of the eyes or other body parts.

Treatment[edit]

Treatment for this rare genetic disorder can be physical therapy, there have been antibiotics found to be affective, and surgery has been found to be another solution.

Prognosis[edit]

For a prognosis, treatment, and any other information, please consult your doctor.

[1] [2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ 1)Bhaskar Jagannathan Syndrome (2012). In IAMUNWELL. Retrieved April 5, 2012, from http://www.iamunwell.com/Diseases-Alphabet-B/bhaskar-jagannathan-syndrome.html
  2. ^ 2)Bhaskar Jagannathan syndrome . RD - Right Diagnosis , 1 Feb. 2012. Web. 5 Apr. 2012. http://www.rightdiagnosis.com/b/bhaskar_jagannathan_syndrome/intro.htm#whatis