Bhurtiya

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Bhurtia/ अहीर भुरटिया
Regions with significant populations
• India •
Languages
HindiAwadhi
Religion
Hinduism
Related ethnic groups
Ahir

The Bhurtia are a Hindu caste found in the state Uttar Pradesh in India. They are also known as Chaurasia, and are a sub-group within the larger Ahir community of South Asia.[1]

Origin[edit]

The Bhurtiya are a sub-division of the Ahir community. Like other Ahirs, they claim descent from the god Krishna. They are said to have immigrated to Gujarat, where they were known as Chaurasia. About three centuries ago, these Chaurasia settled in Awadh. The etymology of the word Bhurtiya is that it is a corruption of the Hindi word phurti, which means quickness. According to their tribal legends, an ancestor of the community was in such a rush, that she left her jewellery, and was given the nickname phurti, and this name was given to her descendents. Over time this was said to be corrupted to Bhurtiya. They are found mainly in the districts of Varanasi, Allahabad, Meerut and Mathura.[2]

Present circumstances[edit]

The Bhurtiya are divided into several gotras, such as Bamaria, Bijlauria, Darariha, Dayarba, Duhilwar, Manhatia, Nurara and Udyana. Marriages are prohibited within the gotra, and the Bhurtiya are strictly endogamous. They are a community of settled agriculturist, with animal husbandry being subsidiary occupation. Like other Ahirs, the community were traditionally graziers, rearing and breeding cattle. They still sell ghee and other dairy products in the towns near their villages. The Bhurtiya are Hindu, and their tribal deities are Dulhadeo, Sheetla Devi and Panch Piria.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ People of India Uttar Pradesh Volume XLII Part One edited by A Hasan & J C Das page 320 to 324 Manohar Publications
  2. ^ People of India Uttar Pradesh Volume XLII Part One edited by A Hasan & J C Das page 320 to 324 Manohar
  3. ^ People of India Uttar Pradesh Volume XLII Part One edited by A Hasan & J C Das page 320 to 324 Manohar