Bible Analyzer

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Bible Analyzer
Developer(s) Timothy Morton
Initial release January 2006
Stable release 4.9.1 / 15 April 2014
Development status Active
Written in Python/wxPython
Operating system Windows XP-8; Macintosh 10.5-10.9, Linux/Ubuntu 8.04-up
Available in English
Type Bible Study Tools
License Copyrighted Freeware
Website www.bibleanalyzer.com

Bible Analyzer is a freeware, cross-platform Bible study computer software application for Microsoft Windows, Macintosh OS X, and Ubuntu Linux. It implements advanced search, comparison, and statistical features of Bible texts as well as more typical Bible software capabilities.[1] It received a high rating for version 4.4 from download.com.[2] The Macintosh edition has also received positive reviews.[3][4]

Overview[edit]

Bible Analyzer is written in Python with a wxPython GUI. According to its author it was first conceived in 2003 to address areas in Bible study and analysis that are largely untouched among other Bible software programs. Primarily features such as Bible text comparison, proximity range searches, and textual statistical analysis. Versions 1.0 through 2.2 concentrated on these features. The version 3 series greatly expanded them and added other features such as a dedicated cross-reference panel, "Related Verse" Searches, Text-To-Speech and Audio features, etc. Version 4.0 includes a major updating of the interface and also a Harmony/Parallel Text Generator, Advanced Related Phrase Search, Multiple Bible Search capabilities, exporting of study data to the "MultiWindow," etc. Version 4.5 introduced the "Session Manager" which allows the user to configure different sessions of modules for various types of studies.

Version 4.7 introduced some original and unique capabilities. Along with the optional Authorized Version People Edition Bible, Bible Analyzer can search for specific individuals using an ID tagging system. Each person in the Bible (as well as all references to deity, including pronouns) is tagged with a unique ID to enable individual searching. For instance, any one (or more) of the six Marys in the Bible can be found at the exclusion of the others. Furthermore, references to deity, such as pronouns, alternate designations, etc., other than by name (God, Jesus, Christ, etc.) can be used as search criteria.[5]

Versions 4.8 and 4.9 introduced among other enhancements a built in Download Manager with which all free and premium modules can be downloaded directly into the program.

Module Format[edit]

Bible Analyzer utilizes Bible, Commentary, Dictionary, Book and Image modules in the open-source SQLite database format. Users can easily create custom modules with the built in "Module Creator." There are scores of free and premium modules available from the Bible Analyzer website.

Bible Analyzer has in its module format such works as E. W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes and Appendices in fully searchable, digital format, the 11 volume Understanding The Bible Commentary[6] by David Sorenson,[7] Books and Charts by Clarence Larkin such as Dispensational Truth, the 23 volume Pulpit Commentary, the 43 volume Expositor's Bible, the 56 volume Biblical Illustrator, and many more.

Bible Analyzer is updated regularly and a CD-Rom with over 1200MB of data is available.

History of Bible Analytics[edit]

The Pioneer of Bible Analytics was Thomas Hartwell Horne (1780–1862), a theologian and librarian. He was born in London and educated at Christ's Hospital. His work named, 'Introduction to the Critical Study and Knowledge of the Holy Scriptures' that was published in 1818 was the beginning of the Bible Statistics. Horne also produced a "Tree Full of Bible Lore," a tree-shaped text of statistics on the Bible, in which he counted the number of books, chapters, verses, words, and even letters. He ended this tree with "It the Bible contains knowledge, wisdom, holiness and love." This "tree" is reproduced in the third series of Ripley's paperbacks, originally published hardbound in 1949. Although he was very wrong with his statistics, it was the beginning...

Reviews[edit]

Bible Software Review, Review of Bible Analyzer version 3.5.2, November 22, 2008.
Download.com, Review, Bible Analyzer, July 19, 2011.
Baptist Basics, Bible Analyzer For Macintosh Recommended, July 21, 2012.
Bible Software Review, Bible Analyzer For Macintosh October 31, 2012


See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]