Big Brother 1 (U.S.)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Big Brother
 
Season 1 (2000)
International Logo of Big Brother.png

Big Brother 1 was the debut season of the American reality television series Big Brother. It was based upon the Netherlands series of the same name, which gained notoriety in 1999 and 2000. The series premiered on July 5, 2000 and lasted for a total of 88 days. The season concluded on September 29, when Eddie McGee was crowned the Winner, and Josh Souza the Runner-Up. The premise of the series drastically differed from future installments of the series. The series revolved around ten strangers living in a house together with no communication with the outside world. They were constantly filmed during their time in the house, and were not permitted to communicate with those filming them. Every other week, each contestant, referred to as "HouseGuests", chose two people to be up for nomination. The two or more people with the most votes were nominated to leave the house. The viewers then decide which of the nominees should leave, with the selected person leaving during a live show. This process continued until only three HouseGuests remained, at which time the viewers would decide which of them would win the $500,000 grand prize. The HouseGuests could be expelled from the house for many reasons such as discussing nominations when not permitted.

Development[edit]

Jamie Kern took part in this season.

The series first launched in Netherlands, with editions in countries such as Germany proving to be hits with the public.[1][2] Following the international success of the series, a bidding war for the rights to series engaged between CBS, ABC, and a cable network,[3] with the series initially set to last 100 days.[4] Mark Itkin, the senior vice president of William Morris, was quoted as saying, "I had no idea the bidding would be so hot. But the show has so many elements, from being on 100 days in a row to an Internet component that is especially attractive to networks."[5] Ultimately, it was confirmed that the show had been picked up by CBS for an estimated $20 million.[6][7] It was later reported that production costs added to an estimated $200,000 per episode.[8] Paul Romer, co-creator of the original series, served as the Executive Producer for the series.[9] On the concept, Romer stated "The show is all about human interactions. It's people who are, loving each other, hating each other. They fight, they cry, they laugh -- all emotions, we'll see in the house."[10] In a later interview, Romer added "The first thing people think of when they hear the Big Brother idea are the sexual things, the nudity, the sexual activity in the house [...] That's not what the show is about."[11]

The first season of Big Brother featured two hosts, Julie Chen and Ian O'Malley.[12] On earning the job, O'Malley stated "I didn’t really know what it was. This is the ground floor of reality television. [But] SAG went on strike [and it was] a very lengthy and very painful strike for many folks."[13] O'Malley was later released from his contract after only one month on the series.[14] The decision to select Chen as the host of the series caused much debate, mainly due to her role on the talk show The Early Show.[15] Andy Rooney of 60 Minutes said Chen's participation in the series was "a further deterioration of news standards", and further controversy arose when it was revealed some of Chen's lines had been scripted.[16] Dr. Drew Pinsky and AOL Online Advisor Regina Lewis appeared once per week on the series to discuss the events in the house.[17] The series was one of the first reality shows to air, and required a crew of over 150 people.[18] The cast for the series was revealed during the premiere. HouseGuest William was revealed to be a member of the Black Panther Party,[19] while Jamie was crowned Miss Washington USA the year prior to her participation on the show.[20] HouseGuests Curtis and Josh had done modeling prior to entering the house.[21] Jean Jordan had been an exotic dancer before entering the house,[22] while Karen and George were married and had children.[23] Series creator John de Mol later stated "The 10 people in our house, you can relate to them. It's the girl next door, it's the guy in the grocery store [...] It's ordinary people, and I think that Big Brother proves ordinary people can be interesting."[24]

The first season of Big Brother premiered on July 5, 2000.[25] The premiere was filmed on July 4, 2000.[26] The series initially aired five nights per week,[27] though a sixth episode was later added into the schedule.[28][29] The addition of a sixth episode per week caused the live banishment episode to move to Wednesday instead of Thursday.[30] Four of these episodes were half-hour daily recap episodes, while one episode was an hourly-long weekly recap; the sixth episode was the live banishment.[31] During the live banishment, the HouseGuest who exits the house was subject to an interview with host Julie Chen.[32] The first season had a total of 67 episodes, the most for any season to date.[33] This season lasted for a total of 88 days.[34] The theme song for the series, known as "Live", was performed by Jonathan Clarke. It was played during the closing credits of each episode, and segments of the theme were played throughout the show. Viewers of the series could also watch the live feeds in the house, which were available for free on the official website.[35] The feed was edited for music copyrights and to protect the privacy of some contestants.[36][37] The feeds also featured a disclaimer for users under the age of 21, due to unedited aspect to the feeds.[38]

House[edit]

The house used for the first season was a one story house with two bedrooms, a kitchen and dining room, and one bathroom.[39] The house was an estimated 1,800 square feet, and was located at the CBS Studio Center in Hollywood, California.[40] Throughout the house, there are a total of 28 cameras and 60 microphones, making all areas of the house visible to the cameras.[41][42] During their stay in the house, the HouseGuests were required to wear microphones at all times, ensuring everything they said in the house was heard.[43] Throughout the house there are two way mirrors lined against the walls, with a production team filming behind them.[44] The bedrooms featured infrared imaging cameras, allowing the cameras to continue filming while the lights were off. The house featured bright colors as part of its theme, with the kitchen being a bright blue and the living room yellow.[45] The two bedrooms in the house were identical, with both featuring a bunk bed and three single beds. The Red Room was where HouseGuests were required to share their thoughts on the events in the house, and were often given tasks.[46][47] The backyard of the house featured a patio area where the HouseGuests could sit outside. The backyard also featured a chicken coop, and the HouseGuests were able to use the eggs from the chickens as food.[48]

Format[edit]

Big Brother is a game show in which a group of contestants, referred to as HouseGuests, lived in isolation from the outside world in a custom built "house", constantly under video surveillance.[49] During their time in the house, the HouseGuests were required to nominate two of their fellow contestants for potential banishment, and the two with the most votes would be nominated.[50] This process was mandatory for all HouseGuests, and failure to comply could result in expulsion from the house.[51] The public, through a vote conducted by phone, would vote to banish one of the nominated HouseGuests from the house, and the HouseGuest with the most votes from the viewers would be banished from the house.[52] When only three HouseGuests remained, the viewers would vote for which of them should win the series, and the HouseGuest with the most votes would become the winner. The HouseGuests were competing for a $500,000 cash prize,[53][54] though the Runner-Up of the series would receive $100,000 and the second Runner-Up would receive $50,000.[17]

During their time in the house, HouseGuests were given weekly tasks to perform.[55] The HouseGuests would wager a portion of their weekly shopping budget on the task, and would either win double their wagered fund or lose the wagered fund depending on their performance in the task.[56] The HouseGuests were required to work as a group to complete the task, with the format of the tasks varying based on the amount of remaining HouseGuests. Should the HouseGuests run out of the food provided for them, an emergency ration was available to them. The HouseGuests were forbidden from discussing nominations, and doing so could result in punishment.[57][58] The format of the series was mainly seen as a social experiment, and required HouseGuests to interact with others who may have differing ideals, beliefs, and prejudices.[59][60] HouseGuests were also required to make visits to the Red Room during their stay in the house, where they were able to share their thoughts and feelings on their fellow HouseGuests and the game.[61]

HouseGuests[edit]

The cast of Big Brother 1.

Top: Curtis, Brittany, Cassandra and Josh.
Middle: Karen, Jean Jordan and George.
Bottom: Will Mega, Eddie and Jamie.

The first season of Big Brother featured ten HouseGuests, each of which were complete strangers. All of the HouseGuests were from different states except for Eddie and Curtis, both of whom were from New York. Eddie was the youngest HouseGuests, at 21, while Karen was the oldest, at 43. The viewers were introduced to Beth, a potential eleventh HouseGuest, though she ultimately did not enter. Big Brother 1 is the only season to feature ten HouseGuests, with subsequent seasons featuring at least twelve or more.

Name Age on entry Profession Hometown
Brittany Petros 25 Actress Robbinsdale, Minnesota
Cassandra Waldon 37 UN communications director Annapolis, Maryland
Curtis Kin 28 Lawyer New York City, New York
Eddie McGee 21 Entertainment industry Commack, New York
George Boswell 41 Roofer Rockford, Illinois
Jamie Kern 22 Model Seattle, Washington
Jean Jordan 26 Exotic dancer Roanoke, Virginia
Josh Souza 23 Civil engineering student San Jose, California
Karen Fowler 43 Mother Columbus, Indiana
William Collins 27 Politician Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Summary[edit]

On Day 1, Brittany, Cassandra, Curtis, Eddie, Karen, George, Jamie, Jordan, Josh, and William entered the house.[62][63] On Day 2, HouseGuests were given their first task to complete. They were required to solve a word puzzle, which would inform them of the location to find money for groceries. They were successful, and earned $100 as a group.[62] On Day 3, HouseGuests were given the task of building a clock out of potatoes in the house.[64] Should they fail this task, they would not know the time in the house; they passed the task.[65] On Day 4, HouseGuests were given the task of making plaster masks of the HouseGuests.[62] On Day 5, one of the chickens in the backyard was injured. It was removed from the house, and brought back later to be nursed back to health.[66] On Day 7, HouseGuests were given their first weekly task. For this, they were given the names of dozens of celebrities, and had to state whether they were dead or alive.[62] They were given days to attempt to recall the correct answers, and would be quizzed about it at a later date. They wagered 20% of their weekly budget on this task, which they ultimately failed.[17] William intentionally failed his portion of the challenge, upsetting many HouseGuests.[67] On Day 9, the HouseGuests participated in their first round of nominations. William and Jordan were announced as the nominees this week, with William receiving six nominations and Jordan receiving five.[68] Josh, Jamie, George, and Cassandra all received no nominations this week.[17] HouseGuests were later given their new task, which required them to ride a stationary exercise bike to achieve a total distance of 1,000 miles.[62] They wagered 50% of their weekly budget on this task, which they passed.[17] HouseGuests were later given another task, in which they were required to imitate another HouseGuest in the Red Room.[17] On Day 16, William became the first HouseGuest to be banished from the house when he received 73% of the public vote.[69][70]

On Day 20, HouseGuests are given their new weekly challenge, in which they had days to practice making a set of dominoes fall down in a single session. They had to set up 12,100 dominoes to form the series logo, and then make them all fall by knocking only one domino over.[62] The group passed this task, which they wagered 20% on.[17] The HouseGuests later held a fake trial dealing with the issue of flag burning, with Karen as the judge, Jordan being on trial, Brittany being a witness, Curtis and Cassandra as lawyers, and the other HouseGuests as members of the jury.[62] On Day 22, HouseGuests participated in the second round of nominations. Curtis and Jordan became the second set of nominated HouseGuests this season, with Curtis receiving six nominations and Jordan receiving five nominations.[71] Josh, Jamie, Cassandra, and Brittany received no nominations this week, making it the second time in a row that Josh, Jamie, and Cassandra had received no nominations from their fellow HouseGuests. HouseGuests were later given their new weekly task, which required them to ride a stationary bike for a total of one-thousand miles. They wagered 50% of their shopping budget on the task, which they passed.[17] The HouseGuests were later given another task, which required them to split into three teams and attempt to toss water balloons to their teammates from across the pool.[17] The team of Eddie, Cassandra, and George were the winners, though there was no reward. On Day 28, the HouseGuests held a roast for Curtis and Jordan as they were marked for banishment. On Day 30, Jordan became the second HouseGuest to be banished from the house when she received 78% of the public vote.[72][73]

HouseGuests were given their new weekly task, which required them to write a poem pertaining to the game. They would then have to jump rope together while the rope holders recited the poem. They had one chance to correctly complete the poem, and failure to do so would result in the group failing the task. They wagered 30% of their shopping budget on the task, which they ultimately failed.[62] HouseGuests were later given the task of hosting their own daytime talk show.[17] On Day 36, HouseGuests participated in a live challenge in which they had to vote for one HouseGuest to receive a phone call from home; they voted for George.[17] That night, it was revealed that Cassandra, Josh, and Karen had been marked for banishment due to a tie in the voting process.[74] George was the only HouseGuest to receive no nominations this week. That same night, the HouseGuests were given their new weekly task, which required them to take care of a pug named Chiquita.[75] In the days following her nomination, Karen began to ask the viewers to banish her from the house as she missed her children.[76] HouseGuests were later given their new weekly task, in which they were required to make eight raspberry and eight blueberry pies, and split into teams named after the various pies. The first team to eat all eight of their pies would choose how the weekly allowance was spent.[17] On Day 44, HouseGuests participated in a live challenge in which they were tempted with a reward in exchange for watching the nominations process. They ultimately chose not to watch the nominations, thus were not given a prize.[17] That night, Karen became the third HouseGuest to be banished from the house as she had received 76% of the public vote.[77]

HouseGuests were given their new weekly task, which required the HouseGuests to memorize all of the major highways in the country. They would then be required to state what highways would get them from one city to another. The group wagered 20% of their shopping budget on this task, which they passed.[17] The group was later given a new task in which they were required to paint each other like animals.[17] In another task for the week, HouseGuests competed in a sumo wrestling competition in an attempt to win a luxury massage. Eddie was the winner, with former HouseGuest William secretly giving him a bad massage.[78] For their next weekly task, the HouseGuests were required to have two HouseGuests dancing at all times. When cued, all HouseGuests would be required to dance at the same time. They passed this task, which they wagered 20% of their weekly budget on.[17] On Day 50, the HouseGuests participated in their fourth round of nominations. Due to a tie in the voting, Brittany, Cassandra, Curtis, Eddie, George, and Josh all being marked for banishment.[79] For the first time, all of the HouseGuests received at least one nomination from their fellow HouseGuests. That same night, Jamie won a two minute conversation with a casting director due to winning a task earlier in the week.[17] HouseGuests were later given a task in which they had to name a "Mr. and Miss Big Brother 2000", with Eddie, Brittany, and Cassandra being given the title; they won a dinner with the meal of their choice.[17] On Day 58, Jamie was given a live task in which she was able to co-host the episode with Julie Chen, including announce who had been banished from the house.[17] That night, it was revealed that Brittany had become the fourth HouseGuest to be banished from the house when she received 34% of the public vote.[80][81]

HouseGuests were given their new weekly task, which required them to build a puzzle that featured 4,928 pieces by the end of the week. The group wagered 50% of their weekly shopping budget on this task, which they passed.[17] The HouseGuests were later given the task of discussing whether or not they would be willing to split the total prize money.[17] On Day 64, it was revealed that Cassandra, Curtis, and Eddie had been marked for banishment.[82] Much like the previous round of nominations, all of the HouseGuests received at least one nomination from their fellow HouseGuests. Following this, the six remaining HouseGuests were offered $20,000 to walk from the game, with this offer later rising to $50,000.[83] Should one of the HouseGuests accept the offer, a new HouseGuest named Beth was set to enter the house and the nominations would be voided.[84][85] Ultimately, none of the HouseGuests took the offer, thus Beth did not enter the game.[86] That same night, Brittany was able to talk to Josh as part of a task.[87] HouseGuests were later given a new task in which they had to estimate the price of a luxury item requested by another HouseGuest. If they came within one dollar of the correct price, they would earn that luxury.[17] For their new weekly task, the HouseGuests had to train Chiquita to go through an obstacle course. The group passed this task, which they wagered 20% of their weekly budget on.[17] During a luxury competition, Curtis won the reward of going to the 52nd Primetime Emmy Awards.[88] On Day 72, HouseGuests were given the live task of writing a message to be flown on a banner plane above the house.[17] That same night, Cassandra became the fifth HouseGuest to be banished from the house as she had received 46% of the public vote.[89][90]

HouseGuests were given their new weekly task, which required at least one HouseGuest to be juggling at all times. They were not permitted to drop more than two balls, or they would fail the task. The group wagered 50% on the task, which they ultimately failed.[17] On Day 74, the HouseGuests were given another live task in which they had five minutes to make a phone call to a loved one. The timer did not stop while the HouseGuests were dialing.[17] That same night, the group made their nominations live for the first time. It was revealed that Curtis, Eddie, George, and Jamie were marked for banishment.[91] Josh received no nominations this week, and was the only HouseGuest not to be marked for banishment.[17] HouseGuests were later given a new task in which they had to write lyrics for the show's theme song, and were later required to record their song in the Red Room.[17] In another task for the week, the HouseGuests attempted to find Chiquita in the house, with the winner being able to present the weather from inside the house; Josh was the winner.[17] On Day 79, the five remaining HouseGuests were asked to select one of the previously banished HouseGuests to return to the house in a matter of days; they chose Cassandra.[17] That night, George became the sixth HouseGuest to be banished from the house as he had received 51% of the public vote.[92]

HouseGuests were given their new weekly task, in which they were required to determine whether or not specific news articles had actually appeared in the news or not. The group wagered 50% of their weekly shopping budget on the task, which they passed.[17] The group was later given another task in which they played the Big Brother board game.[17] On Day 81, the HouseGuests participated in their second round of live nominations. Due to a tie in the voting, all four of the remaining HouseGuests were marked for banishment.[93] This was the final round of nominations for the season. Former HouseGuest Cassandra entered the house as a guest that same night, as the HouseGuests had selected her to return days prior.[17] Due to a new task, Josh was selected to become a saboteur in the house, and performed tasks such as setting time back on the potato clock. If one of the other three HouseGuests correctly guessed that Josh was the saboteur, they would win a new flat screen television; Curtis won this prize.[17] On Day 86, Jamie became the seventh HouseGuest to be banished from the house as she had received 31% of the public vote.[94] Chiquita also exited the house that night, and was adopted by a couple upon her exit.[95] On Day 88, it was revealed that Curtis had come in third place, receiving 14% of the public vote to win.[96] Minutes later, it was revealed that Josh had come in second place with 27% of the public vote, meaning Eddie had been crowned the winner with a total of 59% of the public vote.[97][98][99]

Nominations table[edit]

Week 2 Week 4 Week 6 Week 8 Week 10 Week 11 Week 12 Nominations received
Day 81 Finale
Eddie Jordan,
William
Curtis,
Jordan
Curtis,
Jamie
Curtis,
Jamie
Cassandra,
Curtis
George,
Jamie
Curtis,
Jamie
Winner
(Day 88)
17
Josh Brittany,
Curtis
Curtis,
George
Curtis,
Karen
Cassandra,
Curtis
Cassandra,
Curtis
Curtis,
George
Curtis,
Jamie
Runner-Up
(Day 88)
10
Curtis Karen,
William
Eddie,
Karen
Eddie,
Josh
Eddie,
Josh
Eddie,
George
Eddie,
George
Eddie,
Josh
Third Place
(Day 88)
18
Jamie Jordan,
William
Curtis,
Eddie
Josh,
Karen
Eddie,
George
Cassandra,
Eddie
Eddie,
George
Eddie,
Josh
Banished
(Day 86)
7
George Jordan,
William
Curtis,
Jordan
Cassandra,
Josh
Brittany,
Josh
Curtis,
Josh
Curtis,
Jamie
Banished
(Day 79)
9
Cassandra Brittany,
Eddie
Eddie,
Jordan
Brittany,
Karen
Brittany,
George
Eddie,
Jamie
Banished
(Day 72)
8
Brittany Jordan,
William
Curtis,
Jordan
Cassandra,
Josh
Cassandra,
George
Banished
(Day 58)
6
Karen Jordan,
William
Curtis,
Jordan
Cassandra,
Josh
Banished
(Day 44)
7
Jordan Eddie,
Karen
Eddie,
Karen
Banished
(Day 30)
10
William Brittany,
Eddie
Banished
(Day 16)
6
Notes none 1 2, 3 4 5 3, 6 7
Marked for
Banishment
Jordan,
William
Curtis,
Jordan
Cassandra,
Josh,
Karen
Brittany,
Cassandra,
Curtis,
Eddie,
George,
Josh
Cassandra,
Curtis,
Eddie
Curtis,
Eddie,
George,
Jamie
Curtis,
Eddie,
Jamie,
Josh
Curtis,
Eddie,
Josh
Banished William
73%
to banish
Jordan
78%
to banish
Karen
76%
to banish
Brittany
34%
to banish
Cassandra
46%
to banish
George
51%
to banish
Jamie
31%
to banish
Curtis
14%
to win
Josh
27%
to win
Eddie
59%
to win

Notes[edit]

  • ^Note 1 : Cassandra and Karen had three nominations each, Josh had five. Due to the tie, three HouseGuests were "Marked for Banishment".
  • ^Note 2 : There was a five way tie between Brittany, Cassandra, Curtis, Eddie, and Josh each receiving two nomination vote each. George received three nomination votes. Due to the five way tie, six HouseGuests were "Marked for Banishment."
  • ^Note 3 : The percentage results were not revealed during the live show.
  • ^Note 4 : There was a three way tie between Cassandra, Eddie, and Curtis. As a result they were "Marked for Banishment."
  • ^Note 5 : Curtis, Eddie, and Jamie received two nomination votes each. As a result, they were "Marked for Banishment" along with George.
  • ^Note 6 : On Day 81, Cassandra visited the remaining HouseGuests for a discussion. There was a tie between all four HouseGuests so all were "Marked for Banishment."
  • ^Note 7 : The viewers voted for who to win, not to banish.

Reception[edit]

Ratings[edit]

Big Brother 1 premiered on July 5, 2000 in the US, with the season premiere having over 22 million viewers.[100] Despite the high premiere, ratings for the series quickly began to decline, and the series quickly dropped out of the Top 10 slot in terms of viewers.[100][101] Ratings began to decline even more following the banishments of Will "Mega" and Jordan, who were both seen as colorful characters in the game.[62] Big Brother 1 was noted as having its highest ratings on Wednesdays, when it aired after the hugely successful Survivor: Borneo.[102] The Saturday, July 8 episode was beaten out by an episode of the reality series Cops.[100] This episode saw ratings lower from the previous episode.[103] Ratings continued to drop, with at one point the series had fallen behind re-runs of shows such as Friends.[104] The Monday, September 4 episode only achieved 5.5.[105] Cassandra's banishment episode did see an increase in ratings, however, receiving 12.5 million viewers.[106] Big Brother 1 has typically been cited as "boring" by critics and fans of the series. John Carman of The San Francisco Chronicle stated "Wondering 'Will Karen run out of Kleenex?' is about the most interesting thing about Big Brother."[107] Joyce Millman of Salon.com felt that ratings for the series dropped due to the "boring" cast.[108] The New York Times later reported that CBS was disappointed with the series.[109] Despite the decline in ratings, the series' official website did receive a large amount of traffic, due to the live feed being available there.[110] It was also noted that as the ratings decreased, traffic onto the main site increased.[110]

Controversy & criticism[edit]

"Chicken" George Boswell was the center of much controversy.

Upon its announcement, the series has come under fire for both controversy and criticism. After the premiere of the first season, Chicago attorney Marvin Rosenblum filed a lawsuit against CBS, then corporate parent Viacom, and the production company Orwell Productions for alleged copyright infringement. Rosenblum, a producer of the film 1984, owns the film and TV rights to the novel Nineteen Eighty-Four and claimed the show "illegally borrows from it."[111] Rosenblum accused the network of illegally using the Big Brother moniker from the novel Nineteen Eighty-Four and "deceiving the public into thinking the author's classic novel was the origin of the show." CBS, Viacom, and Orwell Productions filed a motion to dismiss the $20 million lawsuit.[112] The dismissal was denied on January 4, 2001. In 2001 Rosenblum, CBS and Viacom settled the lawsuit under undisclosed terms.[113]

Numerous events occurred during the game that sparked controversy as well. The show's security was breached early in the series when two publicity-seeking screenwriters threw a tennis ball stuffed with fake news stories - including one in which then President of the United States, Bill Clinton, purportedly called Big Brother a "national disgrace" - into the house's garden after finding it was unguarded. The HouseGuests were also communicated with by a plane towing a banner reading: "Big Brother is worse than you think. Get out now."[17] The show also came under criticism after HouseGuest George Boswell's wife and family began campaigning for viewers to vote out some of the more popular HouseGuests to keep George in the game. Recently evicted HouseGuest Brittany, who was permitted to talk to Josh for a certain amount of time, informed Josh of this news. Various "anti-George" banners were flown over the house, leading Josh to inform them of the news.[114] Various other points in the game led to the HouseGuests feeling they were being portrayed poorly, and they would often be required to do acts they didn't necessarily feel like doing.[115] George then decided he would walk from the game, and attempted to convince the other HouseGuests to walk with him as well during a live episode.[116] Ultimately, none of the HouseGuests chose to leave the game.

Renewal[edit]

Despite the lack of strong ratings and numerous controversies surrounding the series, Big Brother did help earn CBS a 17% increase for its time slot, and was ultimately renewed in September 2000 for a second season.[117] It was then confirmed, however, that there would be numerous changes to the format of the series.[118]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Andrews, Edmund L. (April 11, 2000). "Hilversum Journal; Europe's 'Reality' TV: Chains and Big Brother". The New York Times. 
  2. ^ http://www.spiegel.de/politik/deutschland/news-digest-do-germans-like-to-watch-a-67267.html
  3. ^ Carter, Bill (June 2, 2000). "CBS's 'Survivor' Is Winner for Network; Real-Life Show Pulls in Younger Viewers". The New York Times. 
  4. ^ Kaplan, Don. New York Post http://www.nypost.com/p/entertainment/tv/item_EMmtBHB2SGu38DbeiPwnBL |url= missing title (help). 
  5. ^ Carter, Bill (January 30, 2000). "Television's New Voyeurism Pictures Real-Life Intimacy". The New York Times. 
  6. ^ Time. February 21, 2000 http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,2050523,00.html |url= missing title (help). 
  7. ^ http://www.broadcastingcable.com/article/136389-Survivor_Highly_ratted.php
  8. ^ Weinraub, Bernard (February 9, 2000). "Sudden Explosion of Game Shows Threatens the Old TV Staples; Costly Sitcoms and Dramas Scramble for Space and Survival". The New York Times. 
  9. ^ http://studyguides.rivassl.com/study-guide-to-big-brother-channel-4/72/
  10. ^ "CNN Transcript". CNN. 
  11. ^ http://jam.canoe.ca/Television/TV_Shows/B/Big_Brother/2000/07/04/734950.html
  12. ^ http://www.realityblurred.com/realitytv/archives/big_brother/2010_Jul_05_10th_anniversary
  13. ^ http://www.realityblurred.com/realitytv/archives/big_brother/2007_Sep_16_ian_omalley_interview
  14. ^ http://www.realityblurred.com/realitytv/archives/big_brother/2000_Aug_07_ian_omalley_gets
  15. ^ http://www.people.com/people/archive/article/0,,20132352,00.html
  16. ^ Rutenberg, Jim (August 7, 2000). "MEDIA TALK; 'Big Brother' Host Seeking Credibility". The New York Times. 
  17. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai http://attwx.com/bb1.shtml
  18. ^ http://www.salon.com/2000/08/08/watching_bb/
  19. ^ http://www.realityblurred.com/realitytv/archives/big_brother/2000_Jul_14_tabloid_says_wills
  20. ^ http://jam.canoe.ca/Television/TV_Shows/B/Big_Brother/2000/07/06/734949.html
  21. ^ http://www.realityblurred.com/realitytv/archives/big_brother/2000_Jul_22_secrets_revealed
  22. ^ http://jam.canoe.ca/Television/TV_Shows/B/Big_Brother/2000/07/06/734948.html
  23. ^ http://www.realityblurred.com/realitytv/archives/big_brother/2000_Aug_17_a_teary_loving
  24. ^ "Big Brother hits the US". BBC News. July 6, 2000. 
  25. ^ http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/media/july-dec00/reality_7-5.html
  26. ^ http://www.videopark.com/bb.htm
  27. ^ http://www.salon.com/2000/07/12/reality/
  28. ^ Kaplan, Don. New York Post http://www.nypost.com/p/entertainment/tv/item_aR9o83Lcvb72tMW1CcWQmI |url= missing title (help). 
  29. ^ http://www.pbs.org/newshour/forum/july00/reality.html
  30. ^ http://www.realityblurred.com/realitytv/archives/big_brother/2000_Jul_19_big_brother_to_be
  31. ^ http://articles.baltimoresun.com/2000-07-14/features/0007140218_1_big-brother-real-world-viewers
  32. ^ http://www.tvguide.com/news/big-blow-49191.aspx
  33. ^ http://www.tv.com/shows/big-brother/season-1/?expanded=1
  34. ^ http://www.uta.edu/utamagazine/archive-issues/winter_2001/stories/eddietop5.htm
  35. ^ http://articles.baltimoresun.com/2000-07-14/features/0007140218_1_big-brother-real-world-viewers
  36. ^ http://www.thefutoncritic.com/news.aspx?id=20050706cbs02
  37. ^ http://www.thefutoncritic.com/news.aspx?id=20070611cbs01
  38. ^ http://www.streamingmedia.com/Articles/ReadArticle.aspx?ArticleID=64260
  39. ^ Rich, Frank (July 1, 2000). "Journal; Voyeurism for the Entire Family". The New York Times. 
  40. ^ http://www.mrpopculture.com/content/2000/46-2000/316-april-22-2000
  41. ^ The New York Times http://partners.nytimes.com/library/magazine/home/20000521mag-internet.html |url= missing title (help). 
  42. ^ http://articles.philly.com/2000-07-17/news/25609365_1_voyeurism-private-life-private-space
  43. ^ The New York Times http://partners.nytimes.com/library/magazine/home/20000521mag-internet.html |url= missing title (help). 
  44. ^ http://www.theguardian.com/g2/story/0,3604,341936,00.html
  45. ^ http://www.videopark.com/bb.htm
  46. ^ http://emceesteve.tripod.com/column_8_17_00.htm
  47. ^ http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/culturebox/2000/06/big_brother_the_est_session_from_hell.html
  48. ^ James, Caryn (August 24, 2000). "Critic's Notebook; Machiavelli, on a Desert Isle, Meets TV's Reality. Unreal". The New York Times. 
  49. ^ Braxton, Greg (September 11, 2000). "'Big Brother' Guests Threaten Walkout". Los Angeles Times. 
  50. ^ "BB1 Ep. #1". Big Brother. Season 1. Episode 1. July 5, 2000.
  51. ^ http://www.broadcastnow.co.uk/aol-bags-internet-rights-to-big-brother/1195921.article
  52. ^ "Big Brother USA and Canada format explained - Big Brother 2013 Secrets & Lies Features". bbspy. 2013-03-01. Retrieved 2013-07-08. 
  53. ^ McFarland, Melanie (July 5, 2000). "Realer than 'Real World': 'Big Brother' drama begins". The Seattle Times. 
  54. ^ http://www.videopark.com/bb.htm
  55. ^ Carter, Bill (June 2, 2000). "CBS's 'Survivor' Is Winner for Network; Real-Life Show Pulls in Younger Viewers". The New York Times. 
  56. ^ http://attwx.com/bb1.shtml
  57. ^ "Big Brother throws out 'Nasty Nick'". BBC News. August 17, 2000. 
  58. ^ "Tom going strong in Big Brother". BBC News. August 18, 2000. 
  59. ^ Milmo, Cahal (August 1, 2000). "Psychologists in trouble for 'Big Brother'". The Independent (London). 
  60. ^ http://www.theguardian.com/media/2000/sep/15/bigbrother.tvandradio
  61. ^ http://www.tv.com/shows/big-brother/season-1/
  62. ^ a b c d e f g h i http://www.salon.com/2000/07/19/bb_episodes/
  63. ^ http://www.tv.com/shows/big-brother/bb1-ep-1-168184/
  64. ^ http://www.tv.com/shows/big-brother/bb1-ep-2-168185/
  65. ^ http://www.aoltv.com/2008/06/16/six-reality-tv-classic-moments-from-big-brother-1-videos/
  66. ^ http://www.realityblurred.com/realitytv/archives/big_brother/2000_Jul_10_its_all_fun_and
  67. ^ http://www.sitemouse.com/users/bigbrother/earlyshow.shtml
  68. ^ http://www.realityblurred.com/realitytv/archives/big_brother/2000_Jul_13_marked_for_banishment
  69. ^ http://www.realityblurred.com/realitytv/archives/big_brother/2000_Jul_23_wills_banishment
  70. ^ http://www.eonline.com.tcpopt.cottest.com/news/40179/survivor-kelly-wanted-by-the-law
  71. ^ http://jam.canoe.ca/Television/TV_Shows/B/Big_Brother/2000/08/03/734938.html
  72. ^ http://www.realityblurred.com/realitytv/archives/big_brother/2000_Aug_03_jordan_gets_banished
  73. ^ http://www.salon.com/2000/09/29/jordan_5/
  74. ^ http://www.realityblurred.com/realitytv/archives/big_brother/2000_Aug_10_karen_josh_and
  75. ^ http://www.goodnewsforpets.com/Articles.asp?ID=109
  76. ^ http://journaltimes.com/news/national/life-after-big-brother-begins-for-contestants/article_f02812f8-7315-56f1-b04d-93c4d279e31f.html
  77. ^ http://www.realityblurred.com/realitytv/archives/big_brother/2000_Aug_17_a_teary_loving
  78. ^ http://www.realityblurred.com/realitytv/archives/big_brother/2000_Aug_22_eddie_gets_rubbed
  79. ^ http://www.realityblurred.com/realitytv/archives/big_brother/2000_Aug_24_nominations_are
  80. ^ http://www.realityblurred.com/realitytv/archives/big_brother/2000_Aug_31_brittany_banished
  81. ^ http://hbkoplowitz.com/LIC/bb3/index.html
  82. ^ http://www.realityblurred.com/realitytv/archives/big_brother/2000_Sep_07_house_guests_to
  83. ^ http://www.realityblurred.com/realitytv/archives/big_brother/2000_Sep_02_next_wednesday
  84. ^ http://www.realityblurred.com/realitytv/archives/big_brother/2000_Sep_04_if_someone_takes
  85. ^ Carter, Bill (September 4, 2000). "'Big Brother' Hopes to Engineer an Exit, Then Add a Face". The New York Times. 
  86. ^ http://jam.canoe.ca/Television/TV_Shows/B/Big_Brother/2000/09/07/734935.html
  87. ^ http://www.realityblurred.com/realitytv/archives/big_brother/2000_Sep_09_canshould_josh
  88. ^ http://www.realityblurred.com/realitytv/archives/big_brother/2000_Sep_10_curtis_goes_to_the
  89. ^ http://www.realityblurred.com/realitytv/archives/big_brother/2000_Sep_14_banishment_with
  90. ^ http://jam.canoe.ca/Television/TV_Shows/B/Big_Brother/2000/09/14/734953.html
  91. ^ http://www.realityblurred.com/realitytv/archives/big_brother/2000_Sep_17_all_four_house_guests
  92. ^ http://www.realityblurred.com/realitytv/archives/big_brother/2000_Sep_21_the_chicken_man
  93. ^ http://www.realityblurred.com/realitytv/archives/big_brother/2000_Sep_25_curtis_eddie_jamie
  94. ^ http://www.realityblurred.com/realitytv/archives/big_brother/2000_Sep_28_bye_bye_jamie_and
  95. ^ http://articles.philly.com/2000-10-03/news/25586693_1_robots-bars-animatronic
  96. ^ http://www.realityblurred.com/realitytv/archives/big_brother/2000_Sep_29_eddie_wins_big_brother
  97. ^ "Eddie wins big in US Big Brother". BBC News. September 30, 2000. 
  98. ^ http://www.mademan.com/mm/big-brother-winners-where-are-they-now.html
  99. ^ http://jam.canoe.ca/Television/TV_Shows/B/Big_Brother/2000/09/29/734946.html
  100. ^ a b c Burr, Ty (July 12, 2000). "True Man Show". Entertainment Weekly. 
  101. ^ http://www.salon.com/2000/07/11/big_brother_2/
  102. ^ "After 'Survivor': A reality TV check". CNN. August 25, 2000. 
  103. ^ http://www.realityblurred.com/realitytv/archives/big_brother/2000_Jul_10_big_brothers_ratings
  104. ^ Time. July 7, 2000 http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,49315,00.html |url= missing title (help). 
  105. ^ http://www.imdb.com/news/ni0097720/
  106. ^ http://www.realityblurred.com/realitytv/archives/big_brother/2000_Sep_14_125_million_watched
  107. ^ http://www.realityblurred.com/realitytv/archives/big_brother/2000_Jul_13_even_big_brothers
  108. ^ http://www.realityblurred.com/realitytv/archives/big_brother/2000_Jul_11_big_brother_sucks
  109. ^ http://www.realityblurred.com/realitytv/archives/big_brother/2000_Aug_28_cbs_execs_disappointed
  110. ^ a b Robischon, Noah (August 4, 2000). "Now, Voyeur". Entertainment Weekly. 
  111. ^ Reese, Lori (September 5, 2000). "Eye Brawl". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved 2008-04-19. 
  112. ^ Grossberg, Josh (January 4, 2001). ""Big Brother" Lawsuit Survives First Round". E! Online. Archived from the original on 8 May 2008. Retrieved 2008-04-19. 
  113. ^ Jennings, Jay (April 14, 2001). "Can Sheer Coincidence Be Trademarked?". The New York Times. Retrieved 2008-04-19. 
  114. ^ http://www.salon.com/2000/09/09/bb_walkout/
  115. ^ http://www.salon.com/2000/08/22/bb_web/
  116. ^ Braxton, Greg (September 11, 2000). "'Big Brother' Guests Threaten Walkout". Los Angeles Times. 
  117. ^ http://homes.chass.utoronto.ca/~ikalmar/illustex/bigbrother.html
  118. ^ http://www.realityblurred.com/realitytv/archives/big_brother_2/2001_May_29_big_brother_2_audience

External links[edit]