Big East Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Big East Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year
Big East Conference logo.svg
Awarded for the most outstanding male basketball player in the Big East Conference
Country United States
First awarded 1980 (by original Big East)
2014 (by current Big East)
Currently held by Doug McDermott, Creighton

The Big East Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year award is given to the men's basketball player in the Big East Conference voted as the top performer by the conference coaches. It was first awarded by the original Big East Conference at the end of the league's inaugural season of 1979–80. When the conference split along football lines in 2013, the seven schools of the original Big East that did not play FBS football joined with three other schools and formed a new Big East Conference, with the FBS schools remaining in the former Big East structure under the new name of American Athletic Conference (The American).

The head coaches of the league's teams (currently 10) submit their votes following the end of the regular season and before the conference's tournament in early March. The coaches cannot vote for their own players.[1]

The award was introduced following the conference's first season in 1980, in which it was presented to John Duren of Georgetown. Patrick Ewing, Richard Hamilton, and Troy Murphy each won the award twice, and Chris Mullin won three consecutive times from 1983 through 1985.[2][3] Ewing, who shared the award in 1984 and 1985 with Mullin, was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 2008 after playing 17 years in the National Basketball Association between 1985 and 2002.[4] Mullin was inducted into the Naismith Hall in 2011 after a 16-year NBA career (1985–2001).[5] Another award winner, Alonzo Mourning (1992), will be inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014 following a 16-year NBA career (1992–2008).[6] There have been six ties; the most recent instance was that between DeJuan Blair of Pittsburgh and Hasheem Thabeet of Connecticut in 2009.[7]

Five players have been awarded a major national player of the year award in the same year that they received a Big East Player of the Year award. In 1985, Ewing and Mullin shared the conference award, while Ewing was named Naismith College Player of the Year and Mullin was given the John R. Wooden Award. The following year, Walter Berry received the Wooden Award and the Big East Player of the Year award.[8][9] In 1996, Ray Allen of Connecticut received the conference award and was also the final recipient of the UPI Player of the Year Award.[10] In 2014, the first season of the new non-football Big East, Doug McDermott received both the Naismith[11] and Wooden Awards[12] along with the conference award.[13] Georgetown has had the most winners, with eight. As of 2014, six of the seven teams that launched the new Big East in 2013 have had at least one winner, with Providence the only exception. The core group of seven schools invited three other schools to join them in the new conference in 2013: Butler, Creighton, and Xavier. Creighton has already had a winner with the aforementioned McDermott. As of 2014, the award has been given 41 times in 35 seasons. Thirty-five players from 12 schools have received the award: 19 seniors, 13 juniors, nine sophomores, and no freshmen.

Key[edit]

Co-Players of the Year
* Awarded a national Player of the Year award:
Helms Foundation College Basketball Player of the Year (1904–05 to 1978–79)
UPI College Basketball Player of the Year (1954–55 to 1995–96)
Naismith College Player of the Year (1968–69 to present)
John R. Wooden Award (1976–77 to present)
Player (X) Denotes the number of times the player has been awarded the Big East Player of the Year award at that point

Winners[edit]

Patrick Ewing (#33 jersey) won a share of the award in 1984 and 1985.
Alonzo Mourning was the third Georgetown center to win the award.
Chris Mullin is the only player to win the award three times, winning in 1983, 1984, and 1985.
Ray Allen was the second Connecticut player to win the award.
Luke Harangody won the award in 2008.
Season Player School Position Class Reference
1979–80 Duren, JohnJohn Duren Georgetown Guard Senior [14][15]
1980–81 Bagley, JohnJohn Bagley Boston College Point guard Sophomore [16]
1981–82 Callandrillo, DanDan Callandrillo Seton Hall Shooting guard Senior [17]
1982–83 Mullin, ChrisChris Mullin St. John's Small forward Sophomore [3][18]
1983–84 Ewing, PatrickPatrick Ewing Georgetown Center Junior [14][15]
1983–84 Mullin, ChrisChris Mullin (2) St. John's Small forward Junior [3][18]
1984–85 Ewing, PatrickPatrick Ewing* (2) Georgetown Center Senior [14][15]
1984–85 Mullin, ChrisChris Mullin* (3) St. John's Small forward Senior [3][18]
1985–86 Berry, WalterWalter Berry* St. John's Power forward Senior [19]
1986–87 Williams, ReggieReggie Williams Georgetown Small forward Senior [14][15]
1987–88 Smith, Charles D.Charles D. Smith Pittsburgh Power forward Senior [20][21]
1988–89 Smith, Charles E.Charles E. Smith Georgetown Guard Senior [14][15]
1989–90 Coleman, DerrickDerrick Coleman Syracuse Power forward Senior [18]
1990–91 Owens, BillyBilly Owens Syracuse Small forward/Shooting guard Junior [22]
1991–92 Mourning, AlonzoAlonzo Mourning Georgetown Center Senior [14][15]
1992–93 Dehere, TerryTerry Dehere Seton Hall Shooting guard Senior [17]
1993–94 Marshall, DonyellDonyell Marshall Connecticut Forward Junior [2]
1994–95 Kittles, KerryKerry Kittles Villanova Shooting guard Senior [23]
1995–96 Allen, RayRay Allen* Connecticut Shooting guard Junior [2]
1996–97 Garrity, PatPat Garrity Notre Dame Power forward Junior [24]
1997–98 Hamilton, RichardRichard Hamilton Connecticut Shooting guard/Small forward Sophomore [2]
1998–99 Hamilton, RichardRichard Hamilton (2) Connecticut Shooting guard/Small forward Junior [2]
1998–99 James, TimTim James Miami (FL) Small forward Senior [25]
1999–00 Murphy, TroyTroy Murphy Notre Dame Power forward Sophomore [24]
2000–01 Murphy, TroyTroy Murphy (2) Notre Dame Power forward Junior [24]
2000–01 Bell, TroyTroy Bell Boston College Guard Sophomore [26]
2001–02 Butler, CaronCaron Butler Connecticut Small forward Sophomore [2]
2001–02 Knight, BrandinBrandin Knight Pittsburgh Point guard Junior [20][27]
2002–03 Bell, TroyTroy Bell (2) Boston College Guard Senior [26]
2003–04 Okafor, EmekaEmeka Okafor Connecticut Center Junior [2]
2004–05 Warrick, HakimHakim Warrick Syracuse Power forward Senior [28]
2005–06 Foye, RandyRandy Foye Villanova Guard Senior [29]
2006–07 Green, JeffJeff Green Georgetown Forward Junior [14][30]
2007–08 Harangody, LukeLuke Harangody Notre Dame Power forward Sophomore [24][31]
2008–09 Blair, DeJuanDeJuan Blair Pittsburgh Center Sophomore [20]
2008–09 Thabeet, HasheemHasheem Thabeet Connecticut Center Junior [2]
2009–10 Johnson, WesleyWesley Johnson Syracuse Forward Junior [32]
2010–11 Hansbrough, BenBen Hansbrough Notre Dame Shooting guard Senior [33]
2011–12 Crowder, JaeJae Crowder Marquette Power forward Senior [34]
2012–13 Porter, OttoOtto Porter Georgetown Forward Sophomore [35]
2013–14 McDermott, DougDoug McDermott* Creighton Forward Senior [13]

Winners by school[edit]

School (year joined)[36] Winners Years
Georgetown (1979) 8 1980, 1984, 1985, 1987, 1989, 1992, 2007, 2013
Connecticut (1979)[a 1] 7 1994, 1996, 1998, 1999, 2002, 2004, 2009
Notre Dame (1995)[a 2] 5 1997, 2000, 2001, 2008, 2011
St. John's (1979) 4 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986
Syracuse (1979)[a 2] 4 1990, 1991, 2005, 2010
Boston College (1979)[a 3][37] 3 1981, 2001, 2003
Pittsburgh (1982)[a 2] 3 1988, 2002, 2009
Seton Hall (1979) 2 1982, 1993
Villanova (1980) 2 1995, 2006
Creighton (2013) 1 2014
Marquette (2005) 1 2012
Miami (1991)[a 4] 1 1999
Butler (2013) 0
Cincinnati (2005)[a 1] 0
DePaul (2005) 0
Louisville (2005)[a 1] 0
Providence (1979) 0
Rutgers (1995)[a 1] 0
South Florida (2005)[a 1] 0
Virginia Tech (2000)[a 5] 0
West Virginia (1995)[a 6] 0
Xavier (2013) 0

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Following the split of the original Big East in 2013, Cincinnati, Connecticut, Louisville, Rutgers, and South Florida remained in the football-sponsoring portion now known as the American Athletic Conference.
  2. ^ a b c Notre Dame, Pittsburgh, and Syracuse left for the ACC in 2013.
  3. ^ Boston College was a founding member in 1979, and left the Big East for the ACC in 2005.
  4. ^ Miami joined the conference in 1991 and left for the ACC in 2004.
  5. ^ Virginia Tech became an all-sports member of the Big East in 2000; it had joined for football in 1991. The Hokies left for the ACC in 2004.
  6. ^ West Virginia became an all-sports member of the Big East in 1995; it had also joined for football in 1991. The Mountaineers left for the Big 12 in 2012.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Irish forward among the best". Journal Gazette. February 28, 2009. Retrieved March 12, 2009. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h "Hasheem Thabeet Named 2008-09 Big East Co-Player of the Year". University of Connecticut. March 10, 2009. Archived from the original on 16 March 2009. Retrieved March 12, 2009. [dead link]
  3. ^ a b c d "St. John's Basketball All-Time Honors". St. John's Red Storm. Retrieved March 13, 2009. 
  4. ^ "Georgetown's Patrick Ewing Inducted into Basketball Hall of Fame". Georgetown University. September 6, 2008. Retrieved March 12, 2009. 
  5. ^ "Hall of Famers: Chris Mullin". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. Retrieved March 3, 2012. 
  6. ^ "Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame Announces Class of 2014" (Press release). Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. April 7, 2014. Retrieved April 7, 2014. 
  7. ^ Associated Press (March 10, 2009). "Blair, Thabeet named Big East co-player of the year". Sports Illustrated. Archived from the original on 14 March 2009. Retrieved March 12, 2009. 
  8. ^ "The Naismith Trophy History". Atlanta Tip Off Club. Archived from the original on 2 March 2009. Retrieved March 13, 2009. 
  9. ^ "John R. Wooden Award Winners". Los Angeles Athletic Club. Archived from the original on 13 April 2009. Retrieved March 13, 2009. 
  10. ^ "Men's College Basketball: Player of the Year Awards → United Press International". HickokSports.com. 2006. Retrieved April 12, 2010. 
  11. ^ "McDermott Named 2014 Naismith Men's College Player of the Year, presented by AT&T" (Press release). Atlanta Tipoff Club. April 6, 2014. Retrieved April 6, 2014. 
  12. ^ "Creighton’s McDermott Wins John R. Wooden Award Presented By Wendy’s" (Press release). Los Angeles Athletic Club. April 4, 2014. Retrieved April 4, 2014. 
  13. ^ a b "BIG EAST Announces Men's Basketball Player, Rookie, Coach of the Year" (Press release). Big East Conference. March 12, 2014. Retrieved March 12, 2014. 
  14. ^ a b c d e f g The Associated Press (March 6, 2007). "Georgetown's Green Big East player of the year". USA Today. Retrieved March 12, 2009. 
  15. ^ a b c d e f Georgetown Men's Basketball. Georgetown University. 2008–09. p. 141. Retrieved March 12, 2009. 
  16. ^ "Player Bio:John Bagley". Boston College Eagles. Retrieved March 12, 2009. 
  17. ^ a b Delozier, Alan (2002). Seton Hill Pirates: A Basketball History. Arcadia Publishing. p. 121. ISBN 0-7385-1079-3. 
  18. ^ a b c d Weiss, Dick (March 3, 1997). "The Best of the Big East". New York Daily News. Retrieved March 12, 2009. 
  19. ^ "Cast Of 50 Hardwood Legends Comprise The St. John's Basketball All-Century Team". St. John's University. May 29, 2008. Retrieved March 12, 2009. 
  20. ^ a b c Fittipaldo, Ray (March 11, 2009). "Blair, Thabeet share Big East player of the year award". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Archived from the original on 14 March 2009. Retrieved March 12, 2009. 
  21. ^ Elsberry, Chris (September 9, 2007). "Smith: Bridgeport's best from the 1980s". Bridgeport Public Schools. Retrieved March 16, 2009. 
  22. ^ "Billy Owens Bio". National Basketball Association. Archived from the original on 31 January 2009. Retrieved March 12, 2009. 
  23. ^ "Philadelphia Big 5, Year by Year: 1996-1997". University Archives and Records Center, University of Pennsylvania. Retrieved March 12, 2009. 
  24. ^ a b c d "Harangody and Brey Garner Big East Honors". University of Notre Dame. March 11, 2008. Retrieved March 12, 2009. 
  25. ^ "ACC Announces the 2008 Men's Basketball Tournament Legends". Atlantic Coast Conference. February 18, 2008. Retrieved March 12, 2009. 
  26. ^ a b Mazzone, Pete (March 17, 2003). "Bell Honored at Conference Award Ceremony in NYC". The Heights. Retrieved March 12, 2009. 
  27. ^ "Men's Basketball Hires Brandin Knight as Program Assistant/Video Coordinator". University of Pittsburgh. August 23, 2006. Archived from the original on 4 March 2009. Retrieved March 12, 2009. 
  28. ^ "2004–05 Syracuse Men's Basketball: Hakim Warrick" (pdf). Syracuse University. Retrieved March 12, 2009. 
  29. ^ "Player Bio: Randy Foye". Villanova University. Retrieved March 12, 2009. 
  30. ^ "Georgetown's Jeff Green Named Big East Conference Player of the Year". Big East Conference. March 7, 2007. Retrieved March 16, 2009. [dead link]
  31. ^ "Harangody Named Big East Player of the Year". Big East Conference. March 11, 2008. Retrieved March 16, 2009. [dead link]
  32. ^ "Syracuse's Wes Johnson Named BIG EAST Player of the Year" (Press release). Big East Conference. March 9, 2010. Retrieved March 9, 2010. [dead link]
  33. ^ "Notre Dame's Ben Hansbrough Named BIG EAST Player of the Year" (Press release). Big East Conference. March 8, 2011. Retrieved March 8, 2011. 
  34. ^ "Marquette's Crowder Named BIG EAST Player of the Year" (Press release). Big East Conference. March 6, 2012. Retrieved March 6, 2012. 
  35. ^ "Otto Porter Jr. Named Big East Player of the Year". Casual Hoya. March 12, 2013. Retrieved March 12, 2013. 
  36. ^ "The Big East Conference". Big East Conference. Archived from the original on 16 March 2009. Retrieved March 29, 2009. [dead link]
  37. ^ "About the ACC". Atlantic Coast Conference. Retrieved March 12, 2009.