Big Lottery Fund

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Big Lottery Fund
Type Non-departmental public body
Predecessor(s) Community Fund and New Opportunities Fund
Founded June 1, 2004 (2004-06-01)
Website www.biglotteryfund.org.uk

Big Lottery Fund (also known as BIG) is a non-departmental public body responsible for distributing funds raised by the National Lottery for "good causes". Since 2004 it has awarded over £4.4 billion to more than 130,000 projects across the UK.[citation needed]

BIG aims to support projects which help communities and the lives of people it considers most in need. Over 80 per cent of its funds go to voluntary and community organisations, but it also makes grants to statutory bodies, local authorities and social enterprises.

BIG makes grants to projects working in health, education and the environment and the charitable sector. It funds projects in line with objectives set by the government but does not fund services which other parts of government have a statutory responsibility to deliver.

"Additionality" principle[edit]

According to its Annual Report,[1] Big Lottery Fund uses the following definition of "additionality": "Lottery funding is distinct from Government funding and adds value. Although it does not substitute for Exchequer expenditure, where appropriate it complements Government and other programmes, policies and funding."

Income[edit]

The income of all the Lottery distributors[2] comes from the sale of National Lottery tickets. Of every £1 spent on a Lottery ticket 28 pence goes to the "good causes". The current operator of the National Lottery is Camelot.

BIG is the largest of the Lottery distributors, with an income of about £600 million a year. From April 2012 BIG will be responsible for distributing 40 per cent of funds raised for "good causes" (just over 10 pence of every £1 spent on a Lottery ticket).

Funding[edit]

BIG does not operate projects but allocates funds to organisations which operate projects. As part of the application process for funding, BIG requires funded organisations to outline the difference that should come about as a result of its funding.

BIG uses a variety of methods to distribute funding. Most of its grants go to voluntary and community organisations which apply within a range of funding programmes. However, in certain cases to meet a specific need, BIG will also seek applications from organisations with recognised expertise or make a substantial grant to a partner to award funds on its behalf.

Creation[edit]

BIG came into being on 1 June 2004, with the merger of two Lottery distributors – the National Lottery Charities Board (whose operating name was Community Fund) and the New Opportunities Fund. Big Lottery Fund was formally established by the National Lottery Act 2006. The Act gave the new body the extra responsibility of managing projects funded by the Millennium Commission.

Accountability[edit]

Although the Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) has overall responsibility for the National Lottery, BIG receives policy and financial directions from the Office for Civil Society (OCS) which is part of the Cabinet Office and the devolved governments of Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales.

Structure[edit]

The strategic direction of BIG is decided by a Board made up of a Chair and nine Board members. BIG's decision-making on grants is devolved to country committees for each of the four UK countries – England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. The chairs of these country committees sit on the main Board. Each of the four countries runs their own funding programmes, based on particular priorities and needs.

The Big Lottery Fund Chair is Peter Ainsworth.

The day-to-day running of BIG is under the responsibility of senior management team, made up of the Chief Executive and seven directors.

BIG's interim Chief Executive is Ceri Doyle, until Dawn Austwick takes over in Autumn 2013.

Funding programmes[edit]

A complete list of the programmes that BIG has funded can be found on the Big Lottery Fund website.[3]

Recent programmes include:

Forces in Mind[edit]

£35 million has been invested by the Big Lottery Fund on the Forces in Mind Trust (FIMT), a partnership of UK forces charities and mental health organisations, led by the Confederation of Service Charities (COBSEO). It has been given partnership support from the Foundation of Prince William and Prince Harry which will back the Trust with its own grants over a three-year programme as well as helping raise awareness of the issues facing veterans.[4] Over the next 20 years, FIMT will provide UK-wide long-term support and advocacy for Service personnel and Veterans to make a successful transition to civilian life.[5] The focus will be on addressing a range of problems that some ex-service personnel and their families can experience back in civilian life,[6] such as poor mental health,[7] family breakdown and alcohol-related problems.

Supporting Change and Impact[edit]

Supporting Change and Impact is an initiative helping existing BIG grant holders, helping them to plan future service delivery in a challenging funding environment.[8]

Silver Dreams Fund[edit]

The Silver Dreams Fund is a programme run in association with the Daily Mail.[9] The fund is posing a challenge to the voluntary and community sector to come up with great ideas for projects that will pioneer ways to help vulnerable older people deal more effectively with life-changing events.

Heroes Return2[edit]

Heroes Return2 funds veterans, their families, spouses and carers to visit the places where they saw action in the Second World War or to take part in commemorative events in the UK.[10][11]

Improving Futures[edit]

The Improving Futures programmes helps children from families who have complex and multiple needs.[12][13][14][15][16]

Big Fund[edit]

BIG Fund logo.png

The National Lottery Act 2006 gave BIG the powers to handle non-Lottery as well as Lottery funding.

BIG has managed non-Lottery programmes on behalf of OCS, the Department for Education and the Welsh Assembly Government.

BIG's non-Lottery funding is branded distinctly and promoted independently from Lottery funding.

References[edit]