Bill Mallory

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For the player born 1901, see Bill Mallory (American football).
Bill Mallory
Sport(s) Football
Biographical details
Born (1935-05-20) May 20, 1935 (age 79)
Playing career
1955–1956 Miami (OH)
Position(s) End
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1966–1968
1969–1973
1974–1978
1980–1983
1984–1996
Ohio State (assistant)
Miami (OH)
Colorado
Northern Illinois
Indiana
Head coaching record
Overall 168–129–4
Bowls 4–6
Statistics
College Football Data Warehouse
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
2 MAC (1973, 1983)
1 Big Eight (1976)
Awards
2x MAC Coach of the Year (1973, 1983)
2x Big Ten Coach of the Year (1986–1987)

William G. "Bill" Mallory (born May 20, 1935) is a former American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at Miami University (1969–1973), the University of Colorado at Boulder (1974–1978), Northern Illinois University (1980–1983), and Indiana University (1984–1996), compiling a career college football record of 168–129–4.

Playing career[edit]

Mallory played football at Miami University for coaches Ara Parseghian and John Pont.

Coaching career[edit]

Mallory is the Indiana Hoosiers' winningest football coach, having compiled a 69–77–3 record. Before taking over the head coaching reins at Indiana in 1984, Mallory coached three other schools to national prominence. While compiling a 168–129–4 career record, Mallory became one of only a handful of coaches in history to guide three different programs to top 20 finishes in national polls. In 1987, Mallory became the first coach to be awarded back-to-back Big Ten coach-of-the-year honors. While at Indiana, Mallory led the Hoosiers to six bowl games including victories in the 1988 Liberty Bowl, and the 1991 Copper Bowl. He also led IU to a top 20 ranking in 1987 and 1988.

Early in his coaching career, Mallory served as assistant to Woody Hayes at Ohio State, Carm Cozza at Yale and Doyt Perry at Bowling Green.

Mallory is a member of Miami University's Cradle of Coaches. He is also a member of the Athletic Halls of Fame at Miami University and Indiana University, the Mid-American Conference,[1] the Indiana Football Hall of Fame and the Phi Kappa Tau Hall of Fame.

Mallory was the 15th head college football coach for the Northern Illinois University Huskies located in DeKalb, Illinois and he held that position for four seasons, from 1980 until 1983. His career coaching record at Northern Illinois was 25 wins, 19 losses, and 0 ties. This ranks him sixth at Northern Illinois in total wins and seventh at Northern Illinois in winning percentage.[2]

Head coaching record[edit]

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs Coaches# AP°
Miami Redskins (Mid-American Conference) (1969–1973)
1969 Miami 7–3 3–3 T–3rd
1970 Miami 7–3 3–2 T–2nd
1971 Miami 7–3 2–3 T–3rd
1972 Miami 7–3 2–3 T–4th
1973 Miami 11–0 5–0 1st W Tangerine 17 15
Miami: 39–12 15–11
Colorado Buffaloes (Big Eight Conference) (1974–1978)
1974 Colorado 5–6 3–4 5th
1975 Colorado 9–3 5–2 3rd L Bluebonnet 16
1976 Colorado 8–4 5–2 T–1st L Orange 16 16
1977 Colorado 7–3–1 3–3–1 4th
1978 Colorado 6–5 2–5 7th
Colorado: 35–21–1 18–16–1
Northern Illinois Huskies (Mid-American Conference) (1980–1983)
1980 Northern Illinois 7–4 4–3 T–3rd
1981 Northern Illinois 3–8 2–7 9th
1982 Northern Illinois 5–5 5–4 T–5th
1983 Northern Illinois 10–2 8–1 1st W California
Northern Illinois: 25–19 19–15
Indiana Hoosiers (Big Ten Conference) (1984–1996)
1984 Indiana 0–11 0–9 10th
1985 Indiana 4–7 1–7 T–9th
1986 Indiana 6–6 3–5 T–6th L All-American
1987 Indiana 8–4 6–2 T–2nd L Peach 20
1988 Indiana 8–3–1 5–3 5th W Liberty 19 20
1989 Indiana 5–6 3–5 T–6th
1990 Indiana 6–5–1 3–4–1 7th L Peach
1991 Indiana 7–4–1 5–3 T–3rd W Copper
1992 Indiana 5–6 3–5 T–6th
1993 Indiana 8–4 5–3 T–4th L Independence
1994 Indiana 7–4 3–5 T–6th
1995 Indiana 2–9 0–8 11th
1996 Indiana 3–8 1–7 T–9th
Indiana: 69–77–3 39–65–1
Total: 168–129–4
      National championship         Conference title         Conference division title
#Rankings from final Coaches' Poll.
°Rankings from final AP Poll.

References[edit]

External links[edit]