Biodiversity of Cape Town

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Cape Town's original vegetation types
Cape Town's surviving vegetation types

Floristic region (phytochorion)[edit]

The city of Cape Town lies within the Cape Floristic Kingdom (by far the smallest and most diverse of the earth’s 6 floristic kingdoms).[1]

Vegetation types[edit]

Cape Town is located within a CI Biodiversity hotspot and is home to a total of 19 different and distinct vegetation types. (This enormous variety is mainly because the city is uniquely located at the convergence point of a great many different soil types and micro-climates.) These 19 vegetation types are mostly restricted to unusually small areas, and several are completely endemic to the city – occurring nowhere else in the world. Vegetation types include the following.[2][3]

Endemism[edit]

Of the thousands of plant species that are indigenous to Cape Town, 190 are known to be endemic to the city - occurring nowhere else in the world. In addition, there are over a hundred animal species that are also restricted to the city.[4] Endemic plant species include the following.[5][6][7][8][9]

Cape Peninsula endemics
Additional species

Species records in South African Biodiversity Database[edit]

Mammals[edit]

Mammals present in Cape Town, as of 2011, including the following.[10][clarification needed][11][clarification needed]

Fish[edit]

Fish present in Cape Town, as of 2011, including the following.[10][11]

Reptiles[edit]

Reptiles present in Cape Town, as of 2011, including the following.[10][11]

Amphibians[edit]

Amphibians present in Cape Town, as of 2011, including the following.[10][11]

Insects[edit]

Insects present in Cape Town, as of 2011, including the following.[10][11]

Fungi[edit]

Fungi present in Cape Town, as of 2011, including the following.[10][11]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Environmental Resource Management in the city of Cape Town". 
  2. ^ http://www.capetown.gov.za/en/stats/Documents/Vegetation%20Types.mht
  3. ^ http://www.capetown.gov.za/en/stats/Pages/VegetationTypes.aspx
  4. ^ "Endemic Species of the city of Cape Town". 
  5. ^ http://www.capetown.gov.za/en/EnvironmentalResourceManagement/publications/Pages/BrochuresBooklets.aspx
  6. ^ http://www.capetown.gov.za/en/EnvironmentalResourceManagement/publications/Documents/Biodiv_fact_sheet_suppl_Endemic_spp_list_2010-03.pdf
  7. ^ A.B. Low & A.G. Rebelo (eds). Vegetation of South Africa, Lesotho & Swaziland, a companion to the vegetation map of South Africa, Lesotho and Swaziland. Dept Environmental Affairs and Tourism, Pretoria. 85pp. ISBN 0-621-17316-9.
  8. ^ A.G. Rebelo, C. Boucher, N. Helme, L. Mucina, M.C. Rutherford et al. 2006. Fynbos Biome, in: L. Mucina & M.C. Rutherford (eds). The Vegetation of South Africa, Lesotho and Swaziland. Strelitzia 19, pp 52‐219.
  9. ^ Anthony G. Rebelo, Patricia M. Holmes, Clifford Dorse & Julia Wood. Cape Town: Averting a Biodiversity Megadisaster? Unpublished MS.
  10. ^ a b c d e f http://www.biodiversity.co.za/
  11. ^ a b c d e f Updated from South African Biodiversity Database (http://www.biodiversity.co.za/) as species present in Cape Town on 2011/01/06