Birmingham Friends Meetinghouse

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Birmingham Friends Meetinghouse and School
Birmingham Friends Meeting.jpg
Birmingham Friends Meetinghouse is located in Pennsylvania
Birmingham Friends Meetinghouse
Location 1245 Birmingham Rd., Birmingham Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania
Coordinates 39°54′20″N 75°35′42″W / 39.90556°N 75.59500°W / 39.90556; -75.59500Coordinates: 39°54′20″N 75°35′42″W / 39.90556°N 75.59500°W / 39.90556; -75.59500
Area 2.4 acres (0.97 ha)
Built 1763
Governing body Private
NRHP Reference # 71000688[1]
Significant dates
Added to NRHP July 27, 1971
Designated PHMC September 1915[2]

Birmingham Friends Meetinghouse is a historic Quaker meeting house at 1245 Birmingham Road in Birmingham Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania. The current meetinghouse was built in 1763 and added to the National Register in 1971. The building and the adjacent cemetery were near the center of fighting on the afternoon of September 11, 1777 at the Battle of Brandywine. Worship services are held weekly at 10am.[3][4] The meetinghouse and an adjacent octagonal schoolhouse are listed on the National Register of Historic Places as Birmingham Friends Meetinghouse and School.

History[edit]

The first Quaker meeting in Birmingham Township was held about 1690. In 1718 a meetinghouse was built from red cedar logs. A burial ground, surrounded by a stone wall, was established in the 1750s. The current building was built of stone in 1763 and measured 38 by 41 feet. During the Battle of Brandywine, the British forces attempted to flank the Continental forces under General George Washington. The Continental forces rushed north to meet the British in the area of the meetinghouse. It was used as a hospital first for the Americans, and after the battle for British officers. The stone wall around the cemetery was used as a defensive position by the Americans. After the battle, dead British and American soldiers shared a common grave in the cemetery.

The meetinghouse was enlarged in 1819 and an octagonal school was completed in August, 1819 at a cost of $712.57. The school was used off and on through 1905 and is included in the NRHP site. In 1968 Quaker architect Mather Lippincott designed a new education building to the north of the meeting house.[3][5]

The school is now used as The Peace Center at Birmingham.[6]

From 1845 to 1923 a group of Quakers worshipped a few hundred yards south at the Orthodox Meetinghouse as a result of the Hicksite-Orthodox split. That meetinghouse is listed separately on the NRHP.[7]

References[edit]

The octagonal school next to the meetinghouse
  1. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2009-03-13. 
  2. ^ "PHMC Historical Markers". Historical Marker Database. Pennsylvania Historical & Museum Commission. Retrieved December 20, 2013. 
  3. ^ a b "National Historic Landmarks & National Register of Historic Places in Pennsylvania" (Searchable database). CRGIS: Cultural Resources Geographic Information System.  Note: This includes Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission (December 1970). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form: Birmingham Friends Meetinghouse and School" (PDF). Retrieved 2012-10-30. 
  4. ^ Birmingham Monthly Meeting, accessed February 3, 2011.
  5. ^ Birmingham Friends History, accessed February 2, 2011.
  6. ^ Birmingham Monthly Meeting - about us, accessed February 2, 2011.
  7. ^ "National Historic Landmarks & National Register of Historic Places in Pennsylvania" (Searchable database). CRGIS: Cultural Resources Geographic Information System.  Note: This includes Elanor Webster (1971). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form: Orthodox Meetinghouse" (PDF). Retrieved 2012-10-30. 

External links[edit]