Birmingham Hodge Hill by-election, 2004

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Hodge Hill constituency shown within Birmingham

A by-election was held for the United Kingdom Parliament seat of Birmingham Hodge Hill, on 15 July, the same day as the Leicester South by-election. The by-election was called following the resignation of the sitting MP, Terry Davis, on 22 June 2004.[1] Davis had been appointed as Secretary General of the Council of Europe

The area has had a Labour MP since the 1950 general election, the only break being a Conservative Party victory at a 1977 by-election for the Birmingham Stechford constituency. Stechford returned to Labour at the 1979 general election.

At the by-election, the seat was won by the Labour Party candidate Liam Byrne with 7,451 votes and a vastly reduced majority. The Liberal Democrat candidate Nicola Davies increased her party's share of the vote by over 26% and was only 460 votes behind.

The by-election was heavily contested by Labour and the Liberal Democrats, with both parties alleging "dirty tricks" by the other.[2]


Results[edit]

Turnout was 37.89%.

2004 by-election: Birmingham Hodge Hill
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Labour Liam Byrne 7,451 36.5 -27.4
Liberal Democrat Nicola Davies 6,991 34.2 +26.1
Conservative Stephen Eyre 3,543 17.3 -2.7
Respect John Rees 1,282 6.3
National Front Jim Starkey 805 3.9
English Democrats Mark Wheatley 277 1.4
Christian Vote Rev. George Hargreaves 90 0.4
Majority 460
Turnout 20,439 37.9
Labour hold Swing

2001 result[edit]

From the 2001 general election.

2001 General Election: Birmingham, Hodge Hill
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Labour Terry Davis 16,901 63.9 -1.7
Conservative Debbie Lewis 5,283 20.0 -4.0
Liberal Democrat Charles Dow 2,147 8.1 -0.4
BNP Lee Windridge 889 3.3
People's Justice Perwaz Hussain 561 2.1
Socialist Labour Dennis Cridge 284 1.1
UKIP Harvey Vivian 275 1.0 -0.9
Muslim Party Ayub Khan 125 0.5
Majority 11,618 43.9
Turnout 26,465 47.9

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1] Sessional Information Digest 2003-04, Hansard
  2. ^ Nick Cohen (22 August 2004). "The Ghost of Enoch". The Observer. Retrieved 16 December 2010. 

External links[edit]