Roman Catholic Diocese of Beauvais

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Diocese of Beauvais, Noyon and Senlis
Dioecesis Bellovacensis, Noviomensis et Silvanectensis
Diocèse de Beauvais - Noyon - Senlis
Picardie Beauvais2 tango7174.jpg
Location
Country France
Territory Oise
Ecclesiastical province Reims
Metropolitan Archdiocese of Reims
Statistics
Area 5,855 km2 (2,261 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics
(as of 2012)
804,100
714,000 (88.8%)
Parishes 45
Information
Denomination Roman Catholic
Rite Latin Rite
Established 3rd century
Cathedral St. Peter's Cathedral, Beauvais
Patron saint St. Lucian of Beauvais
Current leadership
Pope Francis
Bishop Jacques Benoit-Gonnin, Comm. l'Emm.
Metropolitan Archbishop Thierry Jordan
Map
Oise-Position.svg
Website
oise.catholique.fr
Harvey and Roger, two bishops of Beauvais in the Middle Ages, panel from the binding of a pontifical in the cathedral of Beauvais

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Beauvais (Lat:Diocesis Bellovacensis) is a diocese of the Latin Rite of the Roman Catholic Church in France. The diocese encompasses the department of Oise in the Region of Picardie. The diocese is a suffragan of the Archdiocese of Reims. The current bishop is Jacques Benoit-Gonnin, appointed in 2010.

History[edit]

The diocese of Beauvais was traditionally founded by St. Lucian (Lucianus, Lucien) in the 3rd century. After 1013 the Bishops were simultaneously Counts of Beauvais, and one of the Peers of France. The Bishop had a role in the coronation ceremony of the French king, and played a role in politics; Roger II died during the First Crusade, Philip of Dreux was a participant in the Third Crusade and the Battle of Bouvines, and Pierre Cauchon was involved in the trial of Joan of Arc.

The diocese was abolished during the French Revolution, and was recreated as part of the Diocese of Amiens in 1802. Beauvais was re-established in 1822, and the Diocese of Beauvais-NoyonSenlis was created in 1851, comprising the territories of all three formerly separate dioceses. Beauvais Cathedral serves as the seat of the new diocese, which has a population of 766,441, 90% of whom are Roman Catholic.

Bishops of Beauvais[edit]

To 1000[edit]

  • St. Lucianus (3rd century)
  • Thalasius
  • Victor
  • Chanarus
  • Numitius
  • Licerius
  • Themerus
  • Bertegesillus
  • Rodomarus
  • Ansoldus
  • Ribertus
  • Cogerimus
  • Anselmus
  • Maurinus
  • Himbertus
  • Clement
  • Constantinus
  • Radingus (632-660)
  • Ercambertus
  • Rocoaldus
  • Miroldus
  • Austringus
  • Deodatus
  • Andreas
  • Hodingus
  • Adalmanus
  • Ragimbertus
  • Hildemanus
  • Erminfridus (?-859)
  • Odo I (860-881)
  • Hrotgarius (881-888)
  • Honoratus (888-890)
  • Herluin (909-921)
  • Bovon
  • Hildegar
  • Walleran (933-972)
  • Harvey (987-997)
  • Hugh (997-1002)

From 1000[edit]

  • Roger of Blois (1002–1022) (first Count of Beauvais)
  • Garin (1022–1030)
  • Drogo (1035–1058)
  • Guibert (1059–1063)
  • Guy (1063–1085)
  • Ursion (1085–1089)
  • Fulk of Dammartin (1089–1095)
  • Roger II (1095–1096)
  • Ansel (1096–1099)
  • Galon (1099-1104)
  • Godfrey of Pisseleu (1104-1114)
  • Peter of Dammartin (1114–1133)
  • Odo II (1133–1144)
  • Odo III (1144–1148)
  • Henry (1149–1162) (son of Louis VI of France, later Archbishop of Reims)
  • Bartholomew of Montcornet (1162–1175)
  • Philip of Dreux (1175–1217) (son of Robert I of Dreux, and thus nephew of Henry (above))
  • Milo of Nanteuil (1217–1234)
  • Godfrey of Clermont (1234–1236)
  • Robert of Cressonsacq (1237–1248)
  • William of Gres (1249–1267)
  • Reginald of Nanteuil (1267–1283)
  • Theobald of Nanteuil (1283–1300)
  • Simon II of Clermont-Nesle (1301–1312/13), son of Simon II of Clermont, Seigneur of Nesle
  • Jean de Marigny (1313–1347)
  • William Bertran (1347–1356)
  • Philip of Alençon (1356–1360) (son of Charles II of Alençon)
  • John of Dormans (1360–1368)
  • John of Augerant (1368–1375)
  • Milo of Dormans (1375–1387)
  • William of Vienne (1387–1388)
  • Thomas of Estouteville (1388–1395)
  • Thomas of Orléans (1395–1397)
  • Peter of Savoisy (1398–1412)
  • Bernard of Chevenon (1413–1420)
  • Pierre Cauchon (1420–1432)
  • Jean Juvenal des Ursins (1433–1444)
  • Guillaume d’Hellande (1444–1462)
  • Jean de Bar (1462–1488)
  • Louis de Villiers (1497–1521)
  • Antoine Lascaris de Tende (1523–1530)
  • Charles de Villiers (1530–1535)
  • Odet de Coligny de Châtillon (1535–1569)
  • Charles de Bourbon (1569–1575)
  • Nicolas Fumée (1575–1593)
  • Arthur de Campbells(1595)
  • René Potier (1596–1616)
  • Augustin Potier (1617–1650)
  • Nicolas Choart de Buzenval (1651–1679)
  • Toussaint de Forbin-Janson (1679–1713)
  • François-Honoré Antoine de Saint-Aignan (1713–1728)
  • René Potier de Gesvres (1728–1772)
  • François-Joseph de la Rochefoucauld (1772–1792)

Bishops of Amiens[edit]

  • Jean-Chrisostôme de Villaret (1802–1805)
  • Jean-François de Mandolx (1805–1817)
  • Marc-Marie de Bombelles (1819–1822)
  • Jean-Pierre de Gallien de Chabons (1822–1823)

Bishops of Beauvais (restored)[edit]

Bishops of Beauvais-Noyon-Senlis[edit]

  • Joseph-Armand Gignoux (1842–1878)
  • François Edouard Hasley (1878–1880)
  • Désiré-Joseph Dennel (1880–1884)
  • Joseph-Maxence Peronne (1884–1892)
  • Edmond Frédéric Fuzet (1892–1900)
  • Marie Jean Célestin Douais (1900–1915)
  • Eugène-Stanislas Le Senne (1915–1937)
  • Félix Roeder (1937–1955)
  • Pierre-Mararie Lacointe (1955–1965)
  • Stéphane Émile Alfred Desmazières (1965–1978)
  • Jacques André Marie Jullien (1978–1984)
  • Adolphe-Maria Gustave Hardy (1985–1995)
  • Guy Marie Alexandre Thomazeau (1995–2002)
  • Jean-Paul André Denis Marcel James (2003–2009)
  • Jacques Benoit-Gonnin (2010–present)

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 49°25′55″N 2°04′52″E / 49.432°N 2.08118°E / 49.432; 2.08118