Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Bologna

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Archdiocese of Bologna
Archidioecesis Bononiensis
Arcidiocesi di Bologna
Bologna-San Pietro visto dalla Torre degli Asinelli.jpg
Aerial view of Bologna Cathedral.
Location
Country Italy
Statistics
Area 3,549 km2 (1,370 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics
(as of 2006)
964,733
936,093 (97.0%)
Parishes 414 (14 deaneries)
Information
Rite Latin Rite
Established Diocese in 3rd century,
Archdiocese in 1582
Cathedral Bologna Cathedral
Patron saint Saint Petronius
Secular priests 431
Current leadership
Pope Francis
Metropolitan Archbishop Cardinal Carlo Caffarra
Vicar General
  • Giovanni Silvagni (vicar general)
  • Gabriele Cavina (pro-vicar general)
Emeritus Bishops
  • Cardinal Giacomo Biffi (Archbishop Emeritus)
  • Ernesto Vecchi (Auxiliary Bishop Emeritus)
Website
www.bologna.chiesacattolica.it
Saint Petronius, bishop 431 – 450
Blessed Niccolò Albergati, bishop 1417 – 1443.
Cardinal Giuliano della Rovere, then Pope Julius II, archbishop 1483 – 1499.
Cardinal Gabriele Paleotti, first archbishop, 1582 – 1597.
Cardinal Scipione Borghese, archbishop 1610 – 1612.
Cardinal Prospero Lambertini, then Pope Benedict XIV, archbishop 1731 – 1754.
Cardinal Andrea Gioannetti, archbishop 1775 – 1800.
Cardinal Giacomo della Chiesa, then Pope Benedict XV, archbishop 1907 – 1914.

The Archdiocese of Bologna is a Roman Catholic archbishopric in northern Italy, with the archiepiscopal seat in Bologna Cathedral. The current Archbishop is Cardinal Carlo Caffarra since 2003.[1]

The archdiocese has the following suffragans:

History[edit]

The bishopric of Bologna was founded in the 3rd century and raised to the level of an archbishopric on 10 December 1582.

Nine of the early bishops have been canonized, and three other bishops and three archbishops have been elected to the Papacy as Pope Innocent VII (1404), Pope Nicholas V (1447), Pope Julius II (1503), Pope Gregory XV (1621), Pope Benedict XIV (1740) and Pope Benedict XV (1914).

List of bishops and archbishops[edit]

The following is a list of the bishops and archbishops of Bologna from 313 to the present day.[1][2][3][4][5][6][7]

Bishops[edit]

  • Saint Zama (313)
  • Saint Faustino (or Faustiniano) (342)
  • Domiziano (?)
  • Saint Teodoro I (?)
  • Gioviano
  • Saint Eusebio (370 ?)
  • Eustasio (390?)
  • Saint Felice (397 – died 431)
  • Saint Petronius (431 – 450)
  • Marcello
  • Saint Parteniano
  • Giuliano I
  • Geronzio
  • Lussorio (?)
  • Saint Tertulliano (?)
  • Saint Giocondo (496)
  • Teodoro II (?)
  • Clemente (?)
  • Pietro I (?)
  • Germano (?)
  • Costantino (?)
  • Giuliano II (?)
  • Adeodato (?)
  • Giustiniano (?)
  • Luminoso (649)
  • Donno (?)
  • Vittore I (680)
  • Eliseo (?)
  • Gaudenzio (?)
  • Causino (?)
  • Barbato (736 – after 744)
  • Romano (752 – after 756)
  • Pietro II (786)
  • Vitale (801)
  • Martino I (?)
  • Teodoro III (after 814 – 825)
  • Cristoforo (827)
  • Martino II (?)
  • Pietro III (?)
  • Orso (?)
  • Giovanni I (880 – 881)
  • Severo (884 – after 898)
  • Pietro IV (? – died 905)
  • Giovanni II (?)
  • Alberto (after 955 – 983)
  • Giovanni III (before 997 – 1007)
  • Frogerio (after 1019 – Resigned 1028)
  • Alfredo (after 1031 – 1055)
  • Lamberto (after 1062 – after 1074)
  • Gerardo I (1079 – 1089)
  • Bernardo (1096 – died 15 April 1104)
  • Vittore II (1108 – died 1129)
  • Enrico I (1130 – died July 1145)
  • Gerardo Grassi (1148 – died 8 August 1165)
  • Giovanni IV (1169 – died 15 January 1187)
  • Gerardo di Gisla (1187 – died 1198)
  • Gerardo Ariosti (1198 – resigned 1213)
  • Enrico della Fratta (1213 – resigned 1240)
  • Giacomo Boncambi, O.P. (31 May 1244 – died October 1260)
  • Ottaviano II degli Ubaldini (1261 – died 14 September 1295)
  • Schiatta degli Ubaldini (1295 – died 1298)
  • Giovanni Savelli, O.P. (1299 – died 1301)
  • Uberto Avvocati (19 September 1301 – June 1322)
  • Arnaldo Sabatier di Cahors (1322 – translated to Riez on 1 October 1330)
  • Stefano Agonet (1331 – died 1332)
  • Bertrando de Fumel (5 June 1332 – 1339)
  • Beltramino Parravicini (5 September 1340 – died 1350)
  • Giovanni di Naso, O.P. (13 October 1350 – died 3 August 1361)
  • Almerico Cathy (18 August 1361 – translated to Limoges on 18 July 1371)
  • Bernardo de Bonnevalle (18 July 1371 – deposed 1378)
  • Cosimo de' Migliorati (19 June 1389 – resigned 1390, later elected Pope Innocent VII)
  • Rolando da Imola, O.P. (1390)
  • Bartolomeo Raimondi, O.S.B. (21 August 1392 – died 16 June 1406)
  • Antonio Correr, C.R.S.G.A. (31 March 1407 – resigned 2 November 1412)[8]
  • Giovanni di Michele, O.S.B. (1412 – died 5 January 1417)
  • Blessed Niccolò Albergati, O.Cart. (4 January 1417 – died 9 May 1443)
  • Nicolò Zanolini, C.R.L. (bishop-elect: 1444 – died 18 May 1444)
  • Tomaso Parentucelli (27 November 1444 – elected Pope Nicholas V on 6 March 1447)
  • Giovanni del Poggio (22 March 1447 – died 15 December 1447)
  • Filippo Calandrini (18 December 1447 – died 18 July 1476)
    • Francesco Gonzaga (apostolic administrator: 26 July 1476 – died 21 October 1483)
  • Cardinal Giuliano della Rovere (3 November 1483 – 20 September 1499, later elected Pope Julius II)
  • Giovanni Stefano Ferreri (24 January 1502 – 5 October 1510)
    • Cardinal Francesco Adiosi (apostolic administrator: 18 October 1510 – 24 May 1511)
  • Cardinal Achille Grassi (24 May 1511 – 22 November 1523)
  • Cardinal Lorenzo Campeggio (2 December 1523 – 1525)
    • Cardinal Andrea della Valle (apostolic administrator: 20 December 1525 – 19 March 1526)
  • Cardinal Alessandro Campeggio (1526 – 6 March 1553)
  • Giovanni Campeggio (6 March 1553 – 7 September 1563)
    • Cardinal Rannucio Farnese (apostolic administrator: 17 July 1564 – 28 October 1565)

Archbishops[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Archdiocese of Bologna". Catholic Hierarchy. Retrieved 2009-10-28. 
  2. ^ Miranda, Salvador. "Consistories for the creation of Cardinals in the 16th Century (1503-1605)". The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church. Retrieved 2009-10-28. 
  3. ^ Miranda, Salvador. "Consistories for the creation of Cardinals in the 17th Century (1605-1700)". The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church. Retrieved 2009-10-28. 
  4. ^ Miranda, Salvador. "Consistories for the creation of Cardinals in the 18th Century (1700-1799)". The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church. Retrieved 2009-10-28. 
  5. ^ Miranda, Salvador. "Consistories for the creation of Cardinals in the 19th Century (1800-1903)". The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church. Retrieved 2009-10-28. 
  6. ^ Miranda, Salvador. "Consistories for the creation of Cardinals in the 20th Century (1903-2005)". The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church. Retrieved 2009-10-28. 
  7. ^ Miranda, Salvador. "Consistories for the creation of Cardinals in the 21st Century (since 2005)". The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church. Retrieved 2009-10-28. 
  8. ^ King, H. P. F. (1962). "Archdeacons of Lincoln". Fasti Ecclesiae Anglicanae 1300–1541: Volume 1: Lincoln Diocese. British History Online. pp. 6–8. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 44°29′45″N 11°20′36″E / 44.4958°N 11.3433°E / 44.4958; 11.3433