Roman Catholic Diocese of Iesi

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Diocese of Iesi
Dioecesis Aesinus
Jesi-SanSettimio.jpg
Cathedral in Iesi
Location
Country Italy
Ecclesiastical province Ancona-Osimo
Statistics
Area 315 km2 (122 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics
(as of 2006)
76,000
73,650 (96.9%)
Parishes 41
Information
Denomination Catholic Church
Rite Roman Rite
Established 6th Century
Cathedral Basilica Cattedrale di S. Settimio
Current leadership
Pope Francis
Bishop Gerardo Rocconi
Map
Diocesi di Fabriano-Matelica.svg
Website
www2.chiesacattolica.it

The diocese of Iesi (Latin: Dioecesis Aesinus) is a Catholic ecclesiastical territory in the Marche, Italy. It is a suffragan of the archdiocese of Ancona-Osimo.[1]

History[edit]

Saint Septimius, martyred in 307, is venerated as the first bishop of Jesi. Saint Florianus, who was cast into the Esino in the Diocletian persecution, is also venerated (perhaps he is confounded with Saint Florianus who was cast into the Enus or Anisus). Other bishops of antiquity were Martianus (c. 500), Calumniosus (c. 647), Honestus. The relics of these three were discovered in 1623.

In 1245 Pope Innocent IV deposed the intruder Armannus and placed in his stead the Franciscan Gualtiero, an Englishman and a friend of John of Parma, general of the order and patron of the Franciscan Spirituals, spoken of by Salimbene as "bonus cantor, bonus praedicator, bonus dictator". Bishop Severinus in 1237 laid the foundations of the new cathedral, a magnificent structure; the old one, now San Nicola, was outside the city, and in the eighteenth century had fallen into ruin.

Gabriele del Monte (1554) introduced the reforms of the Council of Trent, which he had attended. His successors were Cardinal Camillo Borghese (1597), afterwards Pope Paul V; Cardinals Tiberio Cenci (1621) and Alderano Cybo (1656), noted for their benefactions; Antonio Fonseca (1724), who restored the cathedral and founded a hospital. Cardinal Caprara, afterwards Archbishop of Milan, who concluded the Concordat with Napoleon, was Bishop of Jesi (1800-02). He was succeeded by Antonio M. Odescalchi, deported to Milan by the French in 1809.[2]

Ordinaries since 1540[edit]

  • Benedetto Conversini † (10 Jun 1540 - 1553 Died)
  • Gabriele Del Monte † (10 Nov 1554 - 27 Apr 1597 Died)
  • Camillo Borghese † (14 Apr 1597 - 2 Aug 1599 Resigned)
  • Marco Agrippa Dandini † (2 Aug 1599 - 20 Oct 1603 Died)
  • Pirro Imperoli † (28 Jan 1604 - 1609 Died)
  • Marcello Pignatelli, C.R. † (13 Nov 1617 - 1621 Died)
  • Tiberio Cenci † (24 Nov 1621 - 26 Feb 1653 Died)
  • Giacomo Corradi † (21 Apr 1653 - Apr 1656 Resigned)
  • Alderano Cibo † (24 Apr 1656 - 10 Dec 1671 Resigned)
  • Lorenzo Cibo (Cybo) † (18 Jan 1671 - 17 Aug 1680 Died)
  • Pier Matteo Petrucci, C.O. † (14 Apr 1681 - 21 Jan 1691 Resigned)
  • Alessandro Fedeli † (20 Feb 1696 - 7 Apr 1715 Died)
  • Francesco Antonio Giattini † (7 Dec 1716 - 27 Sep 1724 Resigned)
  • Antonio Fonseca † (20 Dec 1724 - 9 Dec 1763 Died)
  • Ubaldo Baldassini, B. † (9 Apr 1764 - 1786 Died)
  • Giovanni Battista Bussi de Pretis † (21 Feb 1794 - 27 Jun 1800 Died)
  • Giovanni Battista Caprara Montecuccoli † (11 Aug 1800 - 24 May 1802 Appointed, Archbishop of Milan)
  • Antonio Maria Odescalchi † (28 May 1804 - 23 Jul 1812 Died)
  • Francesco Cesarei Leoni † (28 Jul 1817 - 25 Jul 1830 Died)
  • Francesco Tiberi Contigliano † (2 Jul 1832 - 18 May 1836 Resigned)
  • Pietro Ostini † (11 Jul 1836 - 19 Dec 1841 Resigned)
  • Silvestro Belli † (24 Jan 1842 - 9 Sep 1844 Died)
  • Cosimo Corsi † (20 Jan 1845 - 19 Dec 1853 Appointed, Archbishop of Pisa)
  • Carlo Luigi Morichini † (23 Jun 1854 - 24 Nov 1871 Appointed, Archbishop of Bologna)
  • Rambaldo Magagnini † (6 May 1872 - 23 Dec 1892 Died)
  • Aurelio Zonghi † (12 Jun 1893 - 9 Jan 1902 Resigned)
  • Giovanni Battista Ricci † (9 Jun 1902 - 21 Jul 1906 Appointed, Archbishop of Ancona e Numana)
  • Giuseppe Gandolfi † (1 Dec 1906 - 14 Sep 1927 Died)
  • Goffredo Zaccherini † (15 Jun 1928 - 11 May 1934 Resigned)
  • Carlo Falcinelli † (6 Sep 1934 - 6 Nov 1952 Resigned)
  • Giovanni Battista Pardini † (7 Jan 1953 - 30 Apr 1975 Resigned)
  • Oscar Serfilippi, O.F.M. Conv. † (1 Mar 1978 - 20 Mar 2006 Retired)
  • Gerardo Rocconi (20 Mar 2006 - present)

Notes[edit]

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainHerbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). Catholic Encyclopedia. Robert Appleton Company.