Bishopstone railway station

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Bishopstone National Rail
Bishopstone
Location
Place Seaford
Local authority Lewes
Grid reference TV469998
Operations
Station code BIP
Managed by Southern
Number of platforms 1
Live arrivals/departures and station information
from National Rail Enquiries
Annual rail passenger usage*
2002/03      19,282
2004/05 Decrease 17,128
2005/06 Increase 18,099
2006/07 Increase 24,041
2007/08 Increase 27,542
2008/09 Increase 28,836
2009/10 Increase 29,632
2010/11 Increase 30,432
2011/12 Increase 34,556
2012/13 Decrease 31,852
History
Post-grouping Southern Railway
26 September 1938 Opened
1975 Reduced to single track
National RailUK railway stations
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
* Annual estimated passenger usage based on sales of tickets in stated financial year(s) which end or originate at Bishopstone from Office of Rail Regulation statistics. Methodology may vary year on year.
Portal icon UK Railways portal

Bishopstone railway station is on the western side of the town of Seaford, East Sussex, England. It is situated close to the coast, and about 1 mile (1.6 km) from the hamlet of Bishopstone after which it is named. Train services from the station are provided by Southern, and the station is on the Seaford Branch of the East Coastway Line.

Before this station opened the first Bishopstone station was 0.6 miles (1 km) further west at Tide Mills. That was closed in 1938 when the current station opened, but was subsequently reopened under the name of Bishopstone Beach Halt, and survived as such until 1942.

Buildings and structures[edit]

The present station was opened on 26 September 1938, the same day that the original Bishopstone station at Tide Mills was first closed. The Art Deco design is said to be inspired by that of Arnos Grove tube station, which was designed by Charles Holden, and was intended to be the centrepiece of a proposed residential development that never took place due to the outbreak of the Second World War.[1]

The main building of the station is symmetrical, with an octagonal central booking hall and two extended wings. One of these wings formerly contained the ticket office and parcels office, and the other contained a waiting room and toilets. As built, the station had two side platforms in a cutting, accessed by stairs from a footbridge linking to the main station building.[1]

In 1940 a pair of pillboxes was built on the roof of the main station building, flanking its octagonal tower. Despite the times, considerable effort was made to blend these into the original structure, and they are thus well camouflaged.[1]

The last member of staff to work at the station was withdrawn in 1988. Today the old booking office and parcel office is occupied by a small newsagents, and the remaining station facilities are disused; but the main access to the trains is still via the octagonal booking hall. The line was singled in 1975 and all trains now use the former up platform.[1]

Bishopstone Station is a grade II listed building. Because it is unstaffed and unsupervised, and the fact that it is largely boarded up and disused, it is on English Heritage's at risk register.[1]

Services[edit]

As of May 2011 the typical off-peak service is:

There are also two through trains to London Victoria on weekday mornings, and one in the opposite direction in the evening.[2]

Preceding station National Rail National Rail Following station
Newhaven Harbour   Southern
Seaford Branch Line
  Seaford
Historical railways
Bishopstone Beach Halt
Line open, station closed
  Southern Railway
Seaford Branch Line
  Seaford
Line open, station open

Incidents[edit]

On 3 July 1940 Luftwaffe fighter aircraft machine-gunned and bombed a train near Bishopstone Station. The train driver was killed and several passengers were wounded.[citation needed]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Leigh, Chris (12 January 2011). "Above their station: Bishopstone". Rail Magazine (661) (Bauer Media Group). pp. 61–62. 
  2. ^ "Rail Timetable Table 189". Network Rail. May 2011. 

External links[edit]


Coordinates: 50°46′48″N 0°04′59″E / 50.780°N 0.083°E / 50.780; 0.083