Bixente Lizarazu

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Bixente Lizarazu
Bixente Lizarazu.jpg
Lizarazu in 2011
Personal information
Full name Bixente Lizarazu
Date of birth (1969-12-09) 9 December 1969 (age 44)
Place of birth Saint-Jean-de-Luz, France
Height 1.69 m (5 ft 7 in)
Playing position Left back
Youth career
1977–1988 Les Églantins Hendaye
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1986–1989 Bordeaux B 43 (10)
1988–1996 Bordeaux 246 (22)
1996–1997 Athletic Bilbao 16 (0)
1997–2004 Bayern Munich 151 (7)
2004 Olympique Marseille 14 (0)
2005–2006 Bayern Munich 31 (0)
Total 501 (39)
National team
1992–2004 France 97 (2)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.
† Appearances (Goals).

Bixente Lizarazu (Basque pronunciation: [biˈʃente lis̻aˈɾas̻u]), initially registered as Vincent Lizarazu,[1] (born 9 December 1969) is a retired French footballer who played for Bordeaux and Bayern Munich, among other teams. He also had 97 caps for the French national team.

In a twelve-year international career from 1992 to 2004, Lizarazu played in three European championships and two World Cups for France, winning the 1998 World Cup and Euro 2000.

Club career[edit]

Before moving to Germany, Lizarazu played for Girondins de Bordeaux, where he played in the 1996 UEFA Cup Final against Bayern; and Athletic Bilbao.[2] He has won six Bundesliga championships with Bayern Munich, as well as five times the DFB-Pokal, the Champions League, and the Intercontinental Cup.[2] On winning the Intercontinental Cup in 2001, he became the first player to be a current European and World champion in club and international football.

Lizarazu said that he would leave Bayern in the Summer of 2004 and eventually signed with Olympique Marseille. However, six months after signing with Marseille, he returned to Bayern Munich in January 2005. During his second spell with Bayern Munich, ending in 2006, Lizarazu wore the shirt number 69. Clarifying that it wasn't a lewd gesture, he said this was because he was born in 1969, his height is 1.69 m and he weighed 69 kg.[3]

International career[edit]

Lizarazu was capped 97 times for France (for the first time on 14 November 1992 against Finland[4]), scoring two goals, and helped them win the 1998 FIFA World Cup and Euro 2000.[2]

Personal life[edit]

After retirement, Lizarazu got involved in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. He competed in a Jiu-Jitsu competition in Europe in 2009, where he became European champion in the Blue Belt Senior 1 Light Division.[5][6]

Career statistics[edit]

Club[edit]

[7][8]
Club performance League Cup League Cup Continental Total
Season Club League Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
France League Coupe de France Coupe de la Ligue Europe Total
1988–89 Girondins de Bordeaux Division 1 16 0
1989–90 38 2
1990–91 35 2
1991–92 Division 2 33 0
1992–93 Division 1 35 4
1993–94 32 9
1994–95 32 2
1995–96 23 3
Spain League Copa del Rey Supercopa de España Europe Total
1996–97 Athletic Bilbao La Liga 16 0
Germany League DFB-Pokal Other Europe Total
1997–98 Bayern Munich Bundesliga 11 0 3 0
1998–99 18 2 5 1
1999–00 22 1 1 0
2000–01 15 0 1 0
2001–02 25 1 1 0
2002–03 26 2 5 0
2003–04 26 1 1 0
France League Coupe de France Coupe de la Ligue Europe Total
2004–05 Olympique Marseille Ligue 1 14 0
Germany League DFB-Pokal Other Europe Total
2004–05 Bayern Munich Bundesliga 13 0 2 0
2005–06 18 0 2 0
Total France 258 22
Spain 16 0
Germany 174 7
Career total 448 29

[9]

France national team
Year Apps Goals
1992 1 0
1993 6 0
1994 5 0
1995 5 1
1996 9 0
1997 4 0
1998 13 1
1999 6 0
2000 12 0
2001 10 0
2002 7 0
2003 12 0
2004 7 0
Total 97 2

International goals[edit]

# Date Venue Opponent Score Result Competition
1. 15 November 1995[10] Stade Michel d'Ornano, Caen, France  Israel
2 – 0
2 – 0
UEFA Euro 1996 qualifying
2. 18 June 1998[11] Stade de France, Saint-Denis, France  Saudi Arabia
4 – 0
4 – 0
1998 FIFA World Cup

Honours[edit]

Club[edit]

Bordeaux[2]
Bayern Munich[12][2]

International[edit]

France[12]

Individual[edit]

Orders[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ According to Lizarazu in an interview on 3 November 2009 by Philippe Vandel for France Info, a town hall employee did not want to register his Basque name which had been chosen by his parents and put the French equivalent Vincent instead.
  2. ^ a b c d e "Bixente Lizarazu". UEFA.com. 18 February 2014. Retrieved 21 April 2014. 
  3. ^ Bandini, Paolo; Bass, Ian; Dart, James (27 September 2006). "Have any footballers ever admitted moving for the money?". The Guardian (UK). Retrieved 27 September 2006. 
  4. ^ "Bixente LIZARAZU" (in French). fff.fr. Retrieved 21 April 2014. 
  5. ^ "NomeFaixaIdadePesoColocacaoAcademia". Ibjjf.org. Retrieved 28 April 2011. 
  6. ^ [1][dead link]
  7. ^ "LIZARAZU (Bixente Lizarazu) – Retired football (soccer) player from France". Footballdatabase.com. Retrieved 28 April 2011. [dead link]
  8. ^ "Lizarazu, Bixente" (in German). kicker.de. Retrieved 22 April 2014. 
  9. ^ Pla Diaz, Emilio (1 October 2004). "Bixente Lizarazu - International Appearances". RSSSF. Retrieved 28 April 2011. 
  10. ^ "Match - France - Israel" (in French). fff.fr. Retrieved 21 April 2014. 
  11. ^ "Match - France - Arabie Saoudite" (in French). fff.fr. Retrieved 21 April 2014. 
  12. ^ a b "Bixente Lizarazu" (in German). fussballdaten.de. Retrieved 22 April 2014. 
  13. ^ "France honors World Cup winners – Government gives Legion of Honor to players, coaches". CNN/SI. 1 September 1998. Retrieved 20 July 2006. 
  14. ^ "Décret du 24 juillet 1998 portant nomination à titre exceptionnel". JORF 1998 (170): 11376. 25 July 1998. PREX9801916D. Retrieved 10 March 2009. 

External links[edit]