Björn Engquist

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Björn Engquist
Björn Engquist.jpg
Born (1945-06-02) 2 June 1945 (age 69)
Stockholm, Sweden
Nationality Sweden
Fields Applied mathematics
Institutions University of California, Los Angeles
Princeton University
University of Texas at Austin
Alma mater University of Uppsala
Doctoral advisor Heinz-Otto Kreiss
Known for Essentially Non-Oscillatory schemes
Multiscale modeling

Björn Engquist (also Bjorn Engquist; born 2 June 1945 in Stockholm) has been a leading contributor in the areas of multiscale modeling and scientific computing, and a productive educator of applied mathematicians.

He received his Ph.D. in numerical analysis from University of Uppsala in 1975, and taught there during the following years while also holding a professorship at the University of California, Los Angeles. In 2001, he moved to Princeton University as the Michael Henry Stater University Professor of Mathematics and served as the director of the Program in Applied and Computational Mathematics. He has also been professor at the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm since 1993, and is director of the Parallel and Scientific Computing Institute. Engquist currently holds the Computational and Applied Mathematics Chair I at the Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences at the University of Texas at Austin, after leaving Princeton in 2005.

His research field is computational and applied mathematics and numerical methods for differential equations with applications to multi-scale modeling, electromagnetism, and fluid mechanics. Engquist has authored more than 100 scientific publications and advised 31 PhD students. He is a recipient of numerous distinctions and awards: a member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences and the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences, and an invited speaker at the International Congress of Mathematicians (1982 and 1998), European Congress of Mathematics (1992), and European Congress of Fluid Mechanics (1991).[citation needed] He was selected to the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters in 2011.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Diplomer til nye medlemmer på Akademiets årsmøte" (in Norwegian). Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters. 25 April 2011. Retrieved 5 June 2011. 

External links[edit]