Black-throated munia

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Black-throated munia
LonchuraKelaartiKeulemans.png
Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Passeriformes
Family: Estrildidae
Genus: Lonchura
Species: L. kelaarti
Binomial name
Lonchura kelaarti
(Jerdon, 1863)

The black-throated munia or Jerdon's mannikin (Lonchura kelaarti) is a small passerine bird. This estrildid finch is a resident breeding bird in the hills of southwest India, the Eastern Ghats and Sri Lanka.

Habitat[edit]

The black-throated munia is a small gregarious bird which feeds mainly on seeds. It frequents open hill woodland and cultivation. The nest is a large domed grass structure in a tree or creepers on a house into which 3-8 white eggs are laid in India, and usually five in Sri Lanka.

Characteristics[edit]

L. k. jerdoni

The black-throated munia is 12 cm in length with a long black tail. The adult of the south Indian has a stubby grey bill, dark brown upperparts and blackish head, breast and wings. L. k. kelaarti has pinkish underparts and rump, and L. k. jerdoni has barred black and white underparts and rump. The sexes are similar, but immature lack the darker head and have uniform underparts.

Commemoration[edit]

The binomial commemorates the zoologist Edward Frederick Kelaart and the name was given by Thomas C. Jerdon in 1863.

Origin[edit]

Origin and phylogeny has been obtained by Antonio Arnaiz-Villena et al..[2] Estrildinae may have originated in India and dispersed thereafter (towards Africa and Pacific Ocean habitats).

References[edit]

  1. ^ BirdLife International (2012). "Lonchura kelaarti". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 26 November 2013. 
  2. ^ Arnaiz-Villena, A; Ruiz-del-Valle V; Gomez-Prieto P; Reguera R; Parga-Lozano C; Serrano-Vela I (2009). "Estrildinae Finches (Aves, Passeriformes) from Africa, South Asia and Australia: a Molecular Phylogeographic Study". The Open Ornithology Journal 2: 29–36. doi:10.2174/1874453200902010029.