Black Coffee (All Saints song)

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"Black Coffee"
An image of four young women sitting on a couch in a lounge room wearing baggy pants and casual t-shirts and long-sleeved shirts. Each woman portrays a different facial expression and their clothing matches non-systematically the colours red, blue and white. Above them in large white sparkling font is the name 'All Saints' spread in a non-linear fashion over the image. Underneath the name is the title "Black Coffee" in a small white capital-letter font.
Single by All Saints
from the album Saints & Sinners
B-side "I Don't Wanna Be Alone"
Released 2 October 2000
Format
Recorded Guerilla Beach Studios and Larrabee West (Los Angeles), Sarm West and Olympic Studios (London)
Genre
Length 4:49
Label London
Writer(s)
Producer(s) William Orbit
All Saints singles chronology
"Pure Shores"
(2000)
"Black Coffee"
(2000)
"All Hooked Up"
(2001)

"Black Coffee" is a song recorded by English-Canadian girl group All Saints for their second studio album, Saints & Sinners (2000). It later appeared on the group's greatest hits albums, All Hits (2001) and Pure Shores: The Very Best of All Saints (2010). The song was written by Alexander Von Soos, Kirsty Elizabeth and Tom Nichols, and produced by William Orbit. Originally titled "I Wouldn't Wanna Be", the track was first conceptualized by Elizabeth based on her romance with Ernesto Bertarelli before being handed to London Records executive Tracy Bennett. It was released worldwide on 2 October 2000 as the second single from Saints & Sinners, through various physical formats accompanied by remixes from The Neptunes, Wideboys, AFTC, and the b-side "I Don't Wanna Be Alone". A midtempo electronic pop song, "Black Coffee" chronicles a love story with a contrary theme of bitterness, and garnered comparisons with previous William Orbit productions, namely "Pure Shores" and tracks from Madonna's Ray of Light (1998). The track's structure includes slightly dislocated verses delivered in a sinister manner, followed by the group's combined harmony sung in an eerie fashion leading up to the song's wistful chorus. Lyrically, it discusses how two lovers meet and are in a moment where they would not want to be elsewhere.

"Black Coffee" was met with general acclaim from contemporary music critics who praised All Saints' mature and accomplished sound, vocal harmonies and William Orbit's production. Some critics deemed the song one of the group's greatest hits and a pop classic which would later inspire the sound of their girl group contemporary, Girls Aloud. The single was a commercial success, becoming All Saints' fifth number one single on the UK Singles Chart, at the time making them the girl group with the second-most number ones in British chart history. "Black Coffee" was also a hit internationally, reaching the top ten in Ireland, Italy, New Zealand and Sweden, and the top 40 in nine other countries. It was among the best-selling singles of 2000 in the United Kingdom, later being certified silver for sales of over 200,000 copies.

The song's accompanying music video was directed by Johan Renck and aired on 14 September 2000. The video which garnered comparisons to the science fiction action film The Matrix (1999), is set in a high rise apartment at night and features the group singing from the rooftop of the apartment floor as a couple engage in a dramatic argument depicted in slow motion. The song's recording and release was surrounded by group in-fighting which became visible in tense live performances of the song and in its music video where each group member shot their scene separately. "Black Coffee" was promoted with live performances on Top of the Pops, Later... with Jools Holland, Smash Hits Poll Winners Party, Children in Need and as part of All Saints' set list on the In a World Like This Tour (2014).

Background[edit]

"[When composing 'Black Coffee'] I liked stuff which was slightly left of centre, not completely mainstream. Obviously it was still very commercial, still everything you hear on the radio, but I preferred to do something just slightly out of the ordinary. It was always pop music, but various. I also found that more and more in the last few years, what the radio is playing is less mainstream pop and more quirky pop music."

—Co-writer Tom Nichols speaking to Kimber Bouwman from HitQuarters about the melodic inspiration behind "Black Coffee".[1]

"Black Coffee" was originally written by British model Kirsty Elizabeth.[2] At the time, Elizabeth decided to pursue a career as a singer-songwriter, dabbling in modelling to pay her way.[2] Her agent entered her for Miss UK aged 17, she won the competition and went on to come third in Miss World in 1988.[2] Despite these events, Elizabeth was persistent to follow through with her singer-songwriter aspirations.[2] Speaking to Gavanddra Hodge of the London Evening Standard, Elizabeth mentioned, "'I'm quite proud of it, but I quickly realised being a beauty queen wasn't something I wanted to do." She went on to quip, "When you have a passion for something, when you are very creative, you can't just let go of it, it is always there."[2] Elizabeth then moved to London and devoted herself to making music. She was visiting different recording studios desperately trying to earn a contract and make a success of herself.[2] Elizabeth would constantly write lyrics on anything she could find: napkins, pieces of paper and cigarette packets.[2] She then began working with disc jockey Gary Davies, recording in a makeshift studio and a recording deal was later in the offing with Warner Bros. Records.[2] Elizabeth then met successful entrepreneur Ernesto Bertarelli, this event was said to both kickstart and stall her recording career.[2] In 1997, Bertarelli was holidaying off the coast of Sardinia, staying on his yacht Vava.[2] At a dinner with friends, Bertarelli met Elizabeth who was single after a two-year relationship with the conservationist Damian Aspinall.[2] Elizabeth described this event as love at first sight and the birth of the song "I Wouldn't Wanna Be".[2][3]

Following Kirsty Elizabeth's original writing of "I Wouldn't Wanna Be", her collaborator at the time DJ Gary Davies, passed her work onto another aspiring singer-songwriter Tom Nichols to add his writing input in an attempt to establish the song as a single for Elizabeth.[1] The track then received additional writing from Alexander Van Soos and Elizabeth went on to record the demo version of the song.[4] Davies then searched for a major record label to sign Elizabeth.[1] He approached Tracy Bennett, an executive at London Records, and played "I Wouldn't Wanna Be" to her.[1] Bennett declined Davies' offer for her to sign Elizabeth, and instead wanted the song to be recorded by All Saints as their follow-up to "Pure Shores" for the group's Saints & Sinners album.[1] Davies approved Bennett's offer, and he, together with Elizabeth and Nichols were in a back and forth situation where they were unsure if the song was going to be cut.[1] "I Wouldn't Wanna Be" was then retitled "Black Coffee" and handed to producer William Orbit.[1][3] Nichols told Kimbel Bouwman of HitQuarters that the song's demo version was completely different to the outcome of Orbit's production and that it sounded "fantastic".[1] "Black Coffee" would later go on to be a career-changing song for both Elizabeth and Nichols.[2] Nichols went on to become a successful songwriter, writing for the likes of Kylie Minogue, Jessica Simpson and the Sugababes.[1] Nichols quipped in his interview with HitQuarters, "The moment 'Black Coffee' got released, the phone just started ringing and didn't stop," adding, "So I owe a lot to the All Saints and to Tracy Bennett at London [...] they are a large further reason why I have a career because suddenly when that song was released, the opportunities that [I got] certainly in the UK, but also Europe-wide, [were] absolutely huge."[1] While Elizabeth was signed to Warner Bros. but then parted ways with the label and put her musical career on hold after marrying Ernesto Bertarelli in 2000, performing "Black Coffee" at their wedding.[2]

 A young woman with blonde hair singing into a microphone on a stand while wearing a black top with the wording 'Prepare to be boarded' and dark sunglasses.
Group member Natalie Appleton's original lead vocal recording of "Black Coffee" was sidelined by the band's manager Steve Finan.[5]

All Saints were working on Saints & Sinners for a substantial period of time, having written 40 songs for the album, in addition to working around William Orbit's busy schedule.[5] During the original recording of the song, group member Natalie Appleton sung the lead vocal for the track's second verse and chorus with Shaznay Lewis singing the song's first and last verses.[6] Natalie then spent a night recording a vocal to "Black Coffee" which was deemed "perfect" but at the last minute, Natalie's vocal was switched to a backing vocal and was replaced with Lewis singing the track's second verse.[6] This among other events lead to in-fighting within the group before the time "Black Coffee" was released.[5] The replacement of Natalie's lead vocal as well as Nicole Appleton's on the song and other tracks on the album left the two members feeling sidelined to backing vocalists for the majority of the album, in favour of Lewis and Melanie Blatt's lead vocal.[5] The Appleton sisters were "frustrated and disappointed" about this result and later pleaded their case to their manager, Steve Finan,[5] in a group meeting which ended in a feud between Blatt and Natalie Appleton where Blatt threatened to leave All Saints.[7]

The group recorded "Black Coffee" at Guerilla Beach Studios and Larrabee West in Los Angeles, and at Olympic and Sarm West Studios in London.[4] The song was engineered by Clif Norrell, Iain Robertson, Ren Swan and Sean Spuehler, with the assistance of Michelle Forbes and Tom Hannen.[4] It was then mixed by Mark "Spike" Stent and arranged by All Saints and William Orbit.[4] Orbit handled the majority of the song's instrumental production, namely; keyboards, guitar and its synthesizer.[4] Engineer Spuehler was also involved with the track's keyboards in addition to its programming and computer Pro Tools.[4]

Release[edit]

On 14 August 2000, NME announced that the group would release "Black Coffee" as the follow-up to "Pure Shores".[8] The song was released as All Saints' second single from Saints & Sinners on 2 October 2000.[9] London Records serviced the single internationally on the date through various cassette,[9] CD[10] and 12" musical formats.[11] Most formats featured the song accompanied by a b-side titled "I Don't Wanna Be Alone" which was written by group member Shaznay Lewis, Ali Tennant, Wayne Hector and its producer Karl "K-Gee" Gordon.[4] In addition to the b-side, some of the formats were accompanied by various house and dance remixes produced by AFTC, Shadow Sniper, Wideboys and The Neptunes which features an uncredited rap from American hip-hop duo Clipse.[4] Wideboys' remix work on the song resulted in the duo later collaborating with Lewis on their 2008 single "Daddy O".[12] All Saints went on to incorporate "Black Coffee" and its Wideboys Remix on their first compilation album All Hits (2001),[13] as well as on Pure Shores: The Very Best of All Saints (2010), which also featured The Neptunes Remix of the song and its b-side "I Don't Wanna Be Alone".[14] The song is also All Saints' only single not to be co-written by Shaznay Lewis.[14] In 2007, "Black Coffee" was included on the "Pop Hits" release for competitive music video game series SingStar.[15]

Composition[edit]

A 29-second sample of the song's outro, where All Saints can be heard singing "Night swimming / Beach walking / Always silent / Never talking / Then you call my name / And I know inside I love you / Sail away / I miss you more / Until you see the shore / There I will be waiting / Anticipating." —a lyrical narrative of a romance between two lovers.[2]

Problems playing this file? See media help.

"Black Coffee" is a midtempo electronic,[16] pop song,[17] which runs for a duration of four minutes and 49 seconds.[4] It features a harmony-laden chorus accompanied by a sonical sense of sass,[18] lush electronic landscapes and a techno-dance breadown in the track's outro.[16] Instrumentally, the song consists of a keyboard,[4] guitar and synth-driven melody which gives way to a weird and "whooshy" sound.[19] Production-wise, "Black Coffee" incorporates an ambient tomfoolery developed by William Orbit,[20] of which is combined with liquid techno qualities.[21] The song's production has been noted to compliment its final outcome as its most prominent factor and is sonically more heavy than in previous singles released by the girl band.[19] The track's structure includes slightly dislocated verses delivered in a sinister manner,[19] followed by the group's combined harmony sung in an eerie fashion leading up to the song's wistful chorus.[22] Neil Hannon of The Divine Comedy said that "Black Coffee" flouts the general rules of a pop song.[19] All Saints use a soothing mellow tone to sing "Black Coffee" over its glossy,[22] hazy beat to portray its haunting, hypnotic and dream-like overall feel and storyline.[17] According to the sheet music published at Sheetmusicplus.com, the song is written in common time with a moderately fast tempo of 120 beats per minute.[23] The track follows a basic sequence of Bm7–E–Bm7–E as its chord progression in the bridge, while the chorus has a progression of E–Bm–D–A.[23]

Lyrically, "Black Coffee" was co-written by Kirsty Elizabeth as a song about falling in love, and discusses how two lovers meet and are in a moment where they would not want to be elsewhere.[24] It chronicles a love story and contains a contrary theme of bitterness.[22] The lyric "Brush your teeth / Pour yourself a cup of black coffee" depicts an everyday routine in an alluring manner as described by The Guardian critic Caroline Sullivan.[20] Regarding the chorus lyric "I wouldn't want to take everything out on you / Though I know I do", NME journalist Siobhan Grogan wrote that All Saints make sadness sound alluring in a way only the bitterest of love songs can.[22] In an interview with the International Business Times Kirsty Elizabeth quipped, "I get inspired by life, my songs are all from real experiences and observations," adding, "If something moves me, it compels me to write about it, it's important to write from the heart."[24] Neil Hannon interpreted the track as one with uplifting themes which buoy its listener up when they are "down in the dumps."[19] According to Elizabeth the song was inspired about falling in love with Ernesto Bertarelli, "It's a love story recalling how we met: We were doing lots of sailing at the time and we didn't want to be anywhere else."[24] The lyrics "Daydreaming / Chain-smoking / Always laughing / Always joking / I remain the same / Did I tell you that I love you?" chart a narrative of Elizabeth and Ernesto's romance.[2] Speaking to Gavanndra Hodge of the London Evening Standard, Elizabeth elaborated on the song's lyrical story: "You know when you fall for someone, when you talk to them and you start to go red."[2] She added "I became very bashful and he had the same response to me, we only had eyes for each other," concluding "I was hoping he would call and thank God he did."[2] Musically, "Black Coffee" garnered comparisons with previous William Orbit productions, namely "Pure Shores" and tracks from Madonna's Ray of Light (1998).[21]

Critical reception[edit]

"Black Coffee" was met with general acclaim from contemporary music critics who regarded the song as one of All Saints' greatest hits.[25] Siobhan Grogan of NME deemed the song "almost perfect" and likened it to its predecessor "Pure Shores" for its "mellow, glossy haziness," adding that it was if the group recorded the track lying down.[22] Grogan went on to further laud the song sonically, opining, "It's wistful in all the right places and makes sadness sound rather alluring like only the bitterest love songs can."[22] She concluded her review, mentioning, "if they keep coming up with songs like this, they can stay on the radio a little longer."[22] Russell Baillie from The New Zealand Herald highlighted "Black Coffee" in addition to "Pure Shores" and "Surrender", as the three songs that put the majority of Saints & Sinners to shade.[26] Echoing Baillie's view was Nigel Packer of the BBC, who agreed that the track together with its single predecessor were the album's most essential components.[21] The song was positively reviewed by critics from The Birmingham Post: Simon Evans called the track a "beautiful slice of haunting, hypnotic pop,"[17] and Andrew Cohen deemed the song "just awesome."[27] A critic from the Western Mail felt that "Black Coffee" was as "equally tremendous" as "Pure Shores".[28] Sean O'Brien from The Sunday People awarded the song an eight (out of ten)-rating, mentioning that "great things are expected when it goes on sale."[29] Julie MacCaskill of the Daily Record wrote that the song serves as a testament to the group's pop power.[30] Caroline Sullivan from The Guardian said that "Black Coffee" was superior to "Pure Shores", praising its "beguiling treatment of a domestic scenario."[20] Sullivan went on to highlight the line "Brush your teeth, pour yourself a cup of black coffee" as "easily the most alluring depiction of a bleary-eyed morning routine ever recorded."[20]

In a review of Pure Shores: The Very Best of All Saints on 27 September 2010, AllMusic's Jon O'Brien felt that "Black Coffee" was among All Saints' most accomplished and mature work, praising its "lush electronic landscapes."[16] "Black Coffee" was awarded a four and a half (out of five)-star rating by Cameron Adams of the Herald Sun who later listed it among the best singles released in 2000,[31] while Kathy McCabe from the same publication described the song as a "benchmark of sassy, harmony-laden pop".[18] Popjustice's John Lucas called the track a "solid gold 11/10 pop moment".[32] Cover Me Canada positively reviewed the song, "All Saints sound extra lovely when they work with William Orbit," adding, "A pinch of electronic flavour suits their vibe".[33] In the January 2001 British issue of Elle, journalist Louise Gannon lauded "Black Coffee" as one of "the best songs of the last few years."[34] IGN writer Rob Burman deemed the song "a pop classic".[15] Seamus Duff of Metro wrote in an article on 18 November 2013 that "Black Coffee" still sounded as fresh and relevant as it did when released over 13 years ago.[35] Neil Hannon from The Divine Comedy listed the song in "The Hidden Gems That Have Pop Stars Hooked", an article compiled by The Guardian music critic Jude Rogers.[19] In the article, Hannon commented:

"People always say: Well, I like the early work of so-and-so. Me, I like the later work of All Saints. The William Orbit stuff. It's ultra-produced, but for once this adds to the sound of it, rather than taking anything away. 'Black Coffee' is particularly good. [...] Girls Aloud do pop like that now: songs like 'Biology' are a bit weird, and they flout the general rules, and I admire that. But 'Black Coffee' is better. I got into it when I'd got over – what should we call it? – my first flush of fame. My "tricky period". When I'm down in the dumps, I get cheered up by plastic pop. It's clear as crystal; it's hardly there. If you want it intellectual and soulful, you can look to the Pet Shop Boys. But if you just want it to buoy you up, you've got songs like this."[19]

Chart performance[edit]

"Black Coffee" was a commercial success for All Saints both in the United Kingdom and internationally.[2] In the United Kingdom, the track debuted at number one on the UK Singles Chart on 14 October 2000, selling 88,940 copies in its first week,[36] replacing "Against All Odds" by Mariah Carey and Westlife at the top of the chart.[37] Upon this result, Shaznay Lewis told BBC Radio 1 that it was "good to know that all the hard work had paid off."[38] The song dropped to number three in its second week and had a total run of four consecutive weeks within the UK top ten.[37] "Black Coffee" became All Saints' fifth and final number one single in the United Kingdom, additionally making the group the girl band with the second most number one singles in British chart history,[39] after the Spice Girls who have scored a total of nine number ones.[40] All Saints' record was later bettered by the Sugababes who achieved their sixth number one with "About You Now" in 2007.[41] "Black Coffee" went on to spend a total of 18 weeks on the UK Singles Chart, becoming All Saints' second longest charting single on it, only after the 24 weeks achieved by "Never Ever" (1997).[39] On 20 October 2000, the song was certified Silver by the British Phonographic Industry, denoting shipments of over 200,000 copies.[42] "Black Coffee" ended the year as the 39th best-selling single in the United Kingdom.[43]

In Australia, "Black Coffee" debuted on the Australian Singles Chart at number 29 on 15 October 2000, and fell to number 45 the following week.[44] The song peaked at number 20 for two consecutive weeks, after having spent eight weeks fluctuating in the top 50.[44] In total the song spent 15 weeks on the chart and is All Saints' fifth top 20 hit in Australia.[44] In New Zealand, the song entered the New Zealand Singles Chart at number 41 on 29 October 2000, and peaked at number seven.[45] It marks the group's fifth top ten hit in New Zealand and spent three weeks inside the top ten and 15 weeks in total on the chart.[45]

In Ireland, "Black Coffee" debuted and peaked at number six on the Irish Singles Chart on 5 October 2000,[46] becoming All Saints' fifth and final top ten hit there.[47] The track accumulated three weeks in the top ten and eight weeks on the chart in total.[48] In Sweden, the song entered and peaked at number eight on the Swedish Singles Chart on 12 October 2000, and stayed on the chart for a total of 14 weeks.[49] "Black Coffee" is the band's third top ten hit in Sweden and their second most successful single there to-date, bettering the peak of number ten achieved by its predecessor "Pure Shores" but falling short of the peak of number three achieved by "Never Ever" in 1998.[49] It ended the year as the 97th best-selling song in Sweden for 2000.[50] In Italy, the song first appeared and peaked at number seven on the Italian Singles Chart on 5 October 2000, marking the group's second consecutive and third overall top ten single there.[51][52] "Black Coffee" went on to fluctuate within the chart's top 20 for a total of five weeks,[51] and ended 2000 as the 93rd best-selling single in Italy.[53] In Finland, the track debuted and peaked at number 11 on the Finnish Singles Chart, one position short of becoming the girl band's third top ten hit in the country.[54] "Black Coffee" spent a total of two weeks on the chart.[54] In Norway, the song entered at its peak position of number 14, spending a total of three weeks within the chart's top 20 and marking All Saints' fourth top 20 hit there.[55] In The Netherlands, "Black Coffee" debuted at number 51 on the Dutch Singles Chart on 7 October 2000, peaking at number 24 in its third week on the chart.[56] The song went on to chart for a total of eight weeks and is the group's fifth top 40 hit in the country.[56] On the Swiss Singles Chart, the track first appeared at number 49 on 15 October 2000 and peaked at number 28 three weeks later.[57] It charted for 14 weeks accumulatively and marked All Saints' fifth top 40 hit in Switzerland.[57] The single also reached the top 40 in France,[58] Germany[59] and in the Wallonia region of Belgium,[60] charting at numbers 31, 33 and 39 respectively. "Black Coffee" was less successful in the Flanders region of Belgium, where the song peaked at number 42.[61]

Music video[edit]

"Black Coffee" was accompanied by a music video directed by Johan Renck, who at the time was recognized for his previous work with Madonna on her video for "Nothing Really Matters" (1999).[62] All Saints and Renck filmed the music video on 17 August 2000 and it first aired on 4 September 2000.[63] Following numerous feuds between the Appletons, and Blatt and Lewis, and disputes with London Records, the band agreed with London to shoot the video for "Black Coffee" separately.[64] Each group member in turn shot their scene with Renck at a different time to another member, the group are not seen altogether once in the music video.[64] This strategy would later be replicated in All Saints' following music video for "All Hooked Up" (2001).[65] The video is set in a high rise apartment at night and features the group singing from the rooftop of the apartment floor as a couple engage in a dramatic argument depicted in slow motion.[33] Television show Cover Me Canada ranked the video as the fifth-best that All Saints have released to-date, likening its use of slow motion to that used in the science fiction action film The Matrix (1999).[33] The show went on to compliment how the song's electronic qualities "really set the tone for the video," adding, "When was the last time you had an angelic serenade during an argument?"[33] The music video for "Black Coffee" also appears on the group's video compilation The Videos.[66]

Live performances[edit]

All Saints opened BBC One's People Awards in 2000 with a performance of "Black Coffee".[67] The girl band performed the track on 17 November 2000 on Children in Need,[68] by this time Nicole Appleton was dealing with her highly publicized pregnancy in addition to group in-fighting, which was recognized backstage at the Children in Need dressing room by Nicole's friends, Kate Thornton and Melanie Chisholm.[69] Nicole's boyfriend Liam Gallagher, who was also in the dressing room commented, "Nic and Nat are working really hard, but it doesn't matter what they do - [Shaznay and Melanie] have got it in for them," adding, "You don't try treat people like that, trying to control their lives."[69] On 18 November 2000, the group performed the song in a set including "Pure Shores" and "Whoopin' Over You" on Later... with Jools Holland.[70] "Black Coffee" was also performed live on Top of the Pops[71] At the Smash Hits Poll Winners Party in December 2000, All Saints sung "Black Coffee", which was met with a poor review from Betty Clarke of The Guardian.[72] In her review of performances from the ceremony, Clarke commented, "Only All Saints let the side down, going through the motions as the girls around me point at Nicole Appleton and giggle."[72] At the time of the performance there was still tension between the Appletons, and Melanie Blatt and Shaznay Lewis.[73] In the Appletons' autobiography, Natalie Appleton mentioned that she and Nicole were being excluded from and ignored by Blatt and Lewis, "It was as if Nic and I were not there."[73] Natalie also stated that by this time the group were no longer sharing hairdressers and make-up artists anymore, adding, "Our hairdresser, Alex, and our make-up artist, Sarah, were also being ignored."[73] The song was also performed at the Capital Radio Awards that month.[74] At the event, Natalie Appleton and Shaznay Lewis fought over a jacket that Natalie organised through her stylist, Neil Mortan, to wear for the performance, which was later worn by Lewis while Natalie was preparing for the show.[74] The two got involved in a heated argument backstage and the tension would later be visible on stage during their performance of "Black Coffee" and "Pure Shores".[74]

"That night, Shaznay and Mel played up the separation on stage. To get at [Nicole and I], throughout the entire performance Shaznay went to Mel and interacted only with her, singing only to her. As the lead singers, they thrived on it. They overdid the whole thing - over-performing, over-hugging each other, grabbing the attention. Nic and I were not on lead vocals so this made it harder for us. We looked at each other. It was so juvenile. It made us all look stupid. We felt embarrassed and wondered what the fans thought. Singing the backing vocals and harmonies on 'Pure Shores' and 'Black Coffee', my head and stomach were churning. Shaznay got all the credit, all the good press and, now, my coat. What more did she want from me? Every shred of my dignity and pride?"

—Natalie Appleton on her feud with Shaznay Lewis and the performance at the Capital Radio Awards which ultimately lead to All Saints' splitting up in 2001.[74][75]

In 2014, All Saints embarked on a tour of the United Kingdom and Ireland with boy band Backstreet Boys as part of their In a World Like This Tour.[76] "Black Coffee" featured as the seventh song for the tour's set list and the girl band's performance at the tour's Birmingham date on 26 March 2014, marked their first live performance in six years.[77] Emma Kelly of the Daily Star positively reviewed the group's performance at their Birmingham date, deeming it "impressive".[76] Kelly also praised the girl band's fashion in the performance, writing, "Rocking nineties fashions and looking as youthful as ever, the girls performed beneath a glittering gold sign baring their name."[76] She added, "While the logo and the accompanying cross looked like they had been borrowed from the fashion boutique of the same name, the girls stayed true to their style, wearing sporty trackie jackets and casual leggings and trousers."[76] Kelly concluded her review, highlighting Shaznay Lewis' retro gold lamé tracksuit zip-up as the most eye-catching of the performance.[76] Marianne Gunn from Scottish newspaper The Herald gave the group's performance at their Glasgow date a mixed review, Gunn deemed the performance of "Black Coffee" harmonius, and praised the girl band's vocal abilities and Lewis' and Melanie Blatt's stage personality.[78] Gunn was however critical of All Saints' choreography, dynamism, charisma and the Appletons' "perpetually lacklustre" stage presence.[78] The Glasgow performance garnered a better review from Evening Times digital journalist Stacey Mullen who mentioned, "It was like the girls had never left the stage - the only criticism, they weren't on longer."[79] At the gig, group member Shaznay Lewis said "Preparing for this gig has just been amazing," adding, "We've had so much fun."[79] All Saints' performance of the song at the tour's Manchester date was well received by Kirsty McHale of the Manchester Evening News, who commented, "the newly-reformed girl band duly brought their own slice of nostalgia to the evening, and with hits like 'Pure Shores', 'Black Coffee' and 'Never Ever', they got the crowd suitably warmed-up for the main event."[80]

Credits and personnel[edit]

Recording
  • Recorded at Guerilla Beach Studios, Los Angeles; Sarm West Studios, London; Larrabee West, Los Angeles; Olympic Studios, London.
Personnel

Credits adapted from the liner notes of "Black Coffee," London Records, UK.[4]

Track listings and formats[edit]

Charts[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Bouwman, Kimbel (26 September 2001). "Interview with Tom Nichols, songwriter/ producer for All Saints, A1, Kylie Minogue". HitQuarters. Archived from the original on 30 March 2014. Retrieved 30 March 2014. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s Hodge, Gavanndra (11 August 2010). "The ballad of the billionaire". London Evening Standard (Evening Standard Limited, Daily Mail and General Trust). Archived from the original on 30 March 2014. Retrieved 30 March 2014. 
  3. ^ a b Anon. (18 March 2013). "Kirsty Bertarelli and Ronan Keating music Video Premiere". Pressparty (Republic Media). Archived from the original on 30 March 2014. Retrieved 30 March 2014. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Black Coffee (CD liner). All Saints. UK: London Records.  Barcode: 6 85738 50372 8, Matrix / Runout: LOCDP 454 01 DISCTRONICS, Mastering SID Code: IFPI L502, Mould SID Code: IFPI 8708, Rights Society: GEMA/BIEM (Europe) GEMA/MCPS (UK), Label Code: LC02275 Other (Distribution Code): EW773
  5. ^ a b c d e Appleton 2002, p. 248
  6. ^ a b Appleton 2002, p. 235
  7. ^ Appleton 2002, p. 249
  8. ^ Anon. (14 August 2000). "Saints Alive". NME (IPC Media). Archived from the original on 4 April 2014. Retrieved 4 April 2014. 
  9. ^ a b c Black Coffee (UK cassette liner notes). All Saints. London Records. 2000. 8573 85026 4, LONCS454. 
  10. ^ a b Black Coffee (AUS CD single liner notes). All Saints. Warner Music Australasia. 2000. 8573852072. 
  11. ^ a b Black Coffee (UK 12" The Remixes liner notes). All Saints. London Records. 2000. LONX454. 
  12. ^ Daddy O (CD liner). Wideboys featuring Shaznay Lewis. UK: All Around The World.  CDGLOBE863
  13. ^ All Hits (CD liner). All Saints. UK: London Records.  0927 42151 2, LC00253
  14. ^ a b Pure Shores: The Very Best of All Saints (CD liner). All Saints. UK: Music Club Deluxe, Rhino Records.  5014797675032, MCDLX503
  15. ^ a b Burman, Rob (20 February 2007). "SingStar Goes Top of the Pops". IGN (IGN Entertainment). Archived from the original on 2 April 2014. Retrieved 2 April 2014. 
  16. ^ a b c O'Brien, Jon (27 September 2010). "Pure Shores: The Very Best of All Saints - All Saints". AllMusic (All Media Network, LLC). Archived from the original on 26 March 2014. Retrieved 26 March 2014. 
  17. ^ a b c Evans, Simon (28 October 2000). "Pop CD Of The Week". The Birmingham Post (Trinity Mirror). Retrieved 26 March 2014. 
  18. ^ a b McCabe, Kathy (28 December 2006). "Latter-day saints". Herald Sun (The Herald and Weekly Times). Archived from the original on 26 March 2014. Retrieved 26 March 2014. 
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References[edit]

External links[edit]