Black rose (symbolism)

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The anarchist symbol of the black rose

Black roses are often featured in fiction with many different meanings and titles such as black velvet rose black magic, barkarole, black beauty Tuscany superb, black jade, and baccara varieties of roses. The flowers commonly called black roses are actually a very dark shade of red, purple, or maroon. The color of a rose may be deepened by placing a dark rose in a vase of water mixed with black ink. Other black roses may be blackened by other methods such as burning.

Political[edit]

Anarchism[edit]

The black rose is a rarely used symbol of the anarchist movement.

Black Rose Books is the name of the Montreal anarchist publisher and small press imprint headed by the libertarian-municipalist/anarchist Dimitrios Roussopoulos. One of the two anarchist bookshops in Sydney is Black Rose Books which has existed in various guises since 1982.

Black Rose was the title of a respected journal of anarchist ideas published in the Boston area during the 1970s, as well as the name of an anarchist lecture series addressed by notable anarchist and libertarian socialists (including Murray Bookchin and Noam Chomsky) into the 1990s.

Anime[edit]

In the anime series Revolutionary Girl Utena, which is heavily concerned with the symbolism of roses, the black rose represents the dark side of a person's soul. The Black Rose Duelists are the friends of the series' protagonists who have been turned against them by their ignorance, selfish desires and passions that were carefully amplified by a mastermind psychologist, a student named Souji Mikage.

In the anime series Ranma ½, Kodachi Kuno, sister of Tatewaki Kuno, is nicknamed 'Black Rose'. She is an arrogant, childish, cunning, and occasionally psychotic young girl who often has black rose petals trailing behind her as she leaps.

In the anime/manga series .Hack, one of the female characters is named BlackRose. She is a video game avatar (visual representation) of a human girl (Akira Hayami) in the game The World.

In the anime series Detective School Q, also known as Tantei Gakuen Q, Anubis, top member of pluto, a crime organization which acts as a "murder designer", explained to Ryu, student of DDS Class Q the meaning of 'Black Rose'. According to him, 'Black Rose' means 'You are forever mine'. You can watch it in Episode 39 between 19:06 - 19:15.

Lastly, in the anime series, Yu-gi-oh! 5Ds one of the main characters, Izayoi Aki is known as The Black Rose or The Black Rose Witch. Her strongest duel monster is also known as The Black Rose Dragon; which has the appearance of a black draconian monster with dark magenta-colored rosé petals as wings.

Books and Other Media[edit]

In the Vampire Diaries, the black rose is referred to black magic, the only human drink and wine accessible for vampires to drink. Its taste is the same as the taste of blood. Many of the main characters use this to survive. It also has the same effects as any drug.

In the Night World series, the black rose is the symbol for made vampires, as opposed to the black iris for lamia (or born vampires).

In Revenge (Season 2, Episode 18), black roses are a symbol for dying love.

According to the soundtrack released by Nintendo Power, "The Black Rose" is the title for the background music in the 5th level of Eternal Darkness: Sanity's Requiem.

In Phantom of the Opera it symbolizes extreme and undying love.

In "Babylon 5" episode 'Passing Through Gethsemane' a black rose was given to a monk as a symbol of death, and later placed in the mouth of a murdered woman.

In "[Splitsvilla 7 - Episode 1 GRAND PREMIERE - EXCLUSIVE With Elixirs & Black Roses]" Black Roses given to eliminate girls from the show & It shows the exit.

Black Roses was featured on British pop singer Charli XCX's second studio album True Romance.

Black Rose: A Rock Legend was a 1979 album by Thin Lizzy.

References[edit]

  • Wilkins, Eithne. The rose-garden game; a tradition of beads and flowers, [New York] Herder and Herder, 1969.

External links[edit]