Blackfoot, Idaho

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Blackfoot, Idaho
City
Business District of Blackfoot
Business District of Blackfoot
Location of Blackfoot, Idaho
Location of Blackfoot, Idaho
Coordinates: 43°11′24″N 112°20′46″W / 43.19000°N 112.34611°W / 43.19000; -112.34611Coordinates: 43°11′24″N 112°20′46″W / 43.19000°N 112.34611°W / 43.19000; -112.34611
Country United States
State Idaho
County Bingham
Government
 • Mayor Mike Virtue
Area[1]
 • Total 6.07 sq mi (15.72 km2)
 • Land 5.83 sq mi (15.10 km2)
 • Water 0.24 sq mi (0.62 km2)
Elevation 4,498 ft (1,371 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 11,899
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 11,852
 • Density 2,041.0/sq mi (788.0/km2)
Time zone Mountain (MST) (UTC-7)
 • Summer (DST) MDT (UTC-6)
ZIP code 83221
Area code(s) 208
FIPS code 16-07840
GNIS feature ID 0396141
Website cityofblackfoot.org

Blackfoot is a city in Bingham County, Idaho, United States. The population was 11,899 at the 2010 census. The city is the county seat of Bingham County.[4] Blackfoot is the "Potato Capital of the World", because it has the largest potato industry in the world.[5] It is the site of the Idaho Potato Museum (a museum and gift shop that displays and explains the history of Idaho's potato industry), which has to the world's largest baked potato and potato chip. Blackfoot is also the location of the Eastern Idaho State Fair, which operates between Labor Day weekend and the following weekend.

Blackfoot is the principal city of the Blackfoot, Idaho, Micropolitan Statistical Area, which includes Bingham County.

History[edit]

Early settlers plow the road for Main Street

The first general store was built in 1874 by Fredrick S. Stevens and Major Danilson after learning that a railroad was to be built in the area. They were hoping that a station would be built there because it was just outside the Fort Hall Indian Reservation, which speculation paid off four years later. On October 10, 1878, a post office was established with Theo T. Danilson as Postmaster. On November 10, 1878, track was laid through town, with the track running right up behind the Stevens Store to take advantage of the store's loading platform (which was originally used to unload freight wagons). Originally called Grove City,[citation needed] the name of the town was changed to Blackfoot on March 20, 1879.

On January 13, 1885, Bingham County was established with Blackfoot as its county seat. Originally, the county seat was to be Eagle Rock (now called Idaho Falls). However, on the night before its legal appointment, men from Blackfoot bribed a clerk to erase Eagle Rock and write in Blackfoot. The measure went through without opposition and was signed by the governor.[6]

Blackfoot was incorporated as a town in 1907.

Geography[edit]

Blackfoot is located at 43°11′24″N 112°20′46″W / 43.19000°N 112.34611°W / 43.19000; -112.34611 (43.190068, -112.346037).[7]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 6.07 square miles (15.72 km2), of which 5.83 square miles (15.10 km2) is land and 0.24 square miles (0.62 km2) is water.[1]

Blackfoot has a semi-arid climate (Köppen BSk) with cold winters and hot, dry summers.

Climate data for Blackfoot, Idaho
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 60
(16)
66
(19)
77
(25)
85
(29)
96
(36)
100
(38)
102
(39)
104
(40)
98
(37)
88
(31)
74
(23)
69
(21)
104
(40)
Average high °F (°C) 30.5
(−0.8)
37.4
(3)
48.7
(9.3)
59.0
(15)
67.8
(19.9)
77.3
(25.2)
85.0
(29.4)
84.8
(29.3)
74.8
(23.8)
61.9
(16.6)
43.9
(6.6)
32.0
(0)
58.59
(14.78)
Average low °F (°C) 14.0
(−10)
18.6
(−7.4)
25.5
(−3.6)
31.4
(−0.3)
38.5
(3.6)
44.9
(7.2)
50.0
(10)
48.7
(9.3)
40.5
(4.7)
31.6
(−0.2)
22.9
(−5.1)
14.2
(−9.9)
31.73
(−0.14)
Record low °F (°C) −33
(−36)
−35
(−37)
−13
(−25)
11
(−12)
17
(−8)
28
(−2)
34
(1)
28
(−2)
20
(−7)
12
(−11)
−16
(−27)
−29
(−34)
−35
(−37)
Precipitation inches (mm) 0.86
(21.8)
0.73
(18.5)
0.89
(22.6)
0.93
(23.6)
1.33
(33.8)
0.87
(22.1)
0.53
(13.5)
0.45
(11.4)
0.70
(17.8)
0.84
(21.3)
0.81
(20.6)
0.75
(19)
9.69
(246)
Source #1: NOAA (normals, 1971–2000) [8]
Source #2: The Weather Channel (Records) [9]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 285
1890 538 88.8%
1900 1,000 85.9%
1910 2,202 120.2%
1920 3,937 78.8%
1930 3,199 −18.7%
1940 3,681 15.1%
1950 5,780 57.0%
1960 7,378 27.6%
1970 8,716 18.1%
1980 10,065 15.5%
1990 9,646 −4.2%
2000 10,419 8.0%
2010 11,899 14.2%
source:[10]

2010 census[edit]

At the 2010 census,[2] there were 11,899 people, 4,229 households and 2,958 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,041.0 inhabitants per square mile (788.0 /km2). There were 4,547 housing units at an average density of 779.9 per square mile (301.1 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 83.1% White, 0.3% African American, 3.5% Native American, 1.1% Asian, 0.2% Pacific Islander, 9.1% from other races, and 2.8% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 18.4% of the population.

There were 4,229 households of which 39.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.4% were married couples living together, 13.0% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.6% had a male householder with no wife present, and 30.1% were non-families. 25.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.74 and the average family size was 3.31.

The median age in the city was 30.8 years. 31.3% of residents were under the age of 18; 9.6% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 25.5% were from 25 to 44; 20.8% were from 45 to 64; and 12.8% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 49.6% male and 50.4% female.

2000 census[edit]

At the 2000 census, there were 10,419 people, 3,685 households and 2,682 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,926.4 per square mile (743.6/km²). There were 3,929 housing units at an average density of 726.4 per square mile (280.4/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 86.76% White, 0.21% African American, 2.51% Native American, 1.09% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 6.33% from other races, and 3.06% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 13.17% of the population.

There were 3,685 households of which 38.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.9% were married couples living together, 11.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.2% were non-families. 23.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.75 and the average family size was 3.27.

31.2% of the population were under the age of 18, 10.9% from 18 to 24, 25.5% from 25 to 44, 18.9% from 45 to 64, and 13.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31 years. For every 100 females there were 96.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.3 males.

The median household income was $33,004 and the median family income was $36,553. Males had a median income of $31,489 compared with $20,625 for females. The per capita income for the city was $15,529 About 11.5% of families and 14.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 22.4% of those under age 18 and 5.7% of those age 65 or over.

Education[edit]

Blackfoot is served by the Blackfoot School District #55 [11] and the Snake River School District #52.[12]

High schools:

Middle schools:

  • Mountain View Middle School[16]
  • Idaho Science And Technology Charter School
  • Snake River Junior High School [17]
  • Snake River Middle School [18]

Elementary schools:

  • Blackfoot Sixth Grade School[19]
  • Fort Hall Elementary School[20]
  • Groveland Elementary School
  • Ridgecrest Elementary School
  • Donald D. Stalker Elementary School
  • I.T. Stoddard Elementary School
  • Wapello Elementary School[21]
  • Blackfoot Charter Community Learning Center
  • Rockford Elementary [22]
  • Moreland Elementary [23]

Popular culture references[edit]

Blackfoot is mentioned in the song "When Cowboys Didn't Dance" by Lonestar as the destination of a cattle drive.

References[edit]

External links[edit]