Blackwood, New Jersey

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Blackwood, New Jersey
Census-designated place
Map of Blackwood CDP in Camden County. Inset: Location of Camden County within New Jersey.
Map of Blackwood CDP in Camden County. Inset: Location of Camden County within New Jersey.
Coordinates: 39°47′57″N 75°03′47″W / 39.799065°N 75.063111°W / 39.799065; -75.063111Coordinates: 39°47′57″N 75°03′47″W / 39.799065°N 75.063111°W / 39.799065; -75.063111[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Camden
Township Gloucester
Area[2]
 • Total 1.235 sq mi (3.199 km2)
 • Land 1.226 sq mi (3.176 km2)
 • Water 0.009 sq mi (0.023 km2)  0.72%
Elevation[3] 46 ft (14 m)
Population (2010 Census)[4]
 • Total 4,545
 • Density 3,706.4/sq mi (1,431.0/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08012[5]
Area code(s) 856
FIPS code 3406040[6][2][7]
GNIS feature ID 02389213[8][2]

Blackwood is a census-designated place (CDP) and unincorporated community located within Gloucester Township, in Camden County, New Jersey, United States.[9][10][11] As of the 2010 United States Census, the CDP's population was 4,545.[4] It is located 10 miles (16 km) from the city of Camden and 14.6 miles (23.5 km) away from Philadelphia.

Blackwood is the home of the main campus of Camden County College, in addition to other campus locations in Camden and Cherry Hill.[12]

Geography[edit]

Blackwood is located at 39°47′57″N 75°03′47″W / 39.799065°N 75.063111°W / 39.799065; -75.063111 (39.799065,-75.063111). According to the United States Census Bureau, Blackwood had a total area of 1.235 square miles (3.199 km2), of which, 1.226 square miles (3.176 km2) of it is land and 0.009 square miles (0.023 km2) of it (0.72%) is water.[1][2] Bodies of water include Blackwood Lake and Farrows Run stream.

Parks[edit]

  • Gloucester Township Health and Fitness Trail (formerly known as the Blackwood Railroad Trail) [13][14]
  • Kiwanis's Baseball Fields (Marshall & Railroad Ave) [14][15]
  • Al Raw's Field (Lincoln Drive)[14][16]
  • Harwan Park (Black Horse Pike) [14]
  • State Street Park[14]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1980 5,219
1990 5,120 −1.9%
2000 4,692 −8.4%
2010 4,545 −3.1%
Population sources: 1980[17]
1990-2010[11] 2000[18] 2010[4]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 4,545 people, 1,687 households, and 1,210 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 3,706.4 per square mile (1,431.0 /km2). There were 1,800 housing units at an average density of 1,467.9 per square mile (566.8 /km2). The racial makeup of the CDP was 88.71% (4,032) White, 5.21% (237) Black or African American, 0.04% (2) Native American, 2.53% (115) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 1.63% (74) from other races, and 1.87% (85) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 5.94% (270) of the population.[4]

There were 1,687 households, of which 29.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.2% were married couples living together, 13.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.3% were non-families. 23.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.69 and the average family size was 3.19.[4]

In the CDP, 22.4% of the population were under the age of 18, 8.5% from 18 to 24, 26.8% from 25 to 44, 27.8% from 45 to 64, and 14.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40.2 years. For every 100 females there were 98.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.1 males.[4]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[6] there were 4,692 people, 1,721 households, and 1,261 families residing in the section. The population density was 1,461.0/km2 (3,782.1/mi2). There were 1,840 housing units at an average density of 572.9/km2 (1,483.2/mi2). The racial makeup of the section was 91.30% White, 3.94% African American, 0.11% Native American, 2.11% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 1.19% from other races, and 1.28% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.15% of the population.[18]

There were 1,721 households out of which 32.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.8% were married couples living together, 12.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.7% were non-families. 22.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.68 and the average family size was 3.16.[18]

In the section the population was spread out with 24.1% under the age of 18, 7.7% from 18 to 24, 30.3% from 25 to 44, 22.1% from 45 to 64, and 15.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 98.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.7 males.[18]

The median income for a household in the section was $49,707, and the median income for a family was $60,136. Males had a median income of $41,274 versus $30,677 for females. The per capita income for the section was $21,815. About 0.9% of families and 4.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.6% of those under age 18 and 6.0% of those age 65 or over.[18]

History[edit]

Blackwood, originally known as Blackwoodtown, was settled about 1750 by John Blackwood in an area then known as "head of Timber Creek." Blackwood was a fuller who immigrated from Scotland and established mills in Blackwoodtown.[19] The area was a crossroads village along the Black Horse Pike well into the nineteenth century, that served as a local government and transportation center by the 1830s, when Uriah Norcross established a stage coach line between Camden and Woodbury with a stop at a tavern in Blackwoodtown. The arrival of the railroad in 1891 led to further development.[20] [21]

External images
"At Blackwoodtown, N.J.", 1851, courtesy of Library of Congress[22]

In 1891 Blackwood Lake began operating as a summer resort until 1932.[23]

The Blackwood Historic District (roughly covering the area along Church Street from East Railroad Avenue to Indiana Avenue, Black Horse Pike, and Central Avenue) and Solomon Wesley United Methodist Church are listed in the properties and districts on the National Register of Historic Places. [24] [25]

Education[edit]

Public schools, that are part of the Gloucester Township Public Schools district, include Blackwood Elementary School, Gloucester Township Elementary School, as well as Charles W. Lewis Middle School. Highland Regional High School is part of the Black Horse Pike Regional School District.

The Kingdom Charter School of Leadership is a charter school that serves students in Kindergarten through sixth grade residing in Gloucester Township, who are accepted by lottery on a space-available basis.[26]

Our Lady of Hope Regional School is a Roman Catholic elementary school that operates under the auspices of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Camden.[27] Our Lady of Hope Regional School was previously named St. Jude Regional School but was renamed as part of a merger with St. Agnes School.

Higher education in Blackwood includes Pennco Tech and Camden County College.

Notable people[edit]

Notable current and former residents of Blackwood include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 13, 2013.
  3. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Blackwood Census Designated Place, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed October 15, 2012.
  4. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Blackwood CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 15, 2012.
  5. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Blackwood, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed October 15, 2012.
  6. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  7. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed June 18, 2013.
  8. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  9. ^ GCT-PH1 - Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County -- County Subdivision and Place from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 19, 2013.
  10. ^ 2006-2010 American Community Survey Geography for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 19, 2013.
  11. ^ a b New Jersey: 2010 - Population and Housing Unit Counts - 2010 Census of Population and Housing (CPH-2-32), United States Census Bureau, p. III-5, August 2012. Accessed June 19, 2013.
  12. ^ Camden County College, Camden County College. Accessed October 15, 2012. "Camden County College is one of the largest, most comprehensive community colleges in New Jersey and the surrounding region and is a vital resource for transfer education, workforce training and cultural event. Its three distinct campuses in Blackwood, Camden and Cherry Hill – along with its satellite locations in Lakeland, Sicklerville and elsewhere throughout the County – share the common mission of providing accessible, affordable higher education and occupational study to all who can benefit."
  13. ^ Gloucester Township Health and Fitness Trail (aka Blackwood Railroad Trail), Trail Link
  14. ^ a b c d e Parks & Playgrounds, Gloucester Township
  15. ^ [1] Field Directions: BKLL Fields, Blackwood Kiwanis Little League
  16. ^ [2] Field Directions: Al Raws Field, Blackwood Kiwanis Little League
  17. ^ Staff. 1980 Census of Population: Number of Inhabitants United States Summary, p. 1-141. United States Census Bureau, June 1983. Accessed June 19, 2013.
  18. ^ a b c d e DP-1 - Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 from the Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Blackwood CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 15, 2012.
  19. ^ The book of John Howell & his descendants, by Frances Howell
  20. ^ New Jersey Postal History Society
  21. ^ Blackwood Historic District, Living Places
  22. ^ At Blackwoodtown, N.J., Library of Congress
  23. ^ Gloucester Township: A history with hosiery, Courier Post
  24. ^ National Register of Historic Places listings in Camden County, New Jersey
  25. ^ National Register of Historic Places
  26. ^ Enrollment, The Kingdom Charter School of Leadership. Accessed March 19, 2014.
  27. ^ Camden County Schools, Roman Catholic Diocese of Camden. Accessed July 10, 2008.
  28. ^ Jersey Bakley, Baseball-Reference.com. Accessed March 19, 2014.
  29. ^ Sipress, Alan. "Each Party Sees Chance To Seize Florio's Seat", The Philadelphia Inquirer, May 30, 1990. Accessed July 20, 2011. "Also seeking the Democratic nomination is John A. Dramesi, 57, of Blackwood. A former prisoner of war in Vietnam, Dramesi said he was asked to run by senior citizens and fellow veterans."
  30. ^ Assembly Member David R. Mayer, Project Vote Smart. Accessed August 8, 2007.
  31. ^ http://www.philly.com/philly/news/new_jersey/Sculptor_Joseph_Menna_carves_heroes_villains_from_virtual_clay.html
  32. ^ Staff. "Some background on Joe Vitt, interim coach of the New Orleans Saints", The Times-Picayune, April 12, 2012. Accessed November 20, 2012. "Vitt, 57, was born in Syracuse, N.Y., and grew up in Blackwood, N.J."