Blewcoat School

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Blewcoat School
BlewCoatSchool.jpg
Blewcoat School, May 2008
Type 1709 poor school
Proprietor National Trust
Managed by English Heritage
Main feature Gift shop
Other features Information point
Public access Yes
Museum No
Region Greater London
Address Caxton Street, Westminster
Postcode SW1
Refreshments No
Parking Paid, on street
Shop Yes
Website NT Blewcoat School
51°29′54.3″N 0°8′9.9″W / 51.498417°N 0.136083°W / 51.498417; -0.136083Coordinates: 51°29′54.3″N 0°8′9.9″W / 51.498417°N 0.136083°W / 51.498417; -0.136083
Blewcoat School
Established c.1688
Closed 1926
Type Charity school
Founders 35 inhabitants of the Parish of St. Margaret West[1]
Location Caxton Street
Westminster
England
Students ca. 50 (ca. 1700)[1]
Gender 1688-1714 boys
1714-ca. 1876 boys and girls
ca. 1876 onwards boys

Blewcoat School, located in Caxton Street, Westminster, London, England, was built in 1709 as a school for the poor. It was used as a school until 1926. In 1954, it was purchased by the National Trust who used it as a gift shop and information centre. As of 2013, the site has been vacated.

Opening times[edit]

The shop was open all year from 10am to 5:30pm on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday. The shop was open from 6 November to 18 December from 10am to 4pm on Saturday only. As of 2013, the shop is closed and the site is vacant.

School[edit]

The school was founded in Duck Lane in about 1688 by voluntary subscription as a charity school for the education of poor boys to teach them reading, writing, religion, and trades. It moved to purpose-built premises in Caxton Street. From 1714 to about 1876, it also admitted girls. In 1899, it was agreed that the school should move to a site that had been owned by the Christ Church National Schools Trust, and the Caxton Street site was then used for an elementary school.[1] The school closed in 1926.[2]

Later uses[edit]

During World War II, the building was used by the American services as a store. Afterwards, the Girl Guides used it as a youth club. When the National Trust bought it in 1954, it was used as their membership and head office. Later, it was converted into a gift shop.[2][3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Cox, Montague H. (1926). "Blue Coat School". Survey of London: volume 10: St. Margaret, Westminster, part I: Queen Anne’s Gate area (1926), pp. 144-147. British History Online. Retrieved 21 April 2011. 
  2. ^ a b Provençal, Nina (February 2011). "Business of the Month: January and February 2011 - The National Trust Shop". Business of the Month. Victoria Business Improvement District. Retrieved 21 April 2011. 
  3. ^ Tye, Timothy. "Blewcoat School, London". Historical Buildings in London. Timothy Tye. Retrieved 21 April 2011. 

External links[edit]