Blewcoat School

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The Blewcoat
BlewCoatSchool.jpg
Blewcoat School, May 2008
General information
Type School
Location Caxton Street, Westminster, London
Country England
Coordinates 51°29′54.3″N 0°8′9.9″W / 51.498417°N 0.136083°W / 51.498417; -0.136083Coordinates: 51°29′54.3″N 0°8′9.9″W / 51.498417°N 0.136083°W / 51.498417; -0.136083
Current tenants Ian Stuart Bride
Construction started 1709 (1709)

The Blewcoat, located in Caxton Street, Westminster, London, England, was built in 1709 as a school for the poor. It was used as a school until 1926. In 1954, it was purchased by the National Trust who used it as a gift shop and information centre. In 2013 Ian Stuart was granted permission to refurbish the interior to house his bridal gowns, special occasion wear & evening gown collections

Opening times[edit]

The Blewcoat is open from 10am to 6pm, Monday to Saturday.

School[edit]

The school was founded in Duck Lane in about 1688 by voluntary subscription as a charity school for the education of poor boys to teach them reading, writing, religion, and trades. It moved to purpose-built premises in Caxton Street. From 1714 to about 1876, it also admitted girls. In 1899, it was agreed that the school should move to a site that had been owned by the Christ Church National Schools Trust, and the Caxton Street site was then used for an elementary school.[1] The school closed in 1926.[2]

Later Uses[edit]

During World War II, the building was used by the American services as a store. Afterwards, the Girl Guides used it as a youth club. When the National Trust bought it in 1954, it was used as their membership and head office. Later, it was converted into a gift shop.[2][3]

Ian Stuart[edit]

June 2014 saw the opening of renowned/award winning British designer Ian Stuart’s exclusive boutique. An incredible destination and shopping experience for anyone looking for a unique luxury gown. Ian Stuart showcases his evening wear, special occasion wear and up-scale bridal wear. You will be captured by the elegance and style of this Grade 1 listed building gently nestling between the high rise buildings of London’s Victoria.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Cox, Montague H. (1926). "Blue Coat School". Survey of London: volume 10: St. Margaret, Westminster, part I: Queen Anne’s Gate area (1926), pp. 144-147. British History Online. Retrieved 21 April 2011. 
  2. ^ a b Provençal, Nina (February 2011). "Business of the Month: January and February 2011 - The National Trust Shop". Business of the Month. Victoria Business Improvement District. Retrieved 21 April 2011. 
  3. ^ Tye, Timothy. "Blewcoat School, London". Historical Buildings in London. Timothy Tye. Retrieved 21 April 2011.