Serum (blood)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Blood serum)
Jump to: navigation, search
Preparation of serum cups for a lipids panel designed to test cholesterol levels in a patient’s blood

In blood, the serum (/ˈsɪərəm/ or /ˈsɪrəm/) is the component that is neither a blood cell (serum does not contain white or red blood cells) nor a clotting factor; it is the blood plasma not including the fibrinogens. Serum includes all proteins not used in blood clotting (coagulation) and all the electrolytes, antibodies, antigens, hormones, and any exogenous substances (e.g., drugs and microorganisms).

A study of serum is serology, and may also include proteomics. Serum is used in numerous diagnostic tests, as well as blood typing.

Blood is centrifuged to remove cellular components. Anti-coagulated blood yields plasma containing fibrinogen and clotting factors. Coagulated blood (clotted blood) yields serum without fibrinogen, although some clotting factors remain.

Serum is an essential factor for the self-renewal of embryonic stem cells in combination with the cytokine leukemia inhibitory factor.

The serum of convalescent patients successfully recovering (or already recovered) from an infectious disease can be used as a biopharmaceutical in the treatment of other people with that disease, because the antibodies generated by the successful recovery are potent fighters of the pathogen. Such convalescent serum (antiserum) is a form of immunotherapy.

Usage note[edit]

Like many other mass nouns, the word serum can be pluralized when used in certain senses. To speak of multiple serum specimens from multiple people (each with a unique population of antibodies), physicians sometimes speak of sera (an irregular plural, as opposed to *serums).

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]