Blue Moon (The Marcels album)

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Blue Moon
Studio album by The Marcels
Released July 1961
Recorded 1961
Genre Rock and roll
Label Colpix
Producer Stu Phillips
The Marcels chronology
Blue Moon
(1961)
That Old Black Magic And 12 Other Great Songs
(1963)
Singles from Blue Moon
  1. "Blue Moon"
    Released: February 1961

Blue Moon is the debut studio album by the doo-wop group The Marcels. It was released in 1961 on Colpix Records and included 12 songs. The album was available in mono, catalogue number CP-416. Blue Moon was produced and arranged by Stu Phillips and was recorded in New York at RCA Studios. Blue Moon features a cover version of the Judy Garland hit "Over The Rainbow". Four decades after the group's debut album was released, The Marcels were inducted into the Vocal Group Hall of Fame.[1]

Reception[edit]

Although the album Blue Moon failed to chart on the Billboard albums chart, the first single "Blue Moon" did well. The single charted at No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for three weeks,[2] charted at No. 1 on the UK Singles Chart,[3] sold one million copies and the group was awarded a gold disc.[4]

Track listing[edit]

Side One

No. Title Length
1. "Blue Moon"   2:17
2. "Goodbye To Love"   2:35
3. "Sweet Was The Wine"   2:10
4. "Peace Of Mind"   2:34
5. "A Fallen Tear"   2:39
6. "Over The Rainbow"   2:40

Side Two

No. Title Length
7. "I'll Be Forever Loving You"   2:21
8. "Two People In The World"   2:22
9. "Most Of All"   2:12
10. "Teeter Totter Love"   2:02
11. "Sunday Kind Of Love"   2:22
12. "Crazy Bells"   2:21

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Marcels - Inductees - The Vocal Group Hall of Fame Foundation". Vocalgroup.org. Retrieved 2011-10-13. 
  2. ^ Bronson, Fred (2003). The Billboard Book of Number One Hits: The Inside Story Behind Every Number One Single on Billboard's Hot 100 from 1955 to the Present (5 ed.). Billboard Books. p. 87. ISBN 0-8230-7677-6. 
  3. ^ "Marcels - Blue Moon". Chart Stats. 1961-04-15. Retrieved 2011-10-13. 
  4. ^ Murrells, Joseph (1978). The Book of Golden Discs (2nd ed.). London: Barrie and Jenkins Ltd. p. 137. ISBN 0-214-20512-6.