Blurry

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For other uses, see Blur.
"Blurry"
Single by Puddle of Mudd
from the album Come Clean
Released October 30, 2001 (2001-10-30)
Format CD single
Genre Post-grunge, alternative rock
Length 5:04 (album version)
4:17 (radio/video version)
Label Flawless/Geffen Records
Writer(s) Wes Scantlin, Doug Ardito, Jimmy Allen
Puddle of Mudd singles chronology
"Control"
(2001)
"Blurry"
(2001)
"Drift & Die"
(2002)
Music video
"Blurry" on YouTube

"Blurry" is a song by American alternative group Puddle of Mudd. It was released in October 2001 as the second single from the album Come Clean.

The song is the band's best known song, reaching the number-one spot on the Billboard Hot Mainstream Rock Tracks and Hot Modern Rock Tracks charts for ten and nine weeks, respectively. This soon propelled the single to mainstream success, reaching the number 5 spot on the Billboard Hot 100 Airplay[1] and Billboard Hot 100.[2] The song is also the band's highest selling U.S. single ever, with sales of 753,000 copies, as of 2010.[3] Additionally, the song's writers, Wes Scantlin, Doug Ardito, and Jimmy Allen won ASCAP (American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers) Song of the Year and Pop Song of the Year for this tune.[4] "Blurry" also won 2 billboard awards in 2002, for "modern rock track of the year" and "rock track of the year". It also received the Kerrang! Award for Best Single. "Blurry" reached #8 in the UK Singles Chart on its release there in June 2002, becoming the band's highest charting single in the United Kingdom.

Content[edit]

"Blurry" is about a break-up, as well as cowardice. The song was primarily written about how lead singer Wes Scantlin misses his real-life son, Jordan, which is also played by him.

It is best known for its refrain, from which it derived its secondary name: "Can you take it all away? / Can you take it all away? / When you shoved it in my face / This pain you gave to me". Guitar One magazine named Doug Ardito's "Blurry" guitar harmonic riff as one of its "Top Ten Riffs of the Decade".

Single[edit]

Track Listings[edit]

Promo Single[5]
No. Title Length
1. "Blurry (Radio Edit)" (Scantlin) 4:20
2. "Blurry (Album Version)"   5:06
3. "Blurry (Video)" (Directed By Fred Durst) 4:16
Enhanced Single[6]
No. Title Length
1. "Blurry (Album Version)"   5:06
2. "All I Ask For" (Scantlin, from Abrasive Album) 4:55
3. "Nobody Told Me (Album Version)" (Scantlin) 5:23
4. "Blurry (Video)" (Directed By Fred Durst) 4:16

Music video[edit]

The music video for the song shows Scantlin playing with his son, Jordan, interspersed with shots of the band playing in a garage. Towards the end, as the song picks up, it shows Jordan driving off in the back seat with a man and a woman in the front seat (presumably Jordan's mother and stepfather), as Wes watches the car sadly. The video was directed by Limp Bizkit frontman Fred Durst.

Chart performance[edit]

Chart (2001–2002) Peak
position
France (SNEP)[7] 74
Germany (Media Control Charts)[8] 44
Ireland (IRMA)[9] 18
Netherlands (Single Top 100)[10] 98
New Zealand (Recorded Music NZ)[11] 9
Switzerland (Schweizer Hitparade)[12] 72
UK Singles Chart[13] 8
U.S. Billboard Hot 100 5
U.S. Billboard Mainstream Rock Tracks 1
U.S. Billboard Modern Rock Tracks 1
U.S. Billboard Mainstream Top 40[14] 3
U.S. Billboard Adult Top 40 Tracks[14] 6
U.S. Billboard Top 40 Tracks[14] 6

Year-end charts[edit]

Chart (2002) Position
U.S. Billboard Hot 100 10

Chart successions[edit]

Preceded by
"In the End" by Linkin Park
Billboard Modern Rock Tracks number-one single
January 26 - March 23, 2002
Succeeded by
"Youth of the Nation" by P.O.D.
Preceded by
"My Sacrifice" by Creed
Billboard Mainstream Rock Tracks number-one single
February 16 - April 20, 2002
Succeeded by
"Too Bad" by Nickelback

Uses[edit]

Accolades[edit]

Publication Country Accolade Year Rank
AOL Radio United States "Top Alternative Songs of the Decade - 2000s"[18] 2009 3

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Top 100 Music Hits, Top 100 Music Charts, Top 100 Songs & The Hot 100". Billboard.com. Retrieved 2011-08-20. 
  2. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2004). The Billboard Book of Top 40 Hits, 8th Edition (Billboard Publications), page 510.
  3. ^ "Chart Watch Extra: Top 20 Songs In Digital History - Chart Watch". New.music.yahoo.com. 2010-08-06. Retrieved 2011-08-20. 
  4. ^ ""Elvis Costello Receives Founders Award at 20th Annual Pop Music Awards" American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers Retrieved June 16, 2011". Ascap.com. Retrieved 2011-08-20. 
  5. ^ "Puddle of Mudd – 'Blurry'. Companies, credits, notes, barcode and all the versions released". Discogs. Retrieved 2013-07-22. 
  6. ^ "Puddle of Mudd – 'Blurry'. Companies, credits, notes, barcode and all the versions released". Discogs. Retrieved 2013-07-22. 
  7. ^ "Lescharts.com – Puddle of Mudd – Blurry" (in French). Les classement single.
  8. ^ "Die ganze Musik im Internet: Charts, News, Neuerscheinungen, Tickets, Genres, Genresuche, Genrelexikon, Künstler-Suche, Musik-Suche, Track-Suche, Ticket-Suche – musicline.de" (in German). Media Control Charts. PhonoNet GmbH.
  9. ^ "Irish Singles Chart – Search for song". Irish Recorded Music Association. Retrieved July 6, 2011. 
  10. ^ "Dutchcharts.nl – Puddle of Mudd – Blurry" (in Dutch). Single Top 100.
  11. ^ "Charts.org.nz – Puddle of Mudd – Blurry". Top 40 Singles.
  12. ^ "Puddle of Mudd – Blurry – swisscharts.com". Swiss Singles Chart.
  13. ^ "Official UK Charts Company: Puddle of Mudd". Official UK Charts Company. Retrieved 2013-07-22. 
  14. ^ a b c "'Come Clean' - Puddle of Mudd: Awards (Billboard Singles)". Allmusic. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved 2013-07-22. 
  15. ^ "Puddle of Mudd. Soundtrack. 'Blurry'". Internet Movie Database. Retrieved 2013-07-22. 
  16. ^ "Trailer of A Man Apart". YouTube. Retrieved 2013-07-22. 
  17. ^ "Blurry in Rock Band 3 DLC list". 
  18. ^ Dickinson, Boonsri (2009-12-07). "Top Alternative Songs of the Decade - 2000s - AOL Radio Blog". AOL Radio. Retrieved 2010-02-04. 

External links[edit]