Blyth and Tyneside Poems & Songs

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Blyth and Tyneside Poems & Songs
Author James Anderson
Country United Kingdom
Language English, many in (Geordie dialect)
Genre book
Publisher John 'Scribe' Fraser
Publication date
1898
Media type Print
Pages 126 pages

Details[edit]

Blyth and Tyneside Poems & Songs was a book, published in 1898. It contained well over 50 songs in its 126 pages.[1]

The full title of the book was “Blyth and Tyneside Poems & Songs by James Anderson, (Pay Friday,) Blyth; J. Fraser, Scribe Office, Blyth Price One Shilling” and was a collection of poems written by James Anderson and printed by J. Fraser, Scribe Office, Blyth

A copy of the book is now held at the Border History Museum in Hexham, Northumberland, England.

The publication[edit]

The front cover of the book is as thus :-

BLYTH AND TYNESIDE
POEMS & SONGS
BY
– - – - – -
JAMES ANDERSON,
(PAY FRIDAY,)
BLYTH
J. Fraser, Scribe Office, Blyth

The cost of the publication was One Shilling

Contents[edit]

The contents included the following songs, mainly written in the Geordie dialect, often very broad, all written by James Anderson, and listed here in alphabetical order-

  • Aa wunder what canny aad Blyth 'll say noo[2]
  • Another Song in answer to James Armstrong
  • At Heddon-on-the-Wall
  • Aud Billy Henderson's wonderful coat, to the tune of Cappy's, the Dog[3]
  • Aw wish pay Friday wad cum, to the tune of Aw wish yor muther wud cum (This song was awarded first prize in the Newcastle Weekly Chronicle song competition of 1870)[4]
  • Aw wish that time wad cum, to the tune of John Anderson, my Joe[5]
  • Aw'll buy ne mair butter o' Paddison's wife, to the tune of Laird o' Cockpen[6]
  • Aw'll nivor gan drinkin' i' Blyth onny mair, to the tune of Laird o' Cockpen[7]
  • Be kind te yer wife[8]
  • Blyth sailor's farewell, to the tune of Laird o' Cockpen[9]
  • Bonny banks of o' Tyne[10]
  • Bonny bright eyed Mary[11]
  • Bonny Throckley Fell
  • brightest gem on earth – (The)
  • Clocks at the Central Station – (The)
  • Four Seasons – (The)
  • Friendship’s Smile
  • Half the lees they tell isn't true[12]
  • High price o' coals; or, Peggy's lament[13]
  • Honest workin' man[14]
  • Jack an' Nan[15]
  • Jennie and Jemmie, a parody on the song 'When ye gang awa, Jemmie'[16]
  • John Bryson, the Miners' Best Friend
  • Last line – an' spent a jolly neet man
  • Late Mr James Bonner – (The)
  • Little favourite Pink Flower – (My)
  • Local Poet's Lament for Jos Chater – (The)
  • Man, know Thyself
  • Mary on the Banks of Tyne
  • Miseries of man[17]
  • Music
  • Northumberland miners' strike, 1876[18]
  • Residence in Blyth – (My)
  • Rural Retreat – (A)
  • Sally and Bobby, to the tune of Cappy's, the Dog[19]
  • Sally and Sam[20]
  • Smiling Face – (A)
  • Sweet Little Home by the Sea – (My)
  • Thor's queer folks noo o' days[21]
  • Toast – (A), On taking a friendly Glass of Beer (awarded first prize in a competition)[22]
  • Tortoise-shell tom cat[23]
  • Town of Old Hexham – (The)
  • True Manhood
  • Walbottle Dene, to the tune of John Anderson, my Joe
  • What did aw get married for?, to the tune of Green grows the rashes o[24]
  • What is Love
  • Wor Bonny Pit Lad

See also[edit]

Geordie dialect words
James Anderson

References[edit]

External links[edit]