Bob Armstrong (Texas politician)

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Robert Landis "Bob" Armstrong
24th Commissioner of the General Land Office
In office
January 5, 1971 – January 4, 1983
Governor Preston Smith (1971-1973)

Dolph Briscoe (1973-1979) Bill Clements (1979-1983)

Preceded by Jerry Sadler
Succeeded by Garry Mauro
Member of the Texas House of Representatives from District 82
In office
1963–1971
Succeeded by John Whitmire
Personal details
Born (1932-11-07) November 7, 1932 (age 82)
Political party Democratic
Spouse(s) Linda Lee Aaker Armstrong
Residence Austin, Texas
Alma mater University of Texas
Military service
Service/branch United States Navy
Years of service 1950-1953
Rank Ensign
Battles/wars Korean War

Robert Landis "Bob" Armstrong (born November 7, 1932) served as a Democratic member of the Texas House of Representatives from 1963 to 1970 Commissioner of the General Land Office from 1970 to 1982, and a member of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission from 1985 to 1991. He was appointed assistant secretary for Land and Minerals Management at the Department of Interior by U.S. President Bill Clinton from 1993 to 1998.

Early years[edit]

Bob Armstrong is the son of the late Robert C. Armstrong and the former Louise Landis. He married the former Linda Lee Aaker, an Austin lobbyist.[1]

He received his Bachelor of Arts from the University of Texas at Austin and his LL.B. from the University of Texas School of Law. While at UT, Armstrong was a member of the Texas Cowboys. He served during the Korean War as an ensign in the United States Navy.

Political career[edit]

In 1962, Bob Armstrong was elected to the Texas House of Representatives representing part of Travis County including Austin. He served in the capacity until 1970, when he was elected the Commissioner of the General Land Office. He was the Land Commissioner for twelve years until 1983.[2]

In 1982, Armstrong ran for the Democratic gubernatorial nomination against Texas Railroad Commissioner Buddy Temple and Attorney General Mark Wells White and lost, having finished third in the primary. White, named the party nominee, then unseated Republican Governor Bill Clements in the 1982 general election. In 1985, Governor White appointed Armstrong, his former opponent, to the Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission.

President Clinton nominated Armstrong to serve as Assistant Secretary for Land and Minerals Management at the U.S. Department of the Interior. Armstrong resigned that position in 1998.

Bob Armstrong dip[edit]

Armstrong holds a distinction in that he has a dip named after him. Matt's El Rancho restaurant in Austin named a concoction of queso, guacamole, taco meat, and other ingredients named a "Bob Armstrong."

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Paul Burka "Power", December 1987". Texas Monthly. Retrieved September 15, 2013. 
  2. ^ Mauro, Garry. The Land commissioners of Texas: 150 years of the General Land Office. Austin: Texas General Land Office, 1986.
Political offices
Texas House of Representatives
Preceded by
Member of the Texas House of Representatives
from District 82 (Austin)

1963–1971
Succeeded by
John Whitmire (redistricted)
Preceded by
Jerry Sadler
Commissioner of the General Land Office
1971–1983
Succeeded by
Garry Mauro
Preceded by
David C. O'Neal
Assistant Secretary of the Interior for Land and Minerals Management
1993–1998
Succeeded by
Sylvia Baca