Bob Casullo

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Bob Casullo
Sport(s) Football
Biographical details
Born (1951-03-21) March 21, 1951 (age 63)
Little Falls, NY
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1970–1973
1985–1994
1995–1998
1999
2000–2003
2004
2005
2007–2008
2009–2010
Brockport State (assistant)
Syracuse (assistant)
Georgia Tech (assistant)
Michigan State (assistant)
Oakland Raiders (ST)
New York Jets (TE)
Seattle Seahawks (ST)
Tampa Bay Buccaneers (TE)
Syracuse (assistant)

Bob Casullo (born March 21, 1951) is a journeyman NFL coach who most recently coached for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, having started his NFL career in 2000 coaching Special Teams for the Raiders. Casullo was most recently the Assistant Head Coach and Special Teams Coordinator for Syracuse University but left that position in November 2010, one week before the team's final regular season game. He is married with 2 boys who also coach football

Early life[edit]

Casullo attended Little Falls High School where he was a three-sport athlete for the Mounties. He was a captain for all three (football, basketball and baseball) teams. After starring at quarterback in high school, Casullo went on to a career as running back for Brockport State in New York, earning honorable mention All-America honors in his senior season.

Coaching career[edit]

Raiders[edit]

Though his career in the NFL started only a short time ago, he has distinguished himself as one of the league's better Special Teams coaches.[citation needed] His special teams unit helped the Raiders to three consecutive AFC West titles (2000–2002) including an appearance in Super Bowl XXXVII. In 2000, his unit led the whole of the NFL in net punting average. In 2001, they led the AFC sending their punter to the Pro Bowl. That year he also produced an outstanding kickoff coverage unit (best in the NFL), that kept opponents less than 20 yards from their own end zone 17 times. In his final year with the Raiders he produced a unit that was third in the NFL in punt return average.

Jets[edit]

During his 2004 season with the New York Jets as Tight Ends Coach, Curtis Martin won the NFL Rushing title (by 1 yard).

Seahawks[edit]

His first season with the Seahawks, in 2005, was rocky but not without success. The special teams were plagued by injuries and saw a rotation of injury replacements. Casullo had lost former Special Teams Pro Bowler Alex Bannister to another broken collar bone, and the other injuries to WRs, LBs and DB began to eat into his personnel. There were also miscues: several fumbles on kick and punt returns, some lost, notably at (certainly not in) the hands of Josh Scobey seemed to portend ill tidings. Blown coverages that allowed a kick return for a touchdown in St. Louis versus the hated Rams, and a punt return for a touchdown by Steve Smith in the NFC Championship game threatened to doom the Seahawks greatest season. But converted safety Jordan "Big Play Babs" Babineaux forced a fumble on special teams which was recovered by long snapper J. P. Darche to seal the victory in St. Louis. There was evidence of an illegal block in the back freeing Steve Smith for the punt returned for a TD, but the officials picked up the flag, surprising and elating the Carolina radio crew.[citation needed] Josh Brown, who provided his share of game-winning kicks, ultimately tied a franchise record of 8 50+ yard field goals and earned an invite as a Pro Bowl alternate.

Buccaneers[edit]

On January 19, 2007, Casullo was reunited with Coach John Gruden & hired as the tight ends coach for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, replacing the departing Ron Middleton. He joined the staff immediately and will be part of the coaching staff for the Senior Bowl.

Syracuse[edit]

On Friday, February 13, 2009, Syracuse University announced that Casullo had been hired as Syracuse University's assistant head coach for football.[1]

On November 22, 2010, Syracuse Head Coach Doug Marrone announced that Casullo was no longer a part of the coaching staff. Marrone gave no further explanation.

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1]