Bob Peck (American football)

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Bob Peck
PopandPeck1918Owl.jpg
Peck with head coach "Pop" Warner during the 1916 season. That year, Pitt outscored its opponents 255–25 along the way to an 8–0 record and a consensus National Championship.
Date of birth: (1891-05-30)May 30, 1891
Place of birth: Lock Haven, Pennsylvania, United States
Date of death: June 14, 1932(1932-06-14) (aged 41)
Place of death: Culver, Indiana, United States
Career information
Position(s): Center
College: Pittsburgh
Organizations
As athletic director:
1917-1932 Culver Military Academy
As player:
1917
1917
1920
Youngstown Patricians
Massillon Tigers
Fort Wayne Friars
Career highlights and awards

Bob Peck (May 30, 1891 – June 14, 1932) was an American football player who most famously played center for the Pittsburgh Panthers, where he was a three-time All-American. In 1917 he played in the Ohio League, the direct predecessor to the modern National Football League for the Youngstown Patricians and the Massillon Tigers. That season he earned first team all-pro honors.[1] In 1920, Peck played for the Fort Wayne Friars in the team's victory over the Columbus Panhandles.[2]

Career[edit]

He was selected as a First Team All-American at center in 1914, 1915, and 1916.[3] He played under Coach "Pop" Warner, winning back-to-back national championships in 1915 and 1916 at the University of Pittsburgh.[4] Peck dropped out of college during the spring of 1916 due to the death of his father, but he was able to academically qualify for the 1916 season – during which Peck served as team captain – by attending class throughout the summer.[5] Following his time at Pitt, he served as the Athletic director at Culver Military Academy until his unexpected death in 1932.[6] He was posthumously elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1954.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ PFRA Research. "Canton Wins Again 1917". Coffin Corner (Professional Football Researchers Association): 1–5. 
  2. ^ Klosinski, Emil (1992). "Inflation of 1920; A Tale of Two Cities". Coffin Corner (Professional Football Researchers Association) 14 (3): 1–6. 
  3. ^ Borghetti, E.J.; Nestor, Mendy; Welsh, Celeste, eds. (2008). 2008 Pitt Football Media Guide (PDF). Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania: University of Pittsburgh. p. 8. 
  4. ^ "Past Division I-A Football National Champions". 
  5. ^ "Peck to Lead Panthers" (PDF). The New York Times. September 1, 1916. p. 9. Retrieved December 14, 2009. 
  6. ^ a b "Bob Peck". College Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved December 14, 2009.