Bob Twiggs

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Bob Twiggs at the 2009 Summer CubeSat Developers' Workshop in Logan, Utah, United States

Bob Twiggs is a professor emeritus at Stanford University[1] who is responsible, along with Jordi Puig-Suari of California Polytechnic State University, for co-inventing the CubeSat reference design for miniaturised satellites[2] which became an Industry Standard for design and deployment of the satellites.[3]

Career[edit]

In 2009, Bob Twiggs became a professor at Morehead State University[4] in an effort to push the PocketQube standard leveraging the universities large aperture (21m) space tracking system, and to help develop a space economy in the state of Kentucky.

Bob is currently[when?] splitting his time between Morehead State University in Kentucky, and the University of Idaho.[citation needed]

CubeSats[edit]

Twiggs was the co-inventor of the CubeSat reference design,[5] along with professor Jordi Puig-Suari of California Polytechnic State University. Their goal was to enable graduate students to be able to design, build, test and operate in space a spacecraft with capabilities similar to that of the first spacecraft, Sputnik.[6]

Over time, the CubeSat design emerged as an Industry standard, widely "adopted by universities, companies and government agencies around the world."[6]

The first CubeSats were launched into low Earth orbit in June 2003. As of August 2012, approximately 75 CubeSats have been placed into orbit, and the number is growing rapidly.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Prof. Twiggs". 2009-05-03. 
  2. ^ "Kentucky Space: Prof. Bob Twiggs: CubeSats make space more accessible". 2009-05-03. 
  3. ^ "SEEDMAGAZINE.COM : Revolutionary Minds : The Game Changers : Bob Twiggs + Jordi Puig-Suari". 2009-05-03. 
  4. ^ "CubeSat Workshop Program of Events". 2009-08-15. 
  5. ^ . 2009-10-06 http://spacefellowship.com/news/art14006/satellite-pioneer-joins-morehead-state-s-space-science-faculty.html.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  6. ^ a b c "Cubist Movement". Space News. 2012-08-13. p. 30. When professors Jordi Puig-Suari of California Polytechnic State University and Bob Twiggs of Stanford University invented the cubesat a little more than a decade ago, they never imagined that the tiny satellites would be adopted by universities, companies and government agencies around the world. They simply wanted to design a spacecraft with capabilities similar to Sputnik that graduate student could design, build, test and operate. For size, the professors settled on a 10-centimeter cube because it was large enough to accommodate a basic communications payload, solar panels and a battery. 

External links[edit]