Bob Williams (coach)

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Bob Williams
C R Williams - VT.jpg
Williams pictured in The Bugle 1908, Virginia Tech yearbook
Sport(s) Football
Biographical details
Born (1877-08-01)August 1, 1877
Bland, Virginia
Died October 17, 1957(1957-10-17) (aged 80)
DeLand, Florida
Alma mater University of Virginia[1]
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1902–1903
1904–1905
1906
1907
1909
1913–1915
1926
South Carolina
Davidson
Clemson
Virginia Tech
Clemson
Clemson
Clemson
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
1913–1915 Clemson
Head coaching record
Overall 52–28–7
Statistics
College Football Data Warehouse

Charles Robert "Bob" Williams (August 1, 1877 – October 17, 1957) was an American football coach and college athletics administrator. Williams coached at South Carolina, Davidson, Clemson, and Virginia Tech.

A 1902 graduate of the University of Virginia, Williams served as the Gamecocks' mentor for two seasons, 1902 and 1903, achieving 6–1 and 8–2 records. In 1902, he oversaw an upset of the rival Clemson Tigers, who were coached by John Heisman. This was the only game lost by the Tigers that year.

From 1904 to 1905 he coached at Davidson, where he compiled a 9–4–1 record.

Williams came to Clemson in 1906. The Tigers went undefeated with a 4–0–3 record, with wins over Georgia, Auburn, Tennessee, and the John Heisman-coached Georgia Tech team. Clemson's first forward pass took place on November 29, 1906, during the game with Georgia Tech in Atlanta. Left End Powell Lykes, dropped back to kick, but lobbed a 30-yard pass to George Warren instead. Clemson won, 10–0.

Williams left for Virginia Tech for the 1907 season, leading the Hokies to a 7–2 record. Williams then returned to Clemson in 1909. The 1909 season was notable for the resumption of the Clemson-Carolina rivalry after a five-year gap, caused by a near riot in October 1903. The Tigers enjoyed a 6–3 season under Williams' guidance and defeated the Gamecocks, 6–0, in Columbia on November 4.

Williams was replaced by Frank Dobson in 1910 who had a three-year run at the school, the first coach to actually have a signed contract. With Dobson's departure after the 1912 season, Williams returned for the second time to the Clemson head coaching position. He, too, would serve for three years, 1913–1915. The Tigers produced records of 4–4 in 1913, 5–3–1 in 1914, and 2–4–2 in 1915. In the 41 games that Williams coached in five seasons, he went 21–14–6, for a .585 winning percentage.

Between the years of 1915 and 1926, Williams practiced law in Roanoke, Virginia, and was the city's mayor. He returned to coach Clemson for the final 5 games of 1926. He died after a stroke in DeLand, Florida in 1957.[2]

Head coaching record[edit]

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
South Carolina Gamecocks (Independent) (1902–1903)
1902 South Carolina 6–1
1903 South Carolina 8–2
South Carolina: 14–3
Davidson Wildcats (Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association) (1904–1905)
1904 Davidson 6–1–1
1905 Davidson 3–3
Davidson: 9–4–1
Clemson Tigers (Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association) (1906)
1906 Clemson 4–0–3 4–0–2
Virginia Tech Hokies (Independent) (1907)
1907 Virginia Tech 7–2
Virginia Tech: 7–2
Clemson Tigers (Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association) (1909)
1909 Clemson 6–3 2–2
Clemson Tigers (Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association) (1913–1915)
1913 Clemson 4–4 2–4
1914 Clemson 6–3–1 3–2
1915 Clemson 2–4–2 1–0–1
Clemson Tigers (Southern Conference) (1926)
1926 Clemson 0–5[n 1] 0–2[n 1] 18th[n 1]
Clemson: 22–19–6
Total: 52–28–7
      National championship         Conference title         Conference division title

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Bud Saunders coached the first four games of the season, during which Clemson had a 2–2 record overall and a 1–1 conference mark, before resigning. Clemson finished with an overall record of 2–7 and a conference mark of 1–3, placing 18th in the Southern Conference.

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ University of Virginia Deceased Alumni Files

Additional sources[edit]

External links[edit]